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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

adventurepdx 03-25-15 09:37 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 17659286)
Its the reflective stripe that puts me off the World Tours. I don't ride much at night so the safety aspect is a non-issue, and its already hard enough to find something that looks like gumwalls used to without a shiny band running through it.

It's amazing that when gumwalls in 590 comes up, no one mentions the fact that Schwalbe Delta Cruisers come in a gumwall, and no reflective strip to boot! Maybe we're all just fixated on the cream colored Delta Cruisers?
Delta Cruiser, 37-590, Gumwall, Wire | Schwalbe North America
http://cyclocrossracing-cdn.make-a-s...600-407983.Jpg

adventurepdx 03-25-15 09:45 PM


Originally Posted by PalmettoUpstate (Post 17659184)
So I guess you're not in the Col de la Vie camp?


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 17659286)
I tried out the CdVs for the first time, getting out for a cold but longer ride the other day. They are very cushy over rougher roads, but I do feel they roll very slowly. Glad to have tried them, and I am sure they will last a while, but I'm not likely to buy another pair. The Paselas I tried on my Trek IGH conversion were ideal but not made in the 590 size.

I also tried the Col de la Vies, and am not in the camp. I liked the look, and also felt it was pretty cush over rough/gravel. I felt that they rolled a bit faster than Delta Cruisers. My biggest issue with them was how...delicate they are. Pretty much no flat protection. I got tired of the numerous flats, especially a number of slow leaks that I (or the bike shop) could never find the source of. I'm not a light guy and do carry a bit of stuff in my day-to-day adventures, and I just felt that the tires weren't up to the task. If I was going to do more a path-racer/clubman style build and use the bike as just a riding bike, I might go with the Col de la Vies again. For now, I'm sticking to Delta Cruisers until we get those Paselas in 590!

desconhecido 03-25-15 10:40 PM


Originally Posted by adventurepdx (Post 17662850)
I also tried the Col de la Vies, and am not in the camp. I liked the look, and also felt it was pretty cush over rough/gravel. I felt that they rolled a bit faster than Delta Cruisers. My biggest issue with them was how...delicate they are. Pretty much no flat protection. I got tired of the numerous flats, especially a number of slow leaks that I (or the bike shop) could never find the source of. I'm not a light guy and do carry a bit of stuff in my day-to-day adventures, and I just felt that the tires weren't up to the task. If I was going to do more a path-racer/clubman style build and use the bike as just a riding bike, I might go with the Col de la Vies again. For now, I'm sticking to Delta Cruisers until we get those Paselas in 590!

In my estimation, the toughest tires in 590 are the Schwalbe Marathon Plus. I like 'em,and I like the way they look -- all black with a reflective stripe right along the rim line. They are pricey and not widely available (amazon shows them) and some people claim they are sluggish and heavy. I pump them up pretty high, which eliminates sluggish, and don't talk too much about heavy, for very obvious reasons.

gster 03-26-15 06:43 AM

Here in Toronto, Canadian Tire carries these Kenda brand tires. Reasonably priced for everyday riding.

https://youtu.be/1FzxSp9GxSM

adventurepdx 03-26-15 12:43 PM


Originally Posted by desconhecido (Post 17662927)
In my estimation, the toughest tires in 590 are the Schwalbe Marathon Plus. I like 'em,and I like the way they look -- all black with a reflective stripe right along the rim line. They are pricey and not widely available (amazon shows them) and some people claim they are sluggish and heavy. I pump them up pretty high, which eliminates sluggish, and don't talk too much about heavy, for very obvious reasons.

Yeah, Marathon Plus would be the toughest tires in 590, though I have to say that the Delta Cruisers are plenty tough enough for me.

And in the US, you can get any tire that Schwalbe makes for the American market (providing it's in stock) direct from Schwalbe USA. I bought some tires from them last year and paid just $6.50 for FedEx Ground Shipping. (May be more elsewhere, as Schwalbe USA is based in Ferndale, WA just north of Bellingham and I live in Portland.)
Marathon Plus, 42-590, Black-Reflex, Wire | Schwalbe North America

noglider 03-26-15 01:33 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 17659330)
I need a "3 speed" fix! My Prince Phillip(s) is pretty much done. Nothing more to do, but maybe upgrade the lightbulbs from Reflectalight. Emailed & they told me what front/rear bulb to get and the Xgen2 Regulator. Don't know if I want to spend the money for such an upgrade given that I'd likely use my modern battery lights at night anyway.

