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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

3speedslow 10-22-21 01:32 PM

Weather today!

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...a85a9ad1a.jpeg

clubman 10-22-21 01:48 PM


Originally Posted by 3speedslow (Post 22279385)
Weather today!

We hit 24 celsius today! That's 74 for the uninitiated.

3speedslow 10-22-21 02:00 PM

I would have been hit by more then 74 of those hail nuggets if I was out there trying the mud guards out!

SirMike1983 10-22-21 02:49 PM

The Schwinn bikes have a little more laid back frame than the Raleigh Sports. Many of the Schwinn 3-speeds have a more "cruiser-like" quality in that they have more laid back frames, heavier frames, and bigger handlebars. The Schwinn is kind of an "Americanized three speed" in that sense, but both the post-war Schwinn and the post-war Raleigh clearly come from a common ancestor in the form of the 1930s-era light roadsters made by Raleigh, Hercules, Phillips, etc. The Schwinn is a 3-speed that evolved with American taste applied, whereas the Raleigh kept a more British feel. Schwinn was faster to adopt international parts, such as Weinmann aluminum brakes and levers. Keep in mind they both are 26 inch wheels, but the Schwinns use a special tire size at 597mm bead seat, so tire choice is more limited with the Schwinn.

Salubrious 10-22-21 03:27 PM


Fun facts dept.:
The bike mentioned that made the Iceland crossing in 1933 was a Raleigh Roadster with an enclosed chaincase, running a type K three speed hub.

Greg R 10-22-21 07:53 PM


The Schwinn is a 3-speed that evolved with American taste applied, whereas the Raleigh kept a more British feel.
Hopefully I can figure out those feels in a couple of weeks. Tomorrow I am going to look at a Raleigh Sport and a Churchill De Luxe. The pictures show a very good cosmetic condition, little to no rust so fingers crossed.

gster 10-23-21 05:38 AM


Originally Posted by vintagebicycle (Post 22278571)
Usually when I find one like that I just pull the hub apart and go through it completely.
It saves surprises later down the road and isn't that hard to do. I've found quite a few broken pawl springs, stuck pawls, and bad bearing surfaces just doing a simple tear down and reassemble.
At 40+ years old, it certainly can't hurt anything.

Before I understood and appreciated these bikes, I packed a hub with grease....
I learned my lesson and then did my research.
I've since worked on at least 50 3 speed hubs and can honestly say I've only
encountered 2 that had real problems
-warped axle (this was the one I had previously packed with grease)
-a very worn sun gear (hub was adjusted too tight)
I've had good results from flushing a hub
-varsol flush x 2
-vinegar flush x 2
-boiling water
let it dry out and then put in some oil.
There are some good youtube videos showing a disassembly,
cleaning and a rebuild.
Someone else here had a good trick of making
new springs out of guitar strings....
Once cleaned and rebuilt and adjusted properly,
a hub should be good for another 50 years.

39cross 10-23-21 09:04 AM

My wife has a Sprite that looks like it's the 1970 5-speed freewheel model. It originally had an Allvit that died somewhere along the line, now it sports a Shimano Eagle II. She'd like to replace the rubber blocks on the pedals, they are very worn and slippery, but it looks like the only place I can find sells pricey repros on eBay out of Thailand. So perhaps some new but similar looking pedals are what she needs. From what I've read the cranks should take a 9/16" pedal, but these pedals, it turns out are some odd sort of size. A 15mm wrench was too small, as well. I found a 5/8" wrench was needed. A 9/16" pedal will partially screw in, but of course not completely. I've been doing some searches but I haven't been able to find any more info on odd-ball thread pedal sizes. I have some 9/16" taps and was thinking of just re-tapping the threads on the crank arms. Is there any potential issue with this?

