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TMonk 09-02-21 02:32 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212346)
This is my biggest stumbling block/objection to climbing (other than being a fat ass) - I feel like I should be moving along at a decent clip with FTP-ish efforts, so to be crawling along offends my sensibilities.

That said, I've never endured a "real" climb, and I'm sure that I would feel some sense of satisfaction upon cresting after a long effort.

Once the gradient gets into the double digits, I feel like even it's still crawling along even for the super fit.... And that just isn't fun IMO!

A low gradient climb with favorable wind (no headwind) can be enjoyable if the scenery is nice, I'll admit that much. Sunrise Hwy in San Diego is like 5% avg and often has a tailwind, and it is nice to climb from desert chaparral into a more coniferous/mountain ecology.

datlas 09-02-21 02:32 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212352)
Or maybe "climaxing," is a better word? That would explain datlas' love of climbing.




:innocent:

:thumb:

big john 09-02-21 02:44 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212346)

That said, I've never endured a "real" climb, and I'm sure that I would feel some sense of satisfaction upon cresting after a long effort.

I've done some of the climbs in the eastern Sierra Nevada. This pic is from the climb to the Ancient Bristlecone Forrest. Gains 6000 feet in about 25 miles. Tops out at 10K but there is a dirt road up to 14K. One of my friends did that part on his mtb. It's actually the White Mountains.
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...bc0e5bdc58.jpg

ls01 09-02-21 02:48 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212346)
This is my biggest stumbling block/objection to climbing (other than being a fat ass) - I feel like I should be moving along at a decent clip with FTP-ish efforts, so to be crawling along offends my sensibilities.

That said, I've never endured a "real" climb, and I'm sure that I would feel some sense of satisfaction upon cresting after a long effort.

It takes patience, which most times I lack. I want the climb over....now! If I had any decent climbs around me I would like to do them. But no such luck. The couple of vacations and work/travel that I did with my bike were awesome. I loved California, it was great. I did some awesome climbs while I was there. Kentucky is a blast. More rollers than mountains.

big john 09-02-21 02:55 PM

A different year we went up to Lake Sabrina, South lake, and North Lake, Not quite as high at 9200' but a lot more climbing/mileage. It's really very memorable and satisfying. Especially being heavier than everyone else. Here is my friend taking a pic on the way up.
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ba9c62be91.jpg

datlas 09-02-21 03:00 PM


Originally Posted by TMonk (Post 22212369)
Once the gradient gets into the double digits, I feel like even it's still crawling along even for the super fit.... And that just isn't fun IMO!

A low gradient climb with favorable wind (no headwind) can be enjoyable if the scenery is nice, I'll admit that much. Sunrise Hwy in San Diego is like 5% avg and often has a tailwind, and it is nice to climb from desert chaparral into a more coniferous/mountain ecology.

I am trying to think of some good double-digit climbs in my area. There is one that FEELS like it's 12-14% in some sections, but the Strava segment says the climb is "only" 9.1% and 1/2 mile long. I do think an ideal pitch is somewhere in the 5-8% range, but you gotta have some variety.

big john 09-02-21 03:12 PM

A couple more from eastern Sierra trips. The view climbing to Whitney Portal just as you enter the canyon. Shortish day but lots of steep.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ddf6a4bc4a.jpg
Then there's an easy day up Rock Creek.
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...976ffba06c.jpg
I'd love to go back up there if my body would cooperate.

big john 09-02-21 03:16 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22212419)
I am trying to think of some good double-digit climbs in my area. There is one that FEELS like it's 12-14% in some sections, but the Strava segment says the climb is "only" 9.1% and 1/2 mile long. I do think an ideal pitch is somewhere in the 5-8% range, but you gotta have some variety.

After Baldy Village the road gains 2000 feet in 4 miles. It's tough for me because in addition to already having over 5k in my legs, there are extended sections of 15%.

genejockey 09-02-21 03:19 PM


Originally Posted by TMonk (Post 22212369)
Once the gradient gets into the double digits, I feel like even it's still crawling along even for the super fit.... And that just isn't fun IMO!

