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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Dsprok 10-12-16 05:42 AM


Originally Posted by bazil4696 (Post 19106201)
'71 & '73 Raleighs all kleened and polished for the upcoming thanksgiving weekend here in Canada.
It was so beautiful outside today, I had to ride at lunch, and talked two guys from work to join me.

Nice bikes.

missmixte 10-12-16 12:14 PM

Hello knowledgeable people. I've put a 22 tooth cog and new tires (Schwalb Delta Cruiser) on a 1974 Raleigh Sports and am also putting on a new chain.

My problem: If I push the rear axle all the way back in the dropouts, the rear tire rubs on the fender in the back. Is it safe to have the rear wheel further forward within the dropouts so that the tire doesn't rub?
I can see from a circular wear pattern in the paint that, maybe for this reason, the previous owner had the wheel far forward, almost to the end--or is that called the beginning?--of the dropouts where the wheel would drop out. Is that safe/acceptable?

dweenk 10-12-16 12:32 PM


Originally Posted by missmixte (Post 19118273)
Hello knowledgeable people. I've put a 22 tooth cog and new tires (Schwalb Delta Cruiser) on a 1974 Raleigh Sports and am also putting on a new chain.

My problem: If I push the rear axle all the way back in the dropouts, the rear tire rubs on the fender in the back. Is it safe to have the rear wheel further forward within the dropouts so that the tire doesn't rub?
I can see from a circular wear pattern in the paint that, maybe for this reason, the previous owner had the wheel far forward, almost to the end--or is that called the beginning?--of the dropouts where the wheel would drop out. Is that safe/acceptable?

There is a lot of room in the rear drop out for adjustment. It sounds like the chain is a bit too long. Just shorten it (1 link is 1/2"), or have a bike shop do it. It may be that your new tires have a higher profile - the fix is the same though.

missmixte 10-12-16 12:35 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 19118316)
There is a lot of room in the rear drop out for adjustment. It sounds like the chain is a bit too long. Just shorten it (1 link is 1/2"), or have a bike shop do it. It may be that your new tires have a higher profile - the fix is the same though.

Thanks! So as long as I tighten the bolts there's no safety reason why the wheel needs to be all the way back in the dropouts? Basically I don't want the wheel to fall out while I'm riding, that's my fear. eeks.

BigChief 10-12-16 12:41 PM

It's hard to stop riding in this fall weather. Back to work after some coffee. I did remember to bring my phone along today. I tend to stay in out of the way places, not much to see. I guess I'll never be a photographer like some of you here. Still, here's the roadster on a couple of my favorite roads.
http://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f.../wed_ride1.jpghttp://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f.../wed_ride2.jpg

Salubrious 10-12-16 12:46 PM


Originally Posted by missmixte (Post 19118322)
Thanks! So as long as I tighten the bolts there's no safety reason why the wheel needs to be all the way back in the dropouts? Basically I don't want the wheel to fall out while I'm riding, that's my fear. eeks.

The extra room is there so as the chain wears you can move the wheel back to tighten it up. When the chain is properly set you should be able to pick up the middle of the chain about 3/4".

If the nuts are tight the wheel isn't going anywhere and it can't fall out at any rate.

missmixte 10-12-16 12:49 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 19118351)
The extra room is there so as the chain wears you can move the wheel back to tighten it up. When the chain is properly set you should be able to pick up the middle of the chain about 3/4".

If the nuts are tight the wheel isn't going anywhere and it can't fall out at any rate.

Oh okay! Thanks!!

DQRider 10-12-16 01:06 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 19118316)
There is a lot of room in the rear drop out for adjustment. It sounds like the chain is a bit too long. Just shorten it (1 link is 1/2"), or have a bike shop do it. It may be that your new tires have a higher profile - the fix is the same though.

Let me add that, if for some reason removing a full link is too much, you can buy a "half-link" from any of the usual suspects in the bike parts trade. I use Amazon here for purposes of illustration only:

https://www.amazon.com/KMC-Bicycle-C.../dp/B00HZ8PAQY

I've used these successfully on a couple of my 10-speed to IGH conversions. They work fine.