Here's a photo of the original pedals. Thanks for reading.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...569050bbcc.jpg

gster 10-23-21 02:58 PM


Originally Posted by 39cross (Post 22280182)
My wife has a Sprite that looks like it's the 1970 5-speed freewheel model. It originally had an Allvit that died somewhere along the line, now it sports a Shimano Eagle II. She'd like to replace the rubber blocks on the pedals, they are very worn and slippery, but it looks like the only place I can find sells pricey repros on eBay out of Thailand. So perhaps some new but similar looking pedals are what she needs. From what I've read the cranks should take a 9/16" pedal, but these pedals, it turns out are some odd sort of size. A 15mm wrench was too small, as well. I found a 5/8" wrench was needed. A 9/16" pedal will partially screw in, but of course not completely. I've been doing some searches but I haven't been able to find any more info on odd-ball thread pedal sizes. I have some 9/16" taps and was thinking of just re-tapping the threads on the crank arms. Is there any potential issue with this?

Here's a photo of the original pedals. Thanks for reading.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...569050bbcc.jpg

MKS make a very nice rubber pedal
MKS 3000/3000R
https://www.amazon.com/MKS-Pedal-300.../dp/B009YZ46KC
shop around for a good price

dirtman 10-23-21 04:21 PM


Originally Posted by 39cross (Post 22280182)
My wife has a Sprite that looks like it's the 1970 5-speed freewheel model. It originally had an Allvit that died somewhere along the line, now it sports a Shimano Eagle II. She'd like to replace the rubber blocks on the pedals, they are very worn and slippery, but it looks like the only place I can find sells pricey repros on eBay out of Thailand. So perhaps some new but similar looking pedals are what she needs. From what I've read the cranks should take a 9/16" pedal, but these pedals, it turns out are some odd sort of size. A 15mm wrench was too small, as well. I found a 5/8" wrench was needed. A 9/16" pedal will partially screw in, but of course not completely. I've been doing some searches but I haven't been able to find any more info on odd-ball thread pedal sizes. I have some 9/16" taps and was thinking of just re-tapping the threads on the crank arms. Is there any potential issue with this?

Here's a photo of the original pedals. Thanks for reading.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...569050bbcc.jpg

What your describing sounds like 9/16" threaded pedals trying to go into French, 14x1.25mm threaded cranks but I've never seen French threaded cranks on a Raleigh, especially in 1970. It maybe possible that someone swapped in a set of French cranks though.

According to Sheldon Brown's site, you can retap French threads to 9/16" but in my opinion, the two are too close in size for the 9/16" tap to really cut clean threads.
The problem with that thinking is that those pedals appear to be original Sir Raleigh scripted.

In metric, 9/16" x 20tpi thread would be 14.28mm x 1.27 compared to French 14mm x 1.25. You have to look close to see the difference on a thread pitch gauge,
The only other pedal thread size is 1/2", which is noticeably smaller.

Since you had Raleigh pedals, I'd strongly suspect that your crank arms simply need the threads cleaned up a bit with a tap or thread chaser.
.

Greg R 10-23-21 08:27 PM

I just went through those pedals on my wife's Raleigh Colt (1976?) Being British, wrench sizes are different though a 15mm thin cone wrench worked perfect on mine. Measuring mine the stubs appear to be 14mm diameter with a 1.25 thread.. They seem original to her bike and have the Raleigh Heron logo on them as well as the arms. I would get the blocks and relube the ball bearings in them. They come apart and are easy to clean and lube. If you do rethread, hope you have the correct drill, tap and feel for it and remember one is a Left Hand thread.

thumpism 10-24-21 05:04 AM

Turista 22" for $100 in GA.

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...59801128235705

https://scontent.fric1-1.fna.fbcdn.n...e2&oe=617B1977

thumpism 10-24-21 05:26 AM

Bunch o' 3-speeds in Hudson Valley NY with a helluva price break; $80 each or $50 each if you buy five or more. Seller has dozens. Get going!

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...89595829239464

https://scontent.fric1-2.fna.fbcdn.n...28&oe=6199B075

gster 10-24-21 07:43 AM

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...7e3f74b306.jpg
Wishful Thinking
Here's a Toronto DL-1 for sale with an asking price of $600.00..

