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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BigChief 11-30-16 09:51 PM


Originally Posted by DQRider (Post 19224018)
Man, I wonder how many fathers go through this. :foo:

A winter's worth of love went into this `67 Dunelt. But when Spring came along, and I presented this to my then 16 year-old daughter, she told me it was too "old and rickety" for her. This, after I built up an alloy front wheel for better braking, repacked the bottom bracket and headset with new balls, tuned it and tweaked it and devised a front basket setup strong enough to carry her considerable load of camera equipment on those creamy new Schwalbe tires. All for naught.

http://i1073.photobucket.com/albums/...ps2hafl1eu.png

So I traded it for a Raysport 531 Turismo frame, and I'm building that into the ultimate British-style Light Roadster. She's saving for a car... :twitchy:

That is gorgeous! Beautifully done. You didn't even mention the corrected gearing. Old and rickety? Ouch

elcraft 11-30-16 10:09 PM


Originally Posted by crank_addict (Post 19216213)
Recently spotted these split designed tubes. Might be ideal for three speeds and rod-brake / caliper types. I realize one could still patch without complete wheel removal or use a goop sealant but for complete tube change, these look interesting.

http://assets.academy.com/mgen/70/10571970.jpg

Where did you spot these tubes?

agmetal 12-01-16 11:06 AM

I still need to order a bunch of parts, and some of what's shown is stuff that I'm only using to help visualize things, but here are a couple progress shots of my ANT roadster project, compared to my 1937 Raleigh that I'm modeling it after:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...129_231431.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...129_231410.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...129_231329.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...926_143723.jpg

crank_addict 12-01-16 01:13 PM


Originally Posted by elcraft (Post 19224084)
Where did you spot these tubes?

Walmart and Meijer, though odd they don't show them at their online stores. Called Huffy Quick change inner tube. Walmart store had them priced approx. $8, double the standard inner tube cost.

adventurepdx 12-01-16 01:37 PM


Originally Posted by ollo_ollo (Post 19223698)
Very nice! I think it's a male/female thing, or, as one of my grand daughters remarked about a drop bar road bike I gave her a few years ago, "They're not in style anymore". I don't get it, tons of style in my book. Don

I don't think it's necessarily a male/female thing, or a young/old thing. Some people just don't appreciate "old" things and wonder why you are wasting all this time fixing up an old bike when you can go down to Wal-Targ and get a brand new one.

And some folks like the "idea" of having/riding a bike, as long as it's just an idea. When the idea presents itself as reality, then all the sudden they have second thoughts.

scale 12-01-16 09:44 PM

Getting ready to order spokes for my Superbe. Are they the standard 14ga that i want? Danscomp has them for .25 each which is a great deal but im not sure if that is the correct gauge. I ordered them once before but they only take phone orders and cant recall what i ordered the last time. Here is what im looking at currently. https://www.danscomp.com/products/43...14G_Spoke.html

gster 12-02-16 05:53 AM

Nice bike, but $1500!!!
 
4 Attachment(s)
A local Kijiji ad has this BSA listed at a massive $!500.00. I doubt he'l get many calls...

bazil4696 12-02-16 09:19 AM

1 Attachment(s)
[QUOTE=DQRider;19224018]Man, I wonder how many fathers go through this. :foo:

A winter's worth of love went into this `67 Dunelt. But when Spring came along, and I presented this to my then 16 year-old daughter, she told me it was too "old and rickety" for her. This, after I built up an alloy front wheel for better braking, repacked the bottom bracket and headset with new balls, tuned it and tweaked it and devised a front basket setup strong enough to carry her considerable load of camera equipment on those creamy new Schwalbe tires. All for naught.



My 22 yr old daughter and I restored this Superbe. She worked about two or three hours on it, and the other 40 by me.. but rides it from time to time, even going with me on a wine tour this summer.
She plans to get her friends and borrow some of the vintage fleet off me so the girls can all go...
At least it's not sports cars!

clubman 12-02-16 03:09 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19226676)
A local Kijiji ad has this BSA listed at a massive $!500.00. I doubt he'l get many calls...