Have any of you done this with these particular bulbs?

Boy, it didn't take much to lure you into this world. While these mechanical projects are great, you might consider riding them in what otherwise would be your wrenching time.

noglider 03-26-15 01:35 PM

I have the Schwalbe Delta Cruisers in white on my Rudge. To my taste, they ride harshly. Maybe I overinflated them. And while I'm not a huge fan of Kenda, I was impressed with their ride on my friend's three-speed. I think it was the Kwest, but I could be wrong.

adventurepdx 03-26-15 02:19 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 17664532)
Boy, it didn't take much to lure you into this world. While these mechanical projects are great, you might consider riding them in what otherwise would be your wrenching time.

:)

And @velocivixen does have some opportunity to ride a three speed in Portland, like on a Three Speed Ride. ;)

My two cents: Rather than go through the trouble of retrofitting a retro light, get the B+M Retrotec LED dynamo light. Goes for about $60 new. Yes, I realize that it's not "authentic", but from ten feet away it doesn't look any different. And if you have a Dynohub, might as well use that dynamo lighting!

Maybe I'm just too much of a pragmatist, but when the option is between "keep the not-really-good authentic light and clip a modern battery light to the handlebars" and "get a good modern aesthetically correct LED dynamo lamp to use with the Dynohub", I go with the latter. You can always save the old lamp for a later project. Or for next year when Portland will actually get a winter! :D

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7611/...05581d1d85.jpg

noglider 03-26-15 02:21 PM

Good idea, @adventurepdx.

adventurepdx 03-26-15 02:21 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 17664537)
I have the Schwalbe Delta Cruisers in white on my Rudge. To my taste, they ride harshly. Maybe I overinflated them.

I found the sweet spot is somewhere around 55 psi, esp. if you have an alloy rim.

adventurepdx 03-26-15 02:28 PM

Inexpensive DL-1 on Portland Craigslist. Almost...too inexpensive. $120?
DL-1 Raleigh Tourist Bicycle
http://images.craigslist.org/00J0J_b...bF_600x450.jpg

Velocivixen 03-26-15 04:54 PM

@adventurepdx - Yeah, I wish I could have been on your 3 speed ride. For the next 6 months I'm not readily available on Saturdays before noon.
@noglider - yes, I like projects, and I have been riding...different ones of my bikes.

gster 03-26-15 05:33 PM


Originally Posted by adventurepdx (Post 17664689)
Inexpensive DL-1 on Portland Craigslist. Almost...too inexpensive. $120?
DL-1 Raleigh Tourist Bicycle
http://images.craigslist.org/00J0J_b...bF_600x450.jpg

Almost worth it just for the tires...

adventurepdx 03-26-15 09:33 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 17665058)
@adventurepdx - Yeah, I wish I could have been on your 3 speed ride. For the next 6 months I'm not readily available on Saturdays before noon.

Well, since the next ride is on a Sunday (June 21st), you'll have to find a different excuse! ;)

(and if I knew you could have made it later, I could have figured up a meeting spot, if you were into coming)

Velocivixen 03-26-15 09:43 PM


Originally Posted by adventurepdx (Post 17665719)
Well, since the next ride is on a Sunday (June 21st), you'll have to find a different excuse! ;)

(and if I knew you could have made it later, I could have figured up a meeting spot, if you were into coming)

Yes, but the 21st is Sunday Parkways. I usually go to those. However since I've missed your 3 speed ride, your gig would take precedence. Will want to take a closer look at how you hooked your wires to dynamo. I presume you had to cut the modern end off & attach metal hooks for where it bolts on to dynamo?

adventurepdx 03-26-15 10:02 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 17665731)
Yes, but the 21st is Sunday Parkways. I usually go to those. However since I've missed your 3 speed ride, your gig would take precedence.

Well then, it's...rather convenient that I scheduled the start of the Three Speed Ride at 4pm, which happens to be when Sunday Parkways ends! ;);) And it starts right on the Sunday Parkways route too.