Ballenxj 10-24-21 08:01 AM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 22279544)
Fun facts dept.:
The bike mentioned that made the Iceland crossing in 1933 was a Raleigh Roadster with an enclosed chaincase, running a type K three speed hub.

That was an interesting video, thanks for posting. :thumb:

SirMike1983 10-25-21 08:36 AM


Originally Posted by Greg R (Post 22279799)
Hopefully I can figure out those feels in a couple of weeks. Tomorrow I am going to look at a Raleigh Sport and a Churchill De Luxe. The pictures show a very good cosmetic condition, little to no rust so fingers crossed.

I think you have it right. I go out and try different bikes and see what you prefer. You can still get something like a 1960s-era Raleigh Sports or Schwinn Racer without spending a ton of money. Stuff from the 1950s and earlier tends to cost a bit more usually because of collector interest, though sometimes you strike a deal. But you can get the idea of how each bike feels with a relatively inexpensive 1960s or 70s era bike.

The Raleigh Sports will have a feel that everything is "closer together": the frame is a little tighter angle, with more compact handlebars, more compact stem, shorter reach from the seat to the bars. The Schwinn will have the feel that you're sitting back a little more, often with longer bars and a more pronounced stem. The front wheel on the Schwinn feels like it's a little more "out front of you". The Raleigh frame tends to be a little lighter and (for a lack of a better word) livelier, whereas the Schwinn welded Schwinn frame will tend to be heavier and tends to deaden bumps a bit more. If you have the space, there's no harm in having one of each. The 1960s-70s era models tend to be affordable still. They don't have the cachet of a 1940s-50s bike, but if you're just trying them out, they're serviceable and attractive bikes still.

Salubrious 10-25-21 10:19 AM


Originally Posted by 39cross (Post 22280182)
My wife has a Sprite that looks like it's the 1970 5-speed freewheel model. It originally had an Allvit that died somewhere along the line, now it sports a Shimano Eagle II. She'd like to replace the rubber blocks on the pedals, they are very worn and slippery, but it looks like the only place I can find sells pricey repros on eBay out of Thailand. So perhaps some new but similar looking pedals are what she needs. From what I've read the cranks should take a 9/16" pedal, but these pedals, it turns out are some odd sort of size. A 15mm wrench was too small, as well. I found a 5/8" wrench was needed. A 9/16" pedal will partially screw in, but of course not completely. I've been doing some searches but I haven't been able to find any more info on odd-ball thread pedal sizes. I have some 9/16" taps and was thinking of just re-tapping the threads on the crank arms. Is there any potential issue with this?

Here's a photo of the original pedals. Thanks for reading.

You just need to clean up the threads- they are the correct pitch. You've got dirt or rust (probably both) interfering. Those pedals in the photo are rebuildable and easily serviced. If you can find a set of blocks on ebay (usually about $15.00) you could cut them down to size to fit the narrower women's pedals.


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 22280665)
According to Sheldon Brown's site, you can retap French threads to 9/16" but in my opinion, the two are too close in size for the 9/16" tap to really cut clean threads.
The problem with that thinking is that those pedals appear to be original Sir Raleigh scripted.
.

French and English threads are the same pitch so tapping French cranks really isn't a problem. The difference is that the French thread is very so slightly less diameter. So French pedals thread loose in English cranks and English pedals simply won't go into French threads at all.

Greg R 10-25-21 11:06 AM

I'll bet dollars to donuts he's got a 14mm 1.25 thread. They look perzactly like the ones off of our Raleigh Colt which have that size. One thing I've found working with old bikes is having a couple of bolt or thread sizing plates and a pitch gauge. Those two tools have saved me a lot of guessing and potential costly mistakes. As a test, try screwing in a standard automotive/ small engine spark plug. If it threads correctly in the crank arm, even a tad loose, it's 14mm.

