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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

dirtman 12-23-21 11:30 AM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 22348524)
Yes.

Its not that hard to change the threaded cog though. You will need a sturdy bit of metal that can be placed in a vice. The handle of a spanner will do nicely. You place the driver on the handle of the spanner so that it is kept still. You'll need a 'chain whip' which is a handle with a bit of chain attached. You can get such a tool from Park Tools, used for removing cogs from track bike hubs. The tricky bit is that the chain will have to be changed out with a length that fits your cog. I found that was not difficult.
https://www.parktool.com/product/spr...n-whip-sr-12-2
I had to play with some small washers when I mounted the wider chain for the cog to the tool.

Surly has a handsome 22T cog. Its shiny but fits inside the chaincase so it can't be seen.

Easy with the right tools.

A little bit of heat works wonders too for the stubborn one's. (I don't mean take a torch to it, just warm it up, often a hair drier is all it takes).
I generally take a propane torch and warm the sprocket up just enough that its too warm to hold onto comfortably, then set the driver on the bar or old wrench and remove it with the chain whip. You don't want to turn it colors, just heat it up enough that there's a temperature difference between the driver and the sprocket. I've had a few that wouldn't even think of moving come right off by simply applying a bit of heat.
Heat only the sprocket, not the driver or the bar your going to use to hold it with. The sprocket will expand just a bit making it easier to remove.

cudak888 12-23-21 04:48 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 22349288)
Nothing to do with vintage bikes

Streamline train in downtown Syracuse

British bike thread needs some streamlined LNER content.

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...250c5a4370.jpg

Now back to the regularly scheduled programming with a Class 290, demonstrating two of the best forms of transportation in one picture.

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...21eed454ae.jpg


-Kurt

bluesteak 12-23-21 08:17 PM


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 22349417)
A little bit of heat works wonders too for the stubborn one's. (I don't mean take a torch to it, just warm it up, often a hair drier is all it takes).
I generally take a propane torch and warm the sprocket up just enough that its too warm to hold onto comfortably, then set the driver on the bar or old wrench and remove it with the chain whip. You don't want to turn it colors, just heat it up enough that there's a temperature difference between the driver and the sprocket. I've had a few that wouldn't even think of moving come right off by simply applying a bit of heat.
Heat only the sprocket, not the driver or the bar your going to use to hold it with. The sprocket will expand just a bit making it easier to remove.

You folks never answered my question. I donít have a large enough vise. And want to harvest a non threaded driver from another hub to put in my AB hub. What hubs can I use?

JohnDThompson 12-23-21 09:10 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 22348524)
Its not that hard to change the threaded cog though. You will need a sturdy bit of metal that can be placed in a vice. The handle of a spanner will do nicely. You place the driver on the handle of the spanner so that it is kept still. You'll need a 'chain whip' which is a handle with a bit of chain attached. You can get such a tool from Park Tools, used for removing cogs from track bike hubs.

Not necessarily "easy," if the sprocket has been on the driver for more than half a century, as is often the case. But judicious application of penetrating oil, heat, and leverage will eventually do the trick.

thumpism 12-24-21 08:02 AM

Here's a Twenty for 35 in NJ.

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...61954984377291

https://scontent.fric1-2.fna.fbcdn.n...VA&oe=61CBBAC2

cudak888 12-24-21 10:20 AM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 22350299)
Here's a Twenty for 35 in NJ.

That el-cheapo seatpost is $35 at most LBSes.

-Kurt

Salubrious 12-24-21 11:08 AM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 22350008)
You folks never answered my question. I donít have a large enough vise. And want to harvest a non threaded driver from another hub to put in my AB hub. What hubs can I use?

You can use any driver from any A hub- AW or AG. They have been interchangeable since the A hubs were introduced.

markk900 12-24-21 11:11 AM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 22350008)
You folks never answered my question. I donít have a large enough vise. And want to harvest a non threaded driver from another hub to put in my AB hub. What hubs can I use?

i thought I did answer (though not with conviction as I havenít tried it myself): it appears all the Ax series hubs shared drivers and since itís a quick change you can try one from any AW hub you have - it should go together quite easily.

gster 12-24-21 04:20 PM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 22350299)

I thought 15 got you 20....

thumpism 12-24-21 08:54 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 22350799)
I thought 15 got you 20....

Varies by state, YMMV, etc.

BigChief 12-26-21 11:10 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 22349288)
Nothing to do with vintage bikes
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...88ce3404d1.jpg
Streamline train in downtown Syracuse

Nice! Love those art deco designs. I lived along the Pennsylvania RR as a kid and will never forget how impressive these GG1s were blasting by.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d3cb4fbec5.jpg

gster 12-26-21 11:50 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 22352001)
Nice! Love those art deco designs. I lived along the Pennsylvania RR as a kid and will never forget how impressive these GG1s were blasting by.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d3cb4fbec5.jpg

Big Chief !!
Glad to see you back.
I was getting worried as you hadn't posted for a while.
My grandparents house backed onto the train tracks and we would spend hours counting cars....

jkrug 12-26-21 12:34 PM

Finished this brown Raleigh Sports and sold it to a neighbor just in time for a Christmas present for her husband. He'll use it as a town commuter. Had to remind him to ease up on the pedal to shift. Had to switch out the original leather Brooks--it looked like a desert cow skull when I got the bike.

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6dfd16210a.jpg

thumpism 12-26-21 06:48 PM

Moulton with a Sturmey 4-speed. $325 in NY.