Salubrious 10-12-16 01:37 PM


Originally Posted by missmixte (Post 19118361)
Oh okay! Thanks!!

An additional note- as pointed out earlier, if the wheel goes all the way to the rear of the dropout your chain is too long; as you noted the wheel runs into the fender.

You'll need a chain link removal tool to get the chain to the right length. There is a bit of a technique to it! So I would practice removing and installing links on the old chain if its still around (youtube is your friend), otherwise get someone to show you how to use the tool.

missmixte 10-12-16 01:44 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 19118457)
An additional note- as pointed out earlier, if the wheel goes all the way to the rear of the dropout your chain is too long; as you noted the wheel runs into the fender.

You'll need a chain link removal tool to get the chain to the right length. There is a bit of a technique to it! So I would practice removing and installing links on the old chain if its still around (youtube is your friend), otherwise get someone to show you how to use the tool.

I have the tool and know how to remove links, but not how to add them. So I'll have to be careful not to remove too many! Nope, I believe I intelligently lost or threw away the old chain so it's just me, the new chain, the chain tool, and my resourcefulness.

BigChief 10-12-16 04:57 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19117187)
Correct-- window shifter is 1950s era.

1938-48 is the long lever:


https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jF9vyzkN2...513_213624.jpg

1948-49: the uncommon "silver" or "black" solid face (two types)
Starting around 1950, and for much of that decade you see a variety of window shifters with various faceplates. They indeed were plated to start with, and lose their plating easily. If you have the short lever, window shifter, it's 1950s-era.

See: http://genetics.mgh.harvard.edu/hanc...satriggers.pdf

for an excellent resource.

What a beautiful bit of manufacturing this is. The embossing from hand cut dies is all in relief. The trigger looks forged and that rich 56 Buick chrome plating. Nobody would put this much effort into bicycle shifter anymore.

mirfi 10-13-16 04:31 PM

Raleigh RSW's for sale

https://washingtondc.craigslist.org/...795040743.html

https://images.craigslist.org/01414_...Ns_600x450.jpg

The red one looks mint

SirMike1983 10-13-16 10:16 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19118953)
What a beautiful bit of manufacturing this is. The embossing from hand cut dies is all in relief. The trigger looks forged and that rich 56 Buick chrome plating. Nobody would put this much effort into bicycle shifter anymore.

They look nice, but I do think the short lever shifters from 1948 through the 1950s (silver/black face solid and window face) work better. The window shifters really are a functional wonder when you find one in good shape.

BigChief 10-14-16 04:35 AM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19121774)
They look nice, but I do think the short lever shifters from 1948 through the 1950s (silver/black face solid and window face) work better. The window shifters really are a functional wonder when you find one in good shape.

I have early 50s 3 or 4 speed window shifters on my roadsters now and I think they're perfect for rod brake bikes. The lever isn't as long as this very early one, but it's longer than the late 50s on type. I can position them in a very comfortable position for me. The one on my 72 was a rusty mess when I took it off a salvage bike, but it cleaned up nicely and as unlikely as it sounds, I found someone selling NOS replacement leaf springs on eBay. Works beautifully. They are nice shifters.

JaccoW 10-14-16 03:56 PM

Not exactly vintage-approved, but I do get excited from an engineering point of view about this:
Ginko feine veloteile and their heatsink modified SA+ brake hubs.

That and a ton of small tuning parts for Sturmey Archer brake hubs.

gster 10-14-16 07:34 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19118337)
It's hard to stop riding in this fall weather. Back to work after some coffee. I did remember to bring my phone along today. I tend to stay in out of the way places, not much to see. I guess I'll never be a photographer like some of you here. Still, here's the roadster on a couple of my favorite roads.
http://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f.../wed_ride1.jpghttp://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f.../wed_ride2.jpg

A Path Racer on a path.

DQRider 10-14-16 07:48 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19123717)
A Path Racer on a path.

Those are excellent shots! Wow, the leaves there are much farther along in the color cycle than here in MN. Although I suppose it probably looks the same up north, like Ely or International Falls. I have yet to take any Fall Colors shots. Better get busy this weekend.

Nice path racer! Can't beat a DL1 for that - the rod brakes really stand out. :thumb:

scale 10-15-16 11:47 AM

Larger rear cog / chain guard issues.
 