strichzwei 10-25-21 07:31 PM

Hi, I have a 1973 Raleigh sport, can someone tell me if I should have 9 or 10 ball bearings per side in the front hub.
For some reason I ended up with an extra 3/16th ball bearing, I put 9 each in the front hub and even went back and opened up the rear 3 speed hub I rebuilt to ensure I had 24 ball bearings in the ball cup (they are also 3/16th).
From what little I could find it appears there are only 9 on each side of the front hub.
Can someone definitively confirm this?
thanks,
Scott

oldspokes 10-25-21 07:56 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 22278743)

There's been a '65 Speedster in coaster brake with chrome fenders for sale on CL here for a while now.
I bought a taller version of the same bike off the guy back in the spring. I was expecting a project but the thing had been gone over front to back and needed nothing at all.
If the one for sale now is the same one he had then, it had perfect chrome, no rust and was very much ready to ride.

https://southjersey.craigslist.org/bop/d/65-racer/7397033743.html

I probably should have bought both mine and this one. Mine had the same white Schwinn 'mattress' saddle and white grips, which sold on fleabay for more than I paid for the bike. I replaced mine with color matching grips. Mine even still had the original Schwinn branded tires on it.

oldspokes 10-25-21 08:07 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 22282469)
I think you have it right. I go out and try different bikes and see what you prefer. You can still get something like a 1960s-era Raleigh Sports or Schwinn Racer without spending a ton of money. Stuff from the 1950s and earlier tends to cost a bit more usually because of collector interest, though sometimes you strike a deal. But you can get the idea of how each bike feels with a relatively inexpensive 1960s or 70s era bike.

The Raleigh Sports will have a feel that everything is "closer together": the frame is a little tighter angle, with more compact handlebars, more compact stem, shorter reach from the seat to the bars. The Schwinn will have the feel that you're sitting back a little more, often with longer bars and a more pronounced stem. The front wheel on the Schwinn feels like it's a little more "out front of you". The Raleigh frame tends to be a little lighter and (for a lack of a better word) livelier, whereas the Schwinn welded Schwinn frame will tend to be heavier and tends to deaden bumps a bit more. If you have the space, there's no harm in having one of each. The 1960s-70s era models tend to be affordable still. They don't have the cachet of a 1940s-50s bike, but if you're just trying them out, they're serviceable and attractive bikes still.

This is a very good description of how each bike feels, I own several of each and both have their advantages. I tend to keep a few single speed Schwinn bikes around, and always a few Raleigh or other brand English bikes around. Currently I've got an early 60's Traveler, in a 24" frame, in three speed trim, one early 50's Traveler, I believe its a '52,, also a three speed, and a '67 and '70 Racer in coaster brake. That on top of a dozen or more English three speeds, most all are 23 or 24" frame models.
In general, the English bikes feel more nimble, they feel shorter than they are. Especially if your stepping off a Schwinn and onto a Raleigh. For me, the Raleigh is an easier bike to ride over longer distances, its both lighter, easier to handle, and easier on my old knees.

SirMike1983 10-25-21 09:15 PM


Originally Posted by oldspokes (Post 22283586)
This is a very good description of how each bike feels, I own several of each and both have their advantages. I tend to keep a few single speed Schwinn bikes around, and always a few Raleigh or other brand English bikes around. Currently I've got an early 60's Traveler, in a 24" frame, in three speed trim, one early 50's Traveler, I believe its a '52,, also a three speed, and a '67 and '70 Racer in coaster brake. That on top of a dozen or more English three speeds, most all are 23 or 24" frame models.
In general, the English bikes feel more nimble, they feel shorter than they are. Especially if your stepping off a Schwinn and onto a Raleigh. For me, the Raleigh is an easier bike to ride over longer distances, its both lighter, easier to handle, and easier on my old knees.

That's a pretty good collection. The earlier Schwinns from before the 1960s are not easy to find, and the tall Schwinn frames are tough to find as well. It seems like the Raleighs are a little easier to find, but a tall frame in either brand is a nice plus.

