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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Salubrious 02-09-18 11:42 AM

No photos.

Unless the SW gets some sort of mod that we currently don't know about, you can count on it to slip regardless of how hot or cold it is outside. I have an SW on my 1957 BSA rod brake machine. I appreciate the wider range of gears; when in 3rd and it pops, I have to back pedal or switch to 2nd briefly to prevent it from slipping. It will do this even if not under a lot of torque. 2nd and 1st are pretty good, but its slipped in those gears too.

I suspect that if someone spent some time sorting this out, they would find that a slightly different shape of pawl combined with better materials would sort it out. That is the only reason I've retained it, other than I don't feel like rebuilding the rear wheel on that bike right now.

restlessswind 02-09-18 01:29 PM

Coaster to 3 speed conversion
 
1 Attachment(s)
I found this early 70's Raleigh LTD SC (coaster), and my wife dug it. I bought a donor 69 or 70 AMF Hercules and swapped rear wheels and took the brakes/levers. Sold the AMF as a coaster. I still needed a thru-bolt for the rear brake (AMF had a flat bar mount instead of a tube:foo:), so I bought another shabby old Sports just for it's bolt:p.

The original saddle on the LTD is a Brooks vinyl mattress style. It was split and cracked. My father in law is redoing it in leather. He's just taking his time, so I put my wife's MTB saddle on it for the meantime.

It will get it's first ride tonight or tomorrow morning :speedy:

markk900 02-09-18 02:22 PM

I am sure she will love it- my wife loves her drop bar bike but when we go out together on old 3 speeds we get all the nice smiles and gestures from folks which we both love. And that basket is perfect for some cold wine and fresh bread and cheese!

Nice job - I really like the look of that build.

some bloke 02-09-18 02:32 PM

Hi everyone, I'd like to show you a 1958 Triumph I got recently. I got it off a farmer friend who had it stashed in a shed on his property - he couldn't remember when he acquired it.

Here it is after a clean up:

https://i.imgur.com/rA33zqA.jpg


I have fitted new grips, a new reflector and a new shift cable here. I put on a new back tire as well. It's fitted with a 3 speed AG hub, dated 8/58. All the gears work, and there's the remnants of a card attached to the light which tells you what bulbs it uses. The lights still work.

https://i.imgur.com/1p6f94O.jpg

Not a lot of wear on the cog:
https://i.imgur.com/tBvCNmS.jpg

Anybody know how long it takes the rubber grips to go like this?
https://i.imgur.com/55QVrVi.jpg

Inside the rear mudguard is very clean and well preserved. Note the Triumph script on the cog:

https://i.imgur.com/wbewc77.jpg


I had to put a modern style shifter cable on because when I changed the rear tyre, I had to undo the original cable end. It untwisted the cable and it was weakened a lot. In hindsight (which is always 20/20,) I should have put a couple of drops of oil down the cable end so it let go of the cable and didn't untwist it. I will know for next time.

A little bit of rust:

https://i.imgur.com/e07KrgJ.jpg

It's missing a couple of bits - a pedal end cap, and an original style reflector, but it's incredibly complete and original for it's age. I have ridden it a few times but I suspect you'd end up with thighs like tugboats if you rode it every day. Plans are to find the missing parts and clock up a few miles on it.

BigChief 02-09-18 04:02 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20160630)
I am sure she will love it- my wife loves her drop bar bike but when we go out together on old 3 speeds we get all the nice smiles and gestures from folks which we both love. And that basket is perfect for some cold wine and fresh bread and cheese!

Nice job - I really like the look of that build.

+1 Very well done

browngw 02-09-18 04:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by some bloke (Post 20160651)
Hi everyone, I'd like to show you a 1958 Triumph I got recently. I got it off a farmer friend who had it stashed in a shed on his property - he couldn't remember when he acquired it.

Here it is after a clean up:

https://i.imgur.com/rA33zqA.jpg


I have fitted new grips, a new reflector and a new shift cable here. I put on a new back tire as well. It's fitted with a 3 speed AG hub, dated 8/58. All the gears work, and there's the remnants of a card attached to the light which tells you what bulbs it uses. The lights still work.



Not a lot of wear on the cog:


Anybody know how long it takes the rubber grips to go like this?


Inside the rear mudguard is very clean and well preserved. Note the Triumph script on the cog:

https://i.imgur.com/wbewc77.jpg


I had to put a modern style shifter cable on because when I changed the rear tyre, I had to undo the original cable end. It untwisted the cable and it was weakened a lot. In hindsight (which is always 20/20,) I should have put a couple of drops of oil down the cable end so it let go of the cable and didn't untwist it. I will know for next time.