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 17665731)
Will want to take a closer look at how you hooked your wires to dynamo. I presume you had to cut the modern end off & attach metal hooks for where it bolts on to dynamo?

I have a modern dynohub (horrors!) so I can't help you there.

desconhecido 03-26-15 10:57 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 17665731)
Yes, but the 21st is Sunday Parkways. I usually go to those. However since I've missed your 3 speed ride, your gig would take precedence. Will want to take a closer look at how you hooked your wires to dynamo. I presume you had to cut the modern end off & attach metal hooks for where it bolts on to dynamo?

Here is your solution:

http://m4.i.pbase.com/g3/84/622984/2...4.cHJtSJR2.jpg

You probably know 50 people with these connectors in their tool boxes, or you can get some at any auto parts store.

You can crimp them, but you already have soldering skills, shrink tubing, and a heat generating device which cannot be named. I prefer solder and heat shrink though I am not above crimping on occasion.

As to the "modern" end, the wires to the dyno light are without termination. When installing, you have to operate on the wires in order to attach to the connectors on the hub you are using. Both Schmidt and SON appear to use a spade lug connector which attaches either by crimping or soldering. Shimano hubs have a really outrageously stupidly designed connector which you can see:
http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/011...g?v=1383765090

Velocivixen 03-26-15 11:19 PM


Originally Posted by desconhecido (Post 17665828)
Here is your solution:

http://m4.i.pbase.com/g3/84/622984/2...4.cHJtSJR2.jpg

You probably know 50 people with these connectors in their tool boxes, or you can get some at any auto parts store.

You can crimp them, but you already have soldering skills, shrink tubing, and a heat generating device which cannot be named. I prefer solder and heat shrink though I am not above crimping on occasion.

As to the "modern" end, the wires to the dyno light are without termination. When installing, you have to operate on the wires in order to attach to the connectors on the hub you are using. Both Schmidt and SON appear to use a spade lug connector which attaches either by crimping or soldering. Shimano hubs have a really outrageously stupidly designed connector which you can see:
http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/011...g?v=1383765090

Thanks for that info. I don't know how to solder or have any soldering kits, although Radio Shack has some I believe. Took a class in Junior high school, jewelry making or something, where we learned how to solder, so It's not rocket science. I figured it would involve dissection the modern connector end and attaching something like you showed. Mine look like metal hooks. Don't have to take the nuts all the way off/on for attachment.

desconhecido 03-26-15 11:44 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 17665844)
Thanks for that info. I don't know how to solder or have any soldering kits, although Radio Shack has some I believe. Took a class in Junior high school, jewelry making or something, where we learned how to solder, so It's not rocket science. I figured it would involve dissection the modern connector end and attaching something like you showed. Mine look like metal hooks. Don't have to take the nuts all the way off/on for attachment.

Sorry for getting everything confused. Back when there was a discussion of terminating the shift cable in an elegant way, I thought that you were soldering it. It must have been somebody else.

If you don't have soldering tools suitable for electronics/electrical work, it wouldn't seem to me to make sense to buy some just to wire up a dynolight. Crimping is the solution. Search for crimp connectors or solderless connectors and you'll find a metric buttload of stuff.

If you do ever have the need and desire to get some tools for electronic soldering, stay away from Radio Shack. The nicest relatively low cost stuff is by Weller -- the little blue 25 or 40 watt irons will do most everything you'd probably ever want to do, as long as you aren't doing some surface mount stuff.

And no, it's not rocket science, but there is a bit of technique to soldering electrical components properly.

thumpism 03-27-15 08:28 AM

One shop I worked at had the policy of soldering the ends of cut cables instead of crimping on the little caps. Very clean and classy approach. We found a handy cordless soldering iron about the size of a carrot that could be left in its base plugged in to be charged and then removed for mobility and access to bikes. Actual soldering is not difficult; clean, flux and apply heat, but as the fellow above stated, soldering electrical stuff requires a little more diligence that usually involves heat sinks.

smontanaro 03-27-15 08:33 AM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 17666460)
One shop I worked at had the policy of soldering the ends of cut cables instead of crimping on the little caps.