My feeling is that the majority people tend to prefer the Raleigh because it's maybe a little more familiar coming from a modern bike or a road bike, or an old 10-speed. The people who seem to like the Schwinn are the ones who have a beach cruiser or ballooner, or middleweight already and want a sportier vintage bike. But that's not a very big fraction compared to people who come from modern bikes or road bikes. The fraction coming over from single-speed or two-speed American ballooners or middleweights who prefer the Schwinn feel is pretty small today. At least that has been my experience fooling with these old things. I'd feel kind of lost without at least one of each type around, but that's me.

oldspokes 10-26-21 02:06 AM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 22283643)
That's a pretty good collection. The earlier Schwinns from before the 1960s are not easy to find, and the tall Schwinn frames are tough to find as well. It seems like the Raleighs are a little easier to find, but a tall frame in either brand is a nice plus.

My feeling is that the majority people tend to prefer the Raleigh because it's maybe a little more familiar coming from a modern bike or a road bike, or an old 10-speed. The people who seem to like the Schwinn are the ones who have a beach cruiser or ballooner, or middleweight already and want a sportier vintage bike. But that's not a very big fraction compared to people who come from modern bikes or road bikes. The fraction coming over from single-speed or two-speed American ballooners or middleweights who prefer the Schwinn feel is pretty small today. At least that has been my experience fooling with these old things. I'd feel kind of lost without at least one of each type around, but that's me.

At 6ft 3in tall, I need a large frame bike and the middle weights are generally too small for me to ride comfortably. I've got two, both late 50's, one American, one Corvette, and bits and pieces of a Phantom that someone stripped down for newsboy duty years ago.
My newest Schwinn is a 72 Speedster, also a single speed coaster brake, and the oldest is my 52 Traveler. The '52 is the only one that's not a 24" frame, but for some reason the differences in those older models sit taller than most. My '72 Speedster sits taller than all the others, I never really looked close to see why, the forks and frame shouldn't be much different then the same frame size Racers or my '62 Traveler. I also just picked up a really rough '62 Traveler in 24", I'm not sure what I'll do with it, I grabbed it thinking of it as spare parts but after digging into a bit I think I can save it with lots of cleaning, some rust removal, and likely a set of forks. (The threaded portion of the forks is snapped off, someone brain surgeon welded it, thus no more threads, and thus, welded on the bearing cone, nut, and stem. The wheels were perfect though with a minty set of Western Flyer S5 tires. (The old square, flat, sawtooth tread pattern with the huge sidewall flutes around the edges). That bike came with a box of other bits and pieces and a couple spare sets of three speed wheels in nice condition. Maybe one of my Racers will get a three speed set up down the road. I had an earlier Schwinn 'New World' with a single speed freewheel and calipers, but it weighed a ton, I cleaned it up, got it into fair shape, rode it a few times and sold it. It felt like I was dragging a cinder block all the time. The guy who bought it has it hanging over his pool table in his game room.

All but two of my English bikes are tall frames, I have two mid 60's Robin Hood Sports, one is a tiny frame, only 19", I keep it for a loaner. The other, a black Sports model has been with me for 45+ years now. I have four Raleigh Sports, a '59, '62, '69, and '78, all 23" frames, One Dunelt, a 1962, in 22", and one in 23", a Philips in 23" with a coaster brake, two Gazelle's in 22" both three speeds, and a 23" Raleigh LTD. Plus a BSA and a Norman that are both completely apart awaiting both a few parts and my time.
My basement is half wood shop, half bike shop these days.
On top of that, I'm going to pick up a baker's dozen of older bikes in two weeks that a buddy bought at an estate sale, 8 out the 12 are English, two are French, one Rollfast, and two Schwinn's. All three speed style bikes. He bought the lot only because they lumped everything in the garage at the sale together after not being able to get a bid on the bikes. He was only after the riding mower and chainsaw in the lot. The deal is a 30 pack of beer for the bikes if I want them, they're about 70 miles away.
I'll just have to make some more room in the basement I guess and plan for a few more winter projects.