Not even that nice, missing parts. substitute parts etc. Where's the gorgeous fork crown?
$50 imo

gster 12-02-16 03:17 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 19227898)
Not even that nice, missing parts. substitute parts etc. Where's the gorgeous fork crown?
$50 imo

yeah, I agree.
I'm always on the look out for a nice BSA to add to the stable but you're right.
Even the pump is worthless..
There's a lot of wishful thinkers out there.

clubman 12-02-16 03:34 PM

In good condition, the Lucas King of the Road Challis bell is worth $50 to the right buyer.

badmother 12-03-16 02:21 AM


Originally Posted by ollo_ollo (Post 19220300)
This 3 speed has been hanging out on the Portland, OR CL for a few months, asking $300:

"OK first things first..this Bicycle looks like it just came off the showroom floor! This made in Norway DBS or (Den Beste Sykkel) translated The Best Bicycle... all original down the the tires and equipped with a Torpedo Sachs made in west germany 3 speed... DBS is in excellent condition and rides beautifully. It has dual brakes... coaster brake and Front Drum brake. Front and rear lights are generator activated and work great. Standover height is 30.5 inches. Thanks for looking Mark Local Pick up only"

The stem on this bike is not original. It is missing its rear rack. The crank is a "Fauber crank", different from other similar cranks and common all over scandinavia in those days. They all had that drum brake.

The expert is here: Restureringsverksted 1890 - 1990 : Den Rustne Eike

BigChief 12-03-16 05:44 AM


Originally Posted by badmother (Post 19228851)
The stem on this bike is not original. It is missing its rear rack. The crank is a "Fauber crank", different from other similar cranks and common all over scandinavia in those days. They all had that drum brake.

The expert is here: Restureringsverksted 1890 - 1990 : Den Rustne Eike

I recognize that stem. It's an extra long SunLite. Very handy. You can use them to set up a smaller framed bike for taller people. Even with it's extra length, it looks like it's set a bit past max to me.

Loose Chain 12-03-16 10:54 AM

Oddly, my 21 inches Raleighs and my two 23 inch frames have the same top tube length. Not only that, one of my 21s, my coffee colored coffee cruiser, is 1/3 inch longer in the top tube than either of my 23 inch frames. But I would like to get one of those Sunlight stems with a little more reach.

I am normal sized, but fore and aft, I feel a little scrunched on these E3S bikes.

BigChief 12-03-16 11:26 AM

Oh yeah, the SunLite stem is the way to go if you're tall and want to ride a 21" bike. They make a 10" long 21.1mm touring stem that also gives you about 2" more reach. The clamp is for 1" bars and Raleigh bars are 15/16" so you need a 1/32" shim if you're going to use the original bars. I think soft metal like copper work best. Lately, I've been using lead chimney flashing. I keep hammering it down and trimming the sides until I get a nice fit. Works great, never slips.

Loose Chain 12-03-16 02:27 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19229388)
Oh yeah, the SunLite stem is the way to go if you're tall and want to ride a 21" bike. They make a 10" long 21.1mm touring stem that also gives you about 2" more reach. The clamp is for 1" bars and Raleigh bars are 15/16" so you need a 1/32" shim if you're going to use the original bars. I think soft metal like copper work best. Lately, I've been using lead chimney flashing. I keep hammering it down and trimming the sides until I get a nice fit. Works great, never slips.


Thanks, good info.I have some copper and brass shim material. These can be bought a machine tool type and mechanics shops. I think I will look into one.

But, like I said, the 21 inch bike is bigger than the 23, I am not sure why Raleigh bothered with sizes because raising or lowering the top tube without lengthening or shortening the top tube is not a different size bike frame, it is just the same size bike frame with a lower or higher choice of top tubes. Weird. I prefer the 21 with the linger top tube, feels better.