I got a 22t to replace the 19t on my 1969 superbe. I am having issues with getting the frame tabs for the chainguard to line up with the holes on the chainguard. IS there a trick here? I might just leave the guard off. ITs kind of pointless. The screws/nuts for my chainguard are gone as well. Figuring they are witworth threaded i would probably just get smaller ones that fit through the hole with washers and nylon nuts....but at this point i cant get it to line up wiht the holes. Perhaps some spacers between the guard and the tab would do the trick.

browngw 10-15-16 02:27 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Enjoyed the mild autumn weather today with a ride to the coffee shop with my sweetie and riding the '79 Raleigh DL1 known as "Sir Wayes A. Tonne" The Radio Canada CBC backpack does duty as a bike bag. It has taken a while to get all the bugs out of this one, but SWAT is becoming my favorite "townie".

arex 10-15-16 02:28 PM


Originally Posted by scale (Post 19124651)
I got a 22t to replace the 19t on my 1969 superbe. I am having issues with getting the frame tabs for the chainguard to line up with the holes on the chainguard. IS there a trick here? I might just leave the guard off. ITs kind of pointless. The screws/nuts for my chainguard are gone as well. Figuring they are witworth threaded i would probably just get smaller ones that fit through the hole with washers and nylon nuts....but at this point i cant get it to line up wiht the holes. Perhaps some spacers between the guard and the tab would do the trick.

The trick is to tighten NOTHING down until you've gotten all the screws in place. Give yourself plenty of slack to wiggle things into place. I had similar issues on a R20, wondering what the hell happened that the guard didn't fit anymore. It'll fit, but you'll need to adjust things as you go to get them into place.

BigChief 10-15-16 02:37 PM


Originally Posted by arex (Post 19124936)
The trick is to tighten NOTHING down until you've gotten all the screws in place. Give yourself plenty of slack to wiggle things into place. I had similar issues on a R20, wondering what the hell happened that the guard didn't fit anymore. It'll fit, but you'll need to adjust things as you go to get them into place.

Yes, especially the clamp at the back of the chainguard. That can move up and down on the seat stay, attach that last.

arex 10-15-16 02:40 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19124953)
Yes, especially the clamp at the back of the chainguard. That can move up and down on the seat stay, attach that last.

This.

dweenk 10-15-16 03:47 PM

[MENTION=298130]browngw[/MENTION]
Like the DL-1. Does the bag interfere with the wheel?

browngw 10-15-16 09:07 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 19125092)
@browngw
Like the DL-1. Does the bag interfere with the wheel?

The benefits of a full chaincase (one of the few)! The bag (gifted by my stepdaughter) had a full size pocket in the back, most likely for a laptop and I cut a stiff piece of plastic to slip in and keep the flat shape on the back of the bag. Using the bag straps and some additional Velcro straps it works fine. The seat stay and large diameter rack strut keep it away from the wheel.

DQRider 10-16-16 06:13 AM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 19124935)
Enjoyed the mild autumn weather today with a ride to the coffee shop with my sweetie and riding the '79 Raleigh DL1 known as "Sir Wayes A. Tonne" The Radio Canada CBC backpack does duty as a bike bag. It has taken a while to get all the bugs out of this one, but SWAT is becoming my favorite "townie".

SWAT cuts a dashing figure in those surroundings. I love the versatility of the DL1; it always exceeds my expectations on rides both long and short. I'm still amazed at the floating quality of the ride, once you get rolling, and the ease with which it deals with bad pavement. The only time I resent anything about it is when I have to lift it up onto the rather high bike rack on the trunk of my car.

Of course, it would help if I took the loaded down bags off first... :p

Great photos!

gster 10-16-16 07:01 AM


Originally Posted by arex (Post 19124936)
The trick is to tighten NOTHING down until you've gotten all the screws in place. Give yourself plenty of slack to wiggle things into place. I had similar issues on a R20, wondering what the hell happened that the guard didn't fit anymore. It'll fit, but you'll need to adjust things as you go to get them into place.

Sound advice.