For me, my English bikes seem to ride nicer, they roll along easier and are easier to maneuver at slower speeds, but a lot that is because they tend to get better tires. With good original tires or what ever Kenda sells these days as the only choices, the Schwinn tires are pretty limited. Also, a good 65psi tire will roll better than a cheap 45 psi tire.
I wish someone would bring out a decent tire for the S5 rims but I doubt that's very likely.
Finding good chrome is also getting harder for both brands these days.

FBOATSB 10-26-21 06:59 AM


Originally Posted by strichzwei (Post 22283543)
Hi, I have a 1973 Raleigh sport, can someone tell me if I should have 9 or 10 ball bearings per side in the front hub.
For some reason I ended up with an extra 3/16th ball bearing, I put 9 each in the front hub and even went back and opened up the rear 3 speed hub I rebuilt to ensure I had 24 ball bearings in the ball cup (they are also 3/16th).
From what little I could find it appears there are only 9 on each side of the front hub.
Can someone definitively confirm this?
thanks,
Scott

My '74 Raleigh Sports has 3/16 balls at 10 per side in the front hub if that helps. Other much more knowledgeable folks can address your rear hub.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...97e81f07dd.jpg

SirMike1983 10-26-21 07:12 AM

Tire availability is not an issue to overlook. I run the Kendas on my Schwinn 3-speeds at 65 PSI, and they support that well enough. They're not a bad tire, but they're also not a truly good tire either. My Raleigh Sports bikes have Schwalbe Delta Cruisier white walls or Panaracer tan walls. Going from a Kenda up a notch or two to a better tire is well worth it because it immediately improves just about every aspect of how the bike rides. I'd love a set of Schwalbe white walls in the Schwinn size. It is possible to convert some of the old Schwinns to CR-18 rims, which I did with my wife's 3-speed Schwinn. She still preferred her modern, aluminum road bike though.


Originally Posted by oldspokes (Post 22283761)
At 6ft 3in tall, I need a large frame bike and the middle weights are generally too small for me to ride comfortably. I've got two, both late 50's, one American, one Corvette, and bits and pieces of a Phantom that someone stripped down for newsboy duty years ago.
My newest Schwinn is a 72 Speedster, also a single speed coaster brake, and the oldest is my 52 Traveler. The '52 is the only one that's not a 24" frame, but for some reason the differences in those older models sit taller than most. My '72 Speedster sits taller than all the others, I never really looked close to see why, the forks and frame shouldn't be much different then the same frame size Racers or my '62 Traveler. I also just picked up a really rough '62 Traveler in 24", I'm not sure what I'll do with it, I grabbed it thinking of it as spare parts but after digging into a bit I think I can save it with lots of cleaning, some rust removal, and likely a set of forks. (The threaded portion of the forks is snapped off, someone brain surgeon welded it, thus no more threads, and thus, welded on the bearing cone, nut, and stem. The wheels were perfect though with a minty set of Western Flyer S5 tires. (The old square, flat, sawtooth tread pattern with the huge sidewall flutes around the edges). That bike came with a box of other bits and pieces and a couple spare sets of three speed wheels in nice condition. Maybe one of my Racers will get a three speed set up down the road. I had an earlier Schwinn 'New World' with a single speed freewheel and calipers, but it weighed a ton, I cleaned it up, got it into fair shape, rode it a few times and sold it. It felt like I was dragging a cinder block all the time. The guy who bought it has it hanging over his pool table in his game room.

All but two of my English bikes are tall frames, I have two mid 60's Robin Hood Sports, one is a tiny frame, only 19", I keep it for a loaner. The other, a black Sports model has been with me for 45+ years now. I have four Raleigh Sports, a '59, '62, '69, and '78, all 23" frames, One Dunelt, a 1962, in 22", and one in 23", a Philips in 23" with a coaster brake, two Gazelle's in 22" both three speeds, and a 23" Raleigh LTD. Plus a BSA and a Norman that are both completely apart awaiting both a few parts and my time.
My basement is half wood shop, half bike shop these days.
On top of that, I'm going to pick up a baker's dozen of older bikes in two weeks that a buddy bought at an estate sale, 8 out the 12 are English, two are French, one Rollfast, and two Schwinn's. All three speed style bikes. He bought the lot only because they lumped everything in the garage at the sale together after not being able to get a bid on the bikes. He was only after the riding mower and chainsaw in the lot. The deal is a 30 pack of beer for the bikes if I want them, they're about 70 miles away.
I'll just have to make some more room in the basement I guess and plan for a few more winter projects.