A little bit of rust:



It's missing a couple of bits - a pedal end cap, and an original style reflector, but it's incredibly complete and original for it's age. I have ridden it a few times but I suspect you'd end up with thighs like tugboats if you rode it every day. Plans are to find the missing parts and clock up a few miles on it.


Wow! A wonderful bicycle for sure. I have spent years looking for a vintage Triumph to keep my TR7 company in the garage. Great find. Let me know if you want to sell it.

restlessswind 02-09-18 04:26 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20160630)
i am sure she will love it- my wife loves her drop bar bike but when we go out together on old 3 speeds we get all the nice smiles and gestures from folks which we both love. And that basket is perfect for some cold wine and fresh bread and cheese!

Nice job - i really like the look of that build.

thank you!:)

BigChief 02-09-18 04:27 PM


Originally Posted by some bloke (Post 20160651)
Hi everyone, I'd like to show you a 1958 Triumph I got recently. I got it off a farmer friend who had it stashed in a shed on his property - he couldn't remember when he acquired it.

Here it is after a clean up:

https://i.imgur.com/rA33zqA.jpg


I have fitted new grips, a new reflector and a new shift cable here. I put on a new back tire as well. It's fitted with a 3 speed AG hub, dated 8/58. All the gears work, and there's the remnants of a card attached to the light which tells you what bulbs it uses. The lights still work.

https://i.imgur.com/1p6f94O.jpg

Not a lot of wear on the cog:
https://i.imgur.com/tBvCNmS.jpg

Anybody know how long it takes the rubber grips to go like this?
https://i.imgur.com/55QVrVi.jpg

Inside the rear mudguard is very clean and well preserved. Note the Triumph script on the cog:

https://i.imgur.com/wbewc77.jpg


I had to put a modern style shifter cable on because when I changed the rear tyre, I had to undo the original cable end. It untwisted the cable and it was weakened a lot. In hindsight (which is always 20/20,) I should have put a couple of drops of oil down the cable end so it let go of the cable and didn't untwist it. I will know for next time.

A little bit of rust:

https://i.imgur.com/e07KrgJ.jpg

It's missing a couple of bits - a pedal end cap, and an original style reflector, but it's incredibly complete and original for it's age. I have ridden it a few times but I suspect you'd end up with thighs like tugboats if you rode it every day. Plans are to find the missing parts and clock up a few miles on it.

What a nice bike. I love the color. The finish has just the right balance of age and good preservation. Great find.

restlessswind 02-09-18 04:44 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Nice Triumph! I used to have an old Triumph Motorcycle that I poured hours of love and lots of money into. It was a 1970 Tiger 650 (Like a Bonneville, but with a single carburetor)

BigChief 02-09-18 05:11 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by restlessswind (Post 20160899)
Nice Triumph! I used to have an old Triumph Motorcycle that I poured hours of love and lots of money into. It was a 1970 Tiger 650 (Like a Bonneville, but with a single carburetor)

:love:Still got mine. I love these bikes!
Attachment 598823

tigervw78 02-09-18 06:50 PM

Well, I put the following parts on the 72 Sports I acquired last May.

Brooks B17 Narrow I found on ebay last week for $36 shipped.
Pletscher rack I found for free at the local coop. (well $50 a year for all the parts, tools and mechanical advice I could ask for.)
Flipped the bars.
New nickel chain.
Schwalbe cream tires.
Put a Rhinodillo liner in the rear wheel.

The coop guys helped me with the chain and the liner. Tools and advice are well worth the cost. Will post pics when i ht 10. I'm pretty happy with the results so far. I need a 22T cog now.

Ballenxj 02-09-18 07:18 PM


Originally Posted by restlessswind (Post 20160899)
Nice Triumph! I used to have an old Triumph Motorcycle that I poured hours of love and lots of money into. It was a 1970 Tiger 650 (Like a Bonneville, but with a single carburetor)

Haha, I used to own a 1967 Bonneville. Fun bike. My friend had a BSA Lightning around the same vintage, and we used to go blasting down roads while listening to their symphony through megaphone exhausts. Also reminds me of having to tickle the carbs in the morning for the first start of the day. Fun times. :thumb:
Oh, I also later owned a 1978 Triumph Spitfire.

clubman 02-09-18 08:31 PM

Beautiful Triumphs all round. The 3 speed is perfect, love the colour matched rear reflector/light.

