Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=181)
-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Velognome 11-23-10 07:28 AM

So many nice English 3 speeds represented here! Great work everyone!



http://www.bikeforums.net/images/sta...ser-online.png http://www.bikeforums.net/images/but...post-right.png
I'm in the midst of redoing this old Hercules, the hub is simular to yours but an A Type O. I've been unable to find much infor on these hubs other than they seem to pre-date the Hercamatics and the B Types which I believe were made by Sturmey Archer.
Attachment 179467




http://www.bikeforums.net/images/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by gbalke

Am I right in assuming that the Hercules hubs were not date stamped?

Youre correct, the later Hercules (50's on ) and S/A hubs were all date stamped. This one is not. The entire bike is a mystery, I haven't found the "Renoun" model in any adverts post 1938. The elderly gentle man who I bought it from he believed the bike to be a pre-war example. I begining to think it's a late 20's-30's machine.

Road Master 11-23-10 09:41 AM


Originally Posted by gbalke (Post 11829286)
One trick I discovered was using Goop hand cleaner worked quite well. You can apply it with your fingers or an old tooth brush, removing the excess with an old cloth.

Hi! Thanks for the tip - I just happen to have a tub beside the sink. Robert

kingfish254 11-24-10 11:14 PM


Originally Posted by gbalke (Post 11829286)
One trick I discovered was using Goop hand cleaner worked quite well. You can apply it with your fingers or an old tooth brush, removing the excess with an old cloth.


Nice to ear of another use of Goop. It is one of the best hand cleaners out there to me, plus if you get your clothes a bit greasy from chainrings and such, just rub a little Goop on there before you toss it in the hamper. Works wonders.

gbalke 11-25-10 07:51 AM


Originally Posted by Velognome (Post 11829347)
So many nice English 3 speeds represented here! Great work everyone!



Youre correct, the later Hercules (50's on ) and S/A hubs were all date stamped. This one is not. The entire bike is a mystery, I haven't found the "Renoun" model in any adverts post 1938. The elderly gentle man who I bought it from he believed the bike to be a pre-war example. I begining to think it's a late 20's-30's machine.

I have several Hercules catalog scans; 1937, 1949, 1951 and 1953. There's no mention of a Renoun in any of those scans. I sent your photos to a friend in Ireland who is pretty knowledgeable on Hercules and other vintage English bikes. Maybe he can shed some light on the Renoun.

mickey85 11-25-10 07:55 AM


Originally Posted by Road Master (Post 11829096)
Hi Guys! Thank you for the kind words. I'm getting ready for another Indiana winter. We don't get a ton of snow here but the weather is definitely not conducive to working on bikes.



MIght not be, but it is conducive to riding them! Especially the English 3's - they're my primary steeds during the dark times...

noglider 11-25-10 08:27 AM

Hmm, I'm going to pay attention to that this winter. Do my derailleur bikes need tinkering in the winter? If so, I should get my three speed road ready! It's a total wreck now.

mickey85 11-25-10 08:33 AM

Tom, I'm not very sold on the argument that IGH's keep your bike shifting well in the winter. I'll agree that there's less to gunk up, but the only time I've ever had autoshifting due to snow was after 10 miles in 6" of snow and slush. The slush packed in the freewheel and iced, then just turned it to one large, spiny ice-cube. Except for the gear I was primarily using, there wasn't enough tooth for the chain to get a grip on. Derailers have never been a problem in my winter commuting.

But, the 3 speed has a chainguard and full, steel fenders (everything else has full plastic), no fiddlybits to be knocked around if I slide around and biff it, and a good, solid upright ride with tires that can go down to 40 PSI for maximum grip. IMO, the only way it could be better is if I could find those Panaracer Col de la Vie Passhunting tires - they look like CX tires for the 590 size!

noglider 11-25-10 08:41 AM

Thanks, mickey85.

Yeah, I discovered the wisdom of the chainguard when I got my Hercules about two years ago. I don't even have to bind up my trousers! Just jump on and go. What freedom!

And in case you haven't heard me say it, wool dress trousers look good and are very well suited to winter cycling. I get them for $40 at Costco and sometimes for nearly as little as that at Macy's. Nowadays, I'm checking church rummage sales and the like. They make me look older than I am, but I'm quirky that way.

wahoonc 11-25-10 09:23 AM


Originally Posted by gbalke (Post 11840415)
I have several Hercules catalog scans; 1937, 1949, 1951 and 1953. There's no mention of a Renoun in any of those scans. I sent your photos to a friend in Ireland who is pretty knowledgeable on Hercules and other vintage English bikes. Maybe he can shed some light on the Renoun.

Hey any chance of checking the 50's catalogs for a Hercules Skyliner? It is a step through frame 26" Westwood wheels, rod brakes, single speed freewheel. My best guess in 1954. The one we have is red, it came with the brown vinyl Hercules mattress saddle.

Aaron :)

Velognome 11-25-10 09:35 AM


I have several Hercules catalog scans; 1937, 1949, 1951 and 1953. There's no mention of a Renoun in any of those scans. I sent your photos to a friend in Ireland who is pretty knowledgeable on Hercules and other vintage English bikes. Maybe he can shed some light on the Renoun.
Thanks gbalk, Renoun has been a great mystery, keep me posted.

Sixty Fiver 11-25-10 09:38 AM


Originally Posted by mickey85 (Post 11840524)
Tom, I'm not very sold on the argument that IGH's keep your bike shifting well in the winter...