For me, my English bikes seem to ride nicer, they roll along easier and are easier to maneuver at slower speeds, but a lot that is because they tend to get better tires. With good original tires or what ever Kenda sells these days as the only choices, the Schwinn tires are pretty limited. Also, a good 65psi tire will roll better than a cheap 45 psi tire.
I wish someone would bring out a decent tire for the S5 rims but I doubt that's very likely.
Finding good chrome is also getting harder for both brands these days.


39cross 10-26-21 08:16 AM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 22282649)
You just need to clean up the threads- they are the correct pitch. You've got dirt or rust (probably both) interfering. Those pedals in the photo are rebuildable and easily serviced. If you can find a set of blocks on ebay (usually about $15.00) you could cut them down to size to fit the narrower women's pedals.
French and English threads are the same pitch so tapping French cranks really isn't a problem. The difference is that the French thread is very so slightly less diameter. So French pedals thread loose in English cranks and English pedals simply won't go into French threads at all.

Thank you and all the other folks who replied. It occurred to me that I could try threading the pedals into a modern crankset to see if they would fit, if indeed they are 9/16". They threaded in perfectly to a set of 105 9-speed cranks. So I think you are right, the threads in the Sprite's need to be cleaned up. But in the meantime my wife has decided she wants to keep the originals on the bike, so I'm going to find the blocks and go that route. There is a nice video on YouTube where someone rebuilds these same pedals. He also mentions he had to use a larger 5/8 wrench to remove them. The video is
in case anyone's interested.

Thank again!
-Rick

3speedslow 10-26-21 08:18 AM

Continuing to tinker with the 79 faux Roadster. This time a cable change from bottom tube to top. Lesson on tube sizes had me digging in the bin for a smaller clamp for the ferrel.

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2404536e0.jpeg
More changes later, lots of riding.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...dc3d74c4b.jpeg
Finally found my supply of metal Ferrel to replace the scorchers crumbling part.

Greg R 10-26-21 11:14 AM


From what little I could find it appears there are only 9 on each side of the front hub.
Can someone definitively confirm this?
I'm going through a Sport right now that I've recently purchased. There are indeed 9 ea. 3/16" balls per side. A rule of thumb I've found here for ball space is the number of balls to fill +1. Usually that "last" +1 one won't fit all the way so the space left when stacked together gives adequate spacing when they spread out from rotating in an assembled hub.


My '74 Raleigh Sports has 3/16 balls at 10 per side
You have a Sturmey Archer hub. Looking at the races on the hub cones, there's some spall damage. Too tight? Too many balls?

strichzwei 10-26-21 11:41 AM

My front hub also says "Sturmey Archer" on it.....
thanks guys.
Scott

Greg R 10-26-21 12:55 PM

Skool me on Raleigh pedal threads. I've been reading it's 9/16", some might say 14mm. What did Raleigh actually have in the 1970s? I measured the stubs on 2 different bikes. A 76 Colt and a new to me 72/73 Sports. They measured .551" which is 14mm exact no decimal points. A metric thread pitch gauge showed 1.25 mm and a fractional showed 20 TPI; but the metric one engaged better fully into the threads where the fractional one just lined up along thread crests. Eyeballing they seem similar but what I'm seeing with a mike is the Raleigh has metric threaded pedals and crank arms. With that I can fully screw in an automotive spark plug with no slop or binding. Then there's the wrenches. I have several, a couple of thin bike wrenches and a couple of regular combo 15mm that fit perfectly versus 5/8 folks seem to use that seem loosey and could round corners on a rusty stubborn one.

If it was 9/16, it sure isn't in the 70s. At .562" an .011" difference is too fat.


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