The motos are all so nice, no kinks in the exhaust pipes. The lines are so much nicer than the new models.

BigChief 02-09-18 09:00 PM

The English bicycles and motorcycles shared a common feature through the 60s and 70s. They were not quick retool their factories and incorporate the latest technology into their products. They were criticized for this at the time, but this is the very reason I'm so fond of them to this day. A 1978 Raleigh Sports isn't all that different from a 1948 Raleigh Sports and I say that's a good thing. That and the fact that splayed port British twins were available for so long. Such a beautiful, classic design.

IEthatsME 02-09-18 11:29 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Does this lot make me a Triumph enthusiast? Here's mine...
(I fitted the Triumph crank to the bicycle - how could I resist?)

Ballenxj 02-09-18 11:39 PM


Originally Posted by IEthatsME (Post 20161447)
Does this lot make me a Triumph enthusiast? Here's mine...
(I fitted the Triumph crank to the bicycle - how could I resist?)

I'd have to say that collection well qualifies you. :thumb:

BigChief 02-10-18 05:43 AM

@IEthatsME You sure do qualify as a Triumph fan! Glad you found an old style crank for your bike. Raleigh started skimping and used the standard chainring on their captive brands in the 60s. That was a mistake and you corrected it. Looks great.

some bloke 02-10-18 05:57 AM

Some nice Triumphs up there ^^ Funnily enough, I learnt to drive in a 1963 Triumph Herald like this one - same colour and body style:
http://www.classiccarportraits.co.uk...e1200_6067.jpg

browngw - I'll sell it eventually but I'm in Scotland. Nice TR7.

markk900 02-10-18 06:51 AM


Originally Posted by clubman
The motos are all so nice, no kinks in the exhaust pipes. The lines are so much nicer than the new models.

They fixed that really irritating problem in the latest versions - no more kink.

gster 02-10-18 07:08 AM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20161108)
Haha, I used to own a 1967 Bonneville. Fun bike. My friend had a BSA Lightning around the same vintage, and we used to go blasting down roads while listening to their symphony through megaphone exhausts. Also reminds me of having to tickle the carbs in the morning for the first start of the day. Fun times. :thumb:
Oh, I also later owned a 1978 Triumph Spitfire.

Inappropriate tickling of the carbs will not be tolerated!

BigChief 02-10-18 07:47 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20161638)
Inappropriate tickling of the carbs will not be tolerated!

Sometimes I'll ride with others who ride modern bikes. They hop on their bikes, push the button and are ready to go. They have to wait patiently for me to go through my starting routine. First, I have to use the kick start pedal to free up the clutch. It will grind into first if I don't. Then I open the gas valve (petcock). Then I tickle the carbs to flood the float bowls. Then I wipe the gas off my hands on my pants. At this point I'm ready toturn on the ignition and use the kick to get the motor up to compression, jump up in the air and follow through. One or two times usually does it. Then I blip the throttle a bit until the idle sets in. Then...I'm ready to go.

Stadjer 02-10-18 08:38 AM


Originally Posted by IEthatsME (Post 20161447)
Does this lot make me a Triumph enthusiast? Here's mine...

I'm not a Triumph enthousiast but that's one of the best sounding cars I've ever heard. And it's very pretty in a form follows function kind of way.

Ballenxj 02-10-18 10:10 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20161638)
Inappropriate tickling of the carbs will not be tolerated!

She required a certain amount of foreplay, or she would not perform, see Big Chief's post. ;)

gster 02-10-18 11:51 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20161675)
Sometimes I'll ride with others who ride modern bikes. They hop on their bikes, push the button and are ready to go. They have to wait patiently for me to go through my starting routine. First, I have to use the kick start pedal to free up the clutch. It will grind into first if I don't. Then I open the gas valve (petcock). Then I tickle the carbs to flood the float bowls. Then I wipe the gas off my hands on my pants. At this point I'm ready toturn on the ignition and use the kick to get the motor up to compression, jump up in the air and follow through. One or two times usually does it. Then I blip the throttle a bit until the idle sets in. Then...I'm ready to go.

Q-How do tell when it's time to put oil in a British motorcycle?
A-there's no puddle of oil underneath.
Even the restored bikes at The British Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham all had drip pans under the crankcase.

dweenk 02-10-18 01:09 PM

:roflmao2:^^^


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