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...38051979875989

https://scontent.fric1-2.fna.fbcdn.n...xA&oe=61CD6EF9

clubman 12-26-21 07:16 PM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 22352339)

Shame about the bent fork. It'll take a skilled frame guy to straighten it out but it's got alloy rims as a bonus. A good project for $100 less.

capnjonny 12-27-21 12:03 AM

I"m working on a Raleigh Space Rider at the moment. Almost finished except the 3 speed S/A hub won't shift. The chain that goes into the axle doesn't move at all. Short of disassembling the hub is there any way recommended to free up the shifting chain.
I thought I might flood the hub with penetrating oil then flush with alcohol or acetone and refill with oil.
Will this work or make matters worse?

vintagebicycle 12-27-21 03:50 AM


Originally Posted by cudak888 (Post 22349833)
............................ ................................................ .....................

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...21eed454ae.jpg


-Kurt

Is anyone else thinking about how hot that bike is getting hanging on the front of the boiler like that? I can just picture all the grease dripping out of the bb and hubs as it hangs there.
I'm no steam expert but I was told while visiting a steam locomotive shop that the area around the smoke box can be in excess of 650įF, and the fire box can be over 2,700Kį under way.
That bike is hanging on the outside of what is likely the actual smoke box for that engine, I would think that even though air flow when moving forward would cool the bike, heat conduction would certainly cook that bike thoroughly regardless of surface cooling. .

vintagebicycle 12-27-21 03:55 AM


Originally Posted by capnjonny (Post 22352537)
I"m working on a Raleigh Space Rider at the moment. Almost finished except the 3 speed S/A hub won't shift. The chain that goes into the axle doesn't move at all. Short of disassembling the hub is there any way recommended to free up the shifting chain.
I thought I might flood the hub with penetrating oil then flush with alcohol or acetone and refill with oil.
Will this work or make matters worse?

If something is rusted bad enough to be stuck like that I can't imagine anything short of opening it up will do it any good.
Soak it with Kroil or PB Blaster and see what happens but chances are if its rusted bad, your going to be taking that indicator out in pieces if its rusted into the axle.
If the indicator unscrews and the hub is stuck inside, you might as well just take it apart now.
They're easy to work on, once you do one, you'll likely take everyone you get apart just to be sure of what you have.

BigChief 12-27-21 08:02 AM


Originally Posted by vintagebicycle (Post 22352575)
If something is rusted bad enough to be stuck like that I can't imagine anything short of opening it up will do it any good.
Soak it with Kroil or PB Blaster and see what happens but chances are if its rusted bad, your going to be taking that indicator out in pieces if its rusted into the axle.
If the indicator unscrews and the hub is stuck inside, you might as well just take it apart now.
They're easy to work on, once you do one, you'll likely take everyone you get apart just to be sure of what you have.

I agree. I have come across SA hubs that were actually rusted inside, but they are rare. Mostly stuck hubs are full of dried up oil gunk. Freeing it up with light oil or solvents might work, but in my experience it's easier to just dismantle the hub and clean it up.

BigChief 12-27-21 08:04 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 22352034)
Big Chief !!
Glad to see you back.
I was getting worried as you hadn't posted for a while.
My grandparents house backed onto the train tracks and we would spend hours counting cars....

Thanks. I'm fine. Just computerless for a while.

cudak888 12-27-21 08:59 AM


Originally Posted by vintagebicycle (Post 22352574)
Is anyone else thinking about how hot that bike is getting hanging on the front of the boiler like that? I can just picture all the grease dripping out of the bb and hubs as it hangs there.
I'm no steam expert but I was told while visiting a steam locomotive shop that the area around the smoke box can be in excess of 650įF, and the fire box can be over 2,700Kį under way.
That bike is hanging on the outside of what is likely the actual smoke box for that engine, I would think that even though air flow when moving forward would cool the bike, heat conduction would certainly cook that bike thoroughly regardless of surface cooling. .

Firebox is nowhere near the smokebox, but 400 degrees might be around the temp of the smokebox. Top tube would probably be the hottest bit; rest of the bike would still act as a heatsink. Depends on how cold it was that day.

Mind, given the expansion of air volume at such heat, those tubes would have probably blown the tires off the bead. There might be more at play here than we know.

-Kurt

cudak888 12-27-21 09:00 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 22352381)
Shame about the bent fork. It'll take a skilled frame guy to straighten it out but it's got alloy rims as a bonus. A good project for $100 less.

Agreed. I'd be all over it at a hundy, but $425 is just a ripoff. Straighten that fork ought to be interesting, to say the least. What tubing did they use for those pencil-thin blades?

-Kurt

clubman 12-27-21 09:08 AM


Originally Posted by cudak888 (Post 22352731)
Agreed. I'd be all over it at a hundy, but $425 is just a ripoff. Straighten that fork ought to be interesting, to say the least. What tubing did they use for those pencil-thin blades?

-Kurt

I would guess hi-tensile but Alex was a superb engineer so I'll bet it's strong. In fact, I've never seen a bent fork or frame on a Moulton, the racks act like bumpers.

cudak888 12-27-21 09:09 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 22352738)
I would guess hi-tensile but Alex was a superb engineer so I'll bet it's strong. In fact, I've never seen a bent fork or frame on a Moulton, the racks act like bumpers.

Makes you wonder what caused that one to bend, given that the rack that it's missing...is the wrong one. Smacked a curb, perhaps.

Also, is it just me, or is something off with the rear dropout? Looks as if the bottom of it is not there or considerably splayed.

-Kurt

clubman 12-27-21 10:03 AM


Originally Posted by cudak888 (Post 22352739)
Makes you wonder what caused that one to bend, given that the rack that it's missing...is the wrong one. Smacked a curb, perhaps.

Also, is it just me, or is something off with the rear dropout? Looks as if the bottom of it is not there or considerably splayed.

-Kurt

They're very odd drops...this pic shows it best, there's a cutout area that could cause one to think there's damage.


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...31afdf3dc1.jpg


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