SirMike1983 12-03-16 08:18 PM

This 1941 Schwinn roadster had been stripped of its parts. I bought the bike because I had a bunch of 1940s-era parts for it. I bought the handful of things I needed to finish it. Before and after:

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AUY0IbSSL...ect%2B2016.jpg
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HJfVqDdHh...203_153504.jpg
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-r7xpDcLEg...203_153603.jpghttps://3.bp.blogspot.com/-uP_FaZPmu...203_150401.jpghttps://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F-o5Qnmjb...203_153515.jpg

DQRider 12-03-16 08:37 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19230187)
This 1941 Schwinn roadster had been stripped of its parts. I bought the bike because I had a bunch of 1940s-era parts for it. I bought the handful of things I needed to finish it. Before and after:



https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F-o5Qnmjb...203_153515.jpg

What an excellent build! Congratulations. :thumb: I really like that SA quadrant shifter on the top tube. I've got that same Banjo Bro.s saddlebag on 4 of my bikes. They fit right in on a vintage bike, and you can't beat them for the $.

How does it ride?

ollo_ollo 12-03-16 08:52 PM

"She worked about two or three hours on it, and the other 40 by me.."
That's actually a pretty good division of labor for kids/grand kids. :) Don

BigChief 12-03-16 09:06 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19230187)
This 1941 Schwinn roadster had been stripped of its parts. I bought the bike because I had a bunch of 1940s-era parts for it. I bought the handful of things I needed to finish it. Before and after:

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AUY0IbSSL...ect%2B2016.jpg
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HJfVqDdHh...203_153504.jpg
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-r7xpDcLEg...203_153603.jpghttps://3.bp.blogspot.com/-uP_FaZPmu...203_150401.jpghttps://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F-o5Qnmjb...203_153515.jpg

Wow, great job. Glad this frame found it's way to someone that could do a quality restoration like this.

SirMike1983 12-03-16 09:42 PM


Originally Posted by DQRider (Post 19230216)
What an excellent build! Congratulations. :thumb: I really like that SA quadrant shifter on the top tube. I've got that same Banjo Bro.s saddlebag on 4 of my bikes. They fit right in on a vintage bike, and you can't beat them for the $.

How does it ride?

It is surprisingly light and pleasant. It's not truly 'fast', but it's livelier than the later, electroforge welded Schwinn bikes of the 1960s-70s. This was one of their fillet brazed frames. It has the "seamless tube" decal on the seat tube. The cottered cranks are considerably lighter than the one-piece/ashtabula alternative.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2Sk1wzmjb...203_150319.jpg

gster 12-04-16 08:51 AM

Brooks Professional
 
2 Attachment(s)
Picked up a slightly worn Brooks Professional saddle yesterday for a reasonable $50.00 (CDN). Haven't decided where to use it yet.

3speedslow 12-04-16 09:20 AM

That's a stunner of a saddle! Love that aged colour. I am sure with all your projects you will find a place for it. Will this saddle let you sit upright on it in comfort or will the bike have to be a scorcher?

crank_addict 12-04-16 10:13 AM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19230187)
This 1941 Schwinn roadster had been stripped of its parts. I bought the bike because I had a bunch of 1940s-era parts for it. I bought the handful of things I needed to finish it. Before and after:


https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F-o5Qnmjb...203_153515.jpg

Thats quite a handsome bike and nicely done. The top hat decal is my fave. :thumb:

I would prefer an earlier fillet brazed like this vs. later electro forged but really appreciate them all.

Have a freebie mid- 1960's Racer which is the EF frame (and also rims), shares the same chain ring pattern but ashtabula arm / construction.

Under appreciated, yet millions made have to wonder where are they today? My electro forge Racer is a fairly rough project but plans are to resurrect it and have as a guest loaner. Piece of bicycle history with its unique construction, never to be done again.

BigChief 12-04-16 02:40 PM


Originally Posted by crank_addict (Post 19230930)
Thats quite a handsome bike and nicely done. The top hat decal is my fave. :thumb:

I would prefer an earlier fillet brazed like this vs. later electro forged but really appreciate them all.