Mickey - It is not an argument... it is a fact.

But then... you live in the tropics.

:)

It is supposed to warm up to freezing in the next few days and hope we can look at more seasonal temperatures after that little cold snap... had to deal with a number of folks who experienced freewheel and cassette seizures at those low temps.

Velognome 11-25-10 09:46 AM


It is supposed to warm up to freezing in the next few days
That's just not right!

michael k 11-25-10 12:42 PM

Has anyone upgraded or replaced their brake calipers on their Sport?

Having 60 yr old cables and bits it's about due and looking at Tektro's sidepulls I've noticed the cable mount positions are reversed.

noglider 11-25-10 01:04 PM

I did on one bike. I put a BMX sidepull on the front and a Weinmann centerpull on the rear. On this bike, I also replaced the rims with Sun CR18's.

It was a women's bike, so the brake cable swung down and up to the brake. I attached the cable stop on the yoke! It even had a barrel adjuster. And it all worked well enough. I don't know if I ever took pictures of that bike. It was an interesting project. It had a Brampton hub, an AW clone. Overhauling it was a witch (with a capital 'B'), because the lubricant had turned to shellac.

At some point, bike component makers noticed that Italian sidepull brakes had their pull arms on the left, while everyone else's were on the right. They switched over to the left to follow the look of prestige. I feel it looks better but it's harder to adjust for us right-handed people. I like to squeeze the caliper with my left hand and tighten the pinch bolt with my right hand. I either have to switch or cross my hands or do it from behind the caliper.

sekaijin 11-26-10 10:28 PM

Question about brake pads
 
Love this thread. Been lurking for a while, while I'm doing my first English 3-speed resto.

Now that I'm rebuilding the brakes, I am wondering about brake pads.

1. Keep 'em or replace 'em? Will new ones brake a lot better than the old ones?

2. If replace ... where do I find the right replacement pads?

Thanks!

Sixty Fiver 11-26-10 10:40 PM


Originally Posted by sekaijin (Post 11846951)
Love this thread. Been lurking for a while, while I'm doing my first English 3-speed resto.

Now that I'm rebuilding the brakes, I am wondering about brake pads.

1. Keep 'em or replace 'em? Will new ones brake a lot better than the old ones?

2. If replace ... where do I find the right replacement pads?

Thanks!

Kool Stop Continentals.

These will greatly improve the braking.

sekaijin 11-28-10 06:01 AM


Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 11846984)
Kool Stop Continentals.

These will greatly improve the braking.

OK, but they don't look like a match for the original brake shoes. Any idea what replacement pads might fit these?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...oesandpads.jpg

wahoonc 11-28-10 06:52 AM


Originally Posted by sekaijin (Post 11851466)
OK, but they don't look like a match for the original brake shoes. Any idea what replacement pads might fit these?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...oesandpads.jpg

The old style campy refills sort of work, they are shorter in length. I use the Continentals.

Aaron :)

sekaijin 11-29-10 06:40 AM


Originally Posted by wahoonc (Post 11851523)
The old style campy refills sort of work, they are shorter in length. I use the Continentals.

Aaron :)

Yes, I saw those and wondered if they would fit.

So, IIRC my options are:

1. stick with original brake pads and shoes

2. get new pads and shoes - i.e. Kool Stop Continentals and find brake shoes to match

3. get Kool Stop campy replacement pads which will "sort of work" with original shoes

#3 makes me uneasy and #2 would send me on a hunt for vintage brake shoes, so I am leaning toward #1 at this point.

Am I missing something? What would you do?


===========


BTW here is the bike - a 1969 Hercules.

Resto in progress, just needs its brake handles, pads, shifter and cables.

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...inprogress.jpg

noglider 11-29-10 09:36 AM

I would absolutely do #2, without hesitation.

gna 11-29-10 10:20 AM


Originally Posted by sekaijin (Post 11856091)
Yes, I saw those and wondered if they would fit.

So, IIRC my options are:

1. stick with original brake pads and shoes

2. get new pads and shoes - i.e. Kool Stop Continentals and find brake shoes to match

3. get Kool Stop campy replacement pads which will "sort of work" with original shoes

#3 makes me uneasy and #2 would send me on a hunt for vintage brake shoes, so I am leaning toward #1 at this point.

Am I missing something? What would you do?


===========


BTW here is the bike - a 1969 Hercules.

Resto in progress, just needs its brake handles, pads, shifter and cables.

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...inprogress.jpg

Nice looking bike.
#2. I would get the Salmon Continentals if you plan on riding the bike. You don't need shoes with the Continentals. They look a bit funny, but they're worth it.

wahoonc 11-29-10 04:43 PM

I go with #2 all the time. If I am going to show the bike I will put the original pads and holders back on. But I ride much more than I show so Continentals it is.

Aaron :)

sekaijin 11-29-10 05:47 PM

OK, it's settled - with four experts in agreement, Kool Stop Continentals it is! Thank you Sixty Fiver, Aaron, Tom and gna! (and gna thank you for clarifying they don't require brake shoes)

mkeller234 11-30-10 12:05 AM

FWIW, I have used the Kool Stop replacement pads in old Weinmann center pull hardware. It worked pretty well but took a bit of work. I like the Continentals best.

noglider 11-30-10 07:52 AM

Eagle 2's are even a bit nicer.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:08 AM.


Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.