Alas, soldering modern day stainless steel cables is more difficult than the old galvanized stuff we used to have. Nowadays, I just use super glue, applied and dried at the place where I want to cut the cable, but before the cut is made.

noglider 03-27-15 08:58 AM

I put these connectors inline with my dynamo hub so I wouldn't have to pull on the flimsy connector it came with.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...IL._SY450_.jpg

Slash5 03-27-15 09:12 AM

I have recently picked up a bike with a dynamo front hub. I think when I get to working on it, I'm going to find a weatherproof 2 pin connector for it, something like this.
http://www.amazon.ca/Waterproof-Elec.../dp/B00DNVC68W

I'm constantly surprised at these 3 speeds on how difficult it is to remove a wheel. Not sure how people managed with flat repairs back in the day.

noglider 03-27-15 11:35 AM


Originally Posted by Slash5 (Post 17666634)
I'm constantly surprised at these 3 speeds on how difficult it is to remove a wheel. Not sure how people managed with flat repairs back in the day.

I guess I'm used to them, because I don't find it hard. What gives you troubles?

Slash5 03-27-15 12:25 PM

I guess I'm just used to quick release.
Pulling a front wheel means winding the front nuts all the way off so the fender struts can be removed, unscrewing the dynamo leads and/or removing the front hub drum cable.
Rear wheel has the nuts, shift cable and maybe brake clip. Re-installing is the same plus adjusting the chain and maybe the shifter.
Seems like it would be a pain on the side of the road.

And to make it worse, I'm used to removing the front wheel on my bikes to transport and to put in my basement. Even if I do remove the front wheel, the fender is still there.
I might have to break down and get a bike rack of some sort.

desconhecido 03-27-15 12:28 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 17667117)
I guess I'm used to them, because I don't find it hard. What gives you troubles?

First, no quick release. On the rear, you've got a flat axle that has to be oriented, you need to be careful that you don't upset the bearing adjustment when you tighten up the axle nuts -- maybe this won't happen on the rear because of the flat axle and the cone washers. It's easier with two wrenches rather than one. On the front, there is typically some sort of axle retention -- the predecessor to lawyer lips -- and, depending on the style, you may have to spread the forks a bit to get the axle in and lined up. The forks on a Sports are stiff and it's a pita. The 51 we have is like that -- the cone lock nuts have little shoulders on them that nest into round recesses cut in the fork end. The 51, also, doesn't have the fixed cone on one side of the axle and it's easy to get axle rotation with respect to one or both cones as you tighten the nuts. So, I use a cone wrench to keep everything correct. Three wrenches, two axle nuts, two hands. It's not hard to do, just a bit more tedious.

noglider 03-27-15 12:31 PM

I guess I agree about the front wheel, but I have no trouble with the rear. The cone has a locknut, so the bearing adjustment doesn't go out on me. But I have a ton of practice. I was a shop mechanic starting in 1978, and there were still a lot of people riding 3-speeds, so I fixed a lot of flats in those days. I could probably do them with my eyes closed, at least on the rear. And of course, most flats occur on the rear.

Maybe I should make a video of how I do it. I can also adjust the gear cable with my eyes closed, truly and literally.

Salubrious 03-27-15 01:07 PM

Its also handy to have the right wrench and just keep it in the saddle bag or the like that every British 3-speed has if it knows whats good for it. I was on the Lake Pepin 3-speed tour a couple of years ago and a gent on that ride was selling wrenches that had the two most common Whitworth nut sizes used on the bike- you can deal with the seat, wheels and stem all with one tool.

nlerner 03-27-15 02:07 PM

This is the indispensable Raleigh 3-speed tool in my kit:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-o...%257E60_57.JPG

slowtostart 03-27-15 02:15 PM

It's not a three speed, but is English and lives in the barn with several others. She is my first, a well appointed 1974 ivory Sprite. Paint, chrome, and decals are better than average. She features a dynohub with working front and rear lights, an Huret speedometer, massive Raleigh branded bell, pedals, original grips and front and rear racks. Everything has been gone over and she rolls new tires. She fits her owner and now sports pretty panniers.

Not including the tires and panniers, I have about $25 invested. I rarely take her to town now, but wonder if a new bar, not the adult beverage kind, makeover might give her a more unique function.

Please read between my lines. How might I give her an "other" function/aesthetic edge over the 3 speeds?

STS


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