Have a freebie mid- 1960's Racer which is the EF frame (and also rims), shares the same chain ring pattern but ashtabula arm / construction.

Under appreciated, yet millions made have to wonder where are they today? My electro forge Racer is a fairly rough project but plans are to resurrect it and have as a guest loaner. Piece of bicycle history with its unique construction, never to be done again.

I've been keeping my eyes out for older Schwinn lightweights for years and have come to the conclusion that not many were made, especially in the large frame size. According to the catalogs, lightweight bikes like the Traveler were available in 23" frames. Try to find one. If I come up with a nice 3 speed Schwinn project, I'll report back here, but I've been looking for the past 25 years and haven't found one yet.

Loose Chain 12-04-16 05:21 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19231337)
I've been keeping my eyes out for older Schwinn lightweights for years and have come to the conclusion that not many were made, especially in the large frame size. According to the catalogs, lightweight bikes like the Traveler were available in 23" frames. Try to find one. If I come up with a nice 3 speed Schwinn project, I'll report back here, but I've been looking for the past 25 years and haven't found one yet.

I had a Traveller 23 inch. It was a boat. I gave it to a bike shop.

J

BigChief 12-04-16 05:49 PM


Originally Posted by Loose Chain (Post 19231523)
I had a Traveller 23 inch. It was a boat. I gave it to a bike shop.

J

Interesting. I haven't had a chance to try one. I suppose that could happen to me as well. I am used to Raleighs.

Loose Chain 12-04-16 06:01 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19231575)
Interesting. I haven't had a chance to try one. I suppose that could happen to me as well. I am used to Raleighs.

It was a hugely heavy, dull frame, chrome fenders, non standard wheel size and all. Some may like it but I passed it to a shop that build bikes for the less than fortunate. It was sturdy enough to pull a plow, maybe a farmer bought it.

thumpism 12-04-16 06:25 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19231337)
I've been keeping my eyes out for older Schwinn lightweights for years and have come to the conclusion that not many were made, especially in the large frame size. According to the catalogs, lightweight bikes like the Traveler were available in 23" frames. Try to find one. If I come up with a nice 3 speed Schwinn project, I'll report back here, but I've been looking for the past 25 years and haven't found one yet.

Here's something local but it may not be to your taste. Might not be 23" and it's not cheap. Let me know if you want me to keep looking.

Vintage Schwinn 3 speed bike

Vintage Schwinn 3 speed bike - $200

https://images.craigslist.org/00e0e_...pb_600x450.jpg

condition: good
make / manufacturer: Schwinn
model name / number: Suburban
size / dimensions: 3 speed


Vintage Schwinn Suburban 3 speed bike in good condition.

SirMike1983 12-04-16 09:55 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19231337)
I've been keeping my eyes out for older Schwinn lightweights for years and have come to the conclusion that not many were made, especially in the large frame size. According to the catalogs, lightweight bikes like the Traveler were available in 23" frames. Try to find one. If I come up with a nice 3 speed Schwinn project, I'll report back here, but I've been looking for the past 25 years and haven't found one yet.

Yeah, the earlier ones (before the 1960s) are very uncommon in that larger size (though the catalogs say they made them). I would certainly hold out for a 1964 or earlier bike (blade front fender models). I guess that's like Raleigh in some ways, but Schwinn degraded in a number of ways over the years, from high-quality 3-speeds meant for serious riders, to heavy campus/newspaper route type bikes that were durable, but really did not perform well.

Other brands had tall frames: Dayton, Colson, and Westfield/Columbia. As a matter of fact, someone very recently uncovered a WWII-era tall frame Dayton over at the CABE.


http://thecabe.com/forum/attachments..._n-jpg.389277/


These makers all seemed to model their "lightweights" (as opposed to balloon tire cruisers) off of English designs. In fact, the cottered Schwinn bottom bracket I re-built on that red bike had interchangeable parts with Birmingham Hercules stuff. The adjustable cup and lock ring on the bike are Hercules, and the spindle is from a Phillips.


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