A low gradient climb with favorable wind (no headwind) can be enjoyable if the scenery is nice, I'll admit that much. Sunrise Hwy in San Diego is like 5% avg and often has a tailwind, and it is nice to climb from desert chaparral into a more coniferous/mountain ecology.

I find tailwinds to be a bad thing on climbs, because they don't really push you much but they do rob you of a lot of cooling.

Eric F 09-02-21 03:19 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212346)
This is my biggest stumbling block/objection to climbing (other than being a fat ass) - I feel like I should be moving along at a decent clip with FTP-ish efforts, so to be crawling along offends my sensibilities.

That said, I've never endured a "real" climb, and I'm sure that I would feel some sense of satisfaction upon cresting after a long effort.

I have. The feeling of satisfaction was little reward for the amount of suffering that preceded the satisfaction. IMO, YMMV.

Trsnrtr 09-02-21 03:22 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22211726)
Having to take a few days off of the bike isn't always fun, but man is it nice to ride with fresh legs.

I had ridden myself in to a hole and the miles were compounded by heat and hay fever. I thought I was going to have to chain my bike up if I didn't change my ways. I finally took Sunday off and then rode a club ride with slow riders on Monday. Legs felt better on Tuesday. Had a forced day off yesterday for doc appointments. Got up this morning to 55-60º temps and light winds and my legs were golden. Rode with my retired racer buddies and was even dropping the skinny guys on the short punchy hills.

Taking another day off, ride 35-40 on Saturday and then heading for Door County next week and if my 70 year old legs feel fresh, it may be a 275 mile week so leaderboard watchers should plan ahead. :innocent:

Trsnrtr 09-02-21 03:27 PM


Originally Posted by LAJ (Post 22211838)
See there? You're catching my drift. I'm tempted to do the same here. We're on a tiered water plan, because they have to pay for the increased capacity for all the multi-family dwellings they're building. Permanent construction adding big ol honkin water infrastructure. Gotta have that tax base, you know.

You could pea gravel your front yard; I've seen a lot of that in Europe, especially Ireland.

Trsnrtr 09-02-21 03:35 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22212419)
I am trying to think of some good double-digit climbs in my area. There is one that FEELS like it's 12-14% in some sections, but the Strava segment says the climb is "only" 9.1% and 1/2 mile long. I do think an ideal pitch is somewhere in the 5-8% range, but you gotta have some variety.

Sträva percentages are weird. Many of our short bluff hills are double digit; I know because I've surveyed several of them. or have plans to verify the grades. Strava almost always halves the gradient, especially in segments. They aren't even close.

Eric F 09-02-21 03:35 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22212433)
The view climbing to Whitney Portal just as you enter the canyon. Shortish day but lots of steep.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ddf6a4bc4a.jpg
.

I did the Death Valley - Mt. Whitney Road Race three times. Day 1 is Stovepipe Wells to Lone Pine. You start at 0' elevation and immediately start climbing to 5000', followed by a wide open descent to Panamint Springs (where I hit my fastest-ever speed of 60mph). Then another climb and rollers to Lone Pine - 80 mi / 9000+'. Day 2 is Lone Pine to Whitney Portal via some loops through the Alabama Hills - 20mi, 5000+'. I thought Day 2 was harder. Been there. Done that. No more, thank you.

datlas 09-02-21 03:37 PM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22212469)
Sträva percentages are weird. Many of our short bluff hills are double digit; I know because I've surveyed several of them. or have plans to verify the grades. Strava almost always halves the gradient, especially in segments. They aren't even close.