BigChief 10-16-16 09:03 AM


Originally Posted by DQRider (Post 19125963)
SWAT cuts a dashing figure in those surroundings. I love the versatility of the DL1; it always exceeds my expectations on rides both long and short. I'm still amazed at the floating quality of the ride, once you get rolling, and the ease with which it deals with bad pavement. The only time I resent anything about it is when I have to lift it up onto the rather high bike rack on the trunk of my car.

Of course, it would help if I took the loaded down bags off first... :p

Great photos!

Yes, SWAT is sure looking great. What a lovely roadster. I have to admit, I've owned one for years before I really developed an appreciation for them. I got my '73 from a newspaper ad. That gives you an idea how long ago it was. I did notice the Rolls Royce ride but it was geared impossibly tall for me and the brakes barely worked, so it was a short ride, very occasional type bike for me. If I really wanted to ride anywhere much, I took my road bike or a Sports. It wasn't until last year that I finally swapped the 16T cog for a 22T so I actually had an underdrive to help with hills and headwinds. It wasn't until this summer that I took the time to learn how to get rod brakes to work properly. This summer I got my rescue case '72 DL-1 on the road with new Conti Tour Ride tires, geared down and I've found it to be an excellent all road type bike. It's smooth and pleasant on paved roads and handles unpaved and sandy roads that would be misery on the Sports with ease. Modern manufacturers just fit their regular utility bikes with fatter tires for this purpose. I now think the ultimate all road type bike would use roadster type frame geometry, 28" wheels and dispense with things like sprung seat posts and front suspensions. I'll never spend the money, but I'm thinking a Pashley Govner with a short reach stem, north roads and a rear carrier might just be the perfect, all road townie.

agmetal 10-16-16 09:07 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19126203)
Yes, SWAT is sure looking great. What a lovely roadster. I have to admit, I've owned one for years before I really developed an appreciation for them. I got my '73 from a newspaper ad. That gives you an idea how long ago it was. I did notice the Rolls Royce ride but it was geared impossibly tall for me and the brakes barely worked, so it was a short ride, very occasional type bike for me. If I really wanted to ride anywhere much, I took my road bike or a Sports. It wasn't until last year that I finally swapped the 16T cog for a 22T so I actually had an underdrive to help with hills and headwinds. It wasn't until this summer that I took the time to learn how to get rod brakes to work properly. This summer I got my rescue case '72 DL-1 on the road with new Conti Tour Ride tires, geared down and I've found it to be an excellent all road type bike. It's smooth and pleasant on paved roads and handles unpaved and sandy roads that would be misery on the Sports with ease. Modern manufacturers just fit their regular utility bikes with fatter tires for this purpose. I now think the ultimate all road type bike would use roadster type frame geometry, 28" wheels and dispense with things like sprung seat posts and front suspensions. I'll never spend the money, but I'm thinking a Pashley Govner with a short reach stem, north roads and a rear carrier might just be the perfect, all road townie.

I really want to find a suitable roadster frame (i.e., non-Raleigh) to put some modern-ish components on, with drop bars, and have sort of a roadie-roadster. I think it'd be great fun on rougher/potholed roads.

BigChief 10-16-16 10:23 AM


Originally Posted by agmetal (Post 19126212)
I really want to find a suitable roadster frame (i.e., non-Raleigh) to put some modern-ish components on, with drop bars, and have sort of a roadie-roadster. I think it'd be great fun on rougher/potholed roads.

for folks with dough, it's all done for you. A 531 frame too! I really would like one of these. But...lunch is over...time to ride. I love this weather.
Guv'nor | Gents Classic Path Racer Bicycle | Pashley Cycles

agmetal 10-16-16 01:16 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19126333)
for folks with dough, it's all done for you. A 531 frame too! I really would like one of these. But...lunch is over...time to ride. I love this weather.
Guv'nor | Gents Classic Path Racer Bicycle | Pashley Cycles

I'm very familiar with the Guv'nor and the Speed 5, but this isn't quite what I mean. A friend owns a Guv'nor, and I've taken it for a spin...while it's not bad, you only have the one hand position, and I mean real road drop bars with levers that give the rider a "hoods" position, and possibly the 3-speed hub controlled by an STI lever (yes, it's possible - I've done it before)


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