I believe it. That segment feels like 15% for about 500 feet. I have to stand up in my bailout gear (34/28) to make it.

big john 09-02-21 03:56 PM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22212470)
I did the Death Valley - Mt. Whitney Road Race three times. Day 1 is Stovepipe Wells to Lone Pine. You start at 0' elevation and immediately start climbing to 5000', followed by a wide open descent to Panamint Springs (where I hit my fastest-ever speed of 60mph). Then another climb and rollers to Lone Pine - 80 mi / 9000+'. Day 2 is Lone Pine to Whitney Portal via some loops through the Alabama Hills - 20mi, 5000+'. I thought Day 2 was harder. Been there. Done that. No more, thank you.

This is from somewhere up there looking back toward Lone Pine. The Alluvial Fan, or Plain, is ridiculous. I just remember grinding for long time without feeling like I was getting closer to the mountain.If you turn around and look back you can see it. It's a relief when you finally get to the canyon.
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9c944e1ea0.jpg


The only other time I had that feeling quite that bad was in the Tejon Pass when 2 of us were riding from hwy 138 to Gorman into a strong headwind. It just didn't seem to be getting any closer for a long time.

WhyFi 09-02-21 04:13 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22212361)
You sure seem focused on "nookie" and its relatives these days. Everything okay at home? :rolleyes:

Oh, everything is a-okay - some of us are still young enough to have libidos. ;)

BillyD 09-02-21 04:13 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22212329)
Incorrect.

Sit up a little, find the right gear/rhythm, and it's the best. The best, Jerry! THE BEST!!

Pffft. Phooey.

BillyD 09-02-21 04:21 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212346)

That said, I've never endured a "real" climb, and I'm sure that I would feel some sense of exhaustion upon cresting after a long effort.

Yeah, me too.

genejockey 09-02-21 04:22 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22212488)
This is from somewhere up there looking back toward Lone Pine. The Alluvial Fan, or Plain, is ridiculous. I just remember grinding for long time without feeling like I was getting closer to the mountain.If you turn around and look back you can see it. It's a relief when you finally get to the canyon.
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9c944e1ea0.jpg


The only other time I had that feeling quite that bad was in the Tejon Pass when 2 of us were riding from hwy 138 to Gorman into a strong headwind. It just didn't seem to be getting any closer for a long time.

Back when I was doing a lot more climbing, I did West Alpine from Pescadero Road to Skyline in the Santa Cruz Mountains. It was the first (and so far ONLY) time I'd ever ridden it, I had no GPS, and the whole time I don't think I saw even one car, and maybe one or two other cyclists. It's a longish climb that just keeps going and going and going. It was a little creepy, and I was really relieved to arrive at Skyline, let me tell you!

genejockey 09-02-21 04:23 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212346)
That said, I've never endured a "real" climb, and I'm sure that I would feel some sense of nausea upon cresting after a long effort.

Ftfy

My way of telling if I pushed hard enough on the climb is whether I want to throw up at the top. If I actually throw up, that was too hard.

WhyFi 09-02-21 04:43 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22212529)
Ftfy

My way of telling if I pushed hard enough on the climb is whether I want to throw up at the top. If I actually throw up, that was too hard.

​​​​​​So pretty much the same as yesterday at the Fair, when my kid wanted me to ride the Tilt-a-Whirl with him, and get it really spinning. :D

genejockey 09-02-21 04:50 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22212547)
​​​​​​So pretty much the same as yesterday at the Fair, when my kid wanted me to ride the Tilt-a-Whirl with him, and get it really spinning. :D

Yes, but I usually don't eat a couple corn dogs and a funnel cake before a climb.

gnome 09-02-21 05:16 PM

What's this climbing you speak of? I'm sure I'm allergic to that.

MoAlpha 09-02-21 05:43 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22212472)
I believe it. That segment feels like 15% for about 500 feet. I have to stand up in my bailout gear (34/28) to make it.

Rode the commuting bike for 30 mi over some of my workout roads today, with a backpack and all. It has a compact front and a 11-28. I really liked the way the 28 felt on the steepest section. I had previously thought it was too low, but I want one for the plastic bike now.


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