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t2p 07-11-22 07:16 AM


Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets (Post 22570589)
I should've jumped on this full squish. These bikes are super fast. I guess I'll have to keep living with my heavier, more metal full squish for now though

https://m.facebook.com/groups/183937...6852838122188/

many of the current full susp bikes I've seen are tanks ... heavy ... really heavy

t2p 07-11-22 07:21 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22570472)
Oh, you'll like it. I recommend avoiding elastomer forks and go with an air sprung or even a coil sprung fork. I had an elastomer fork one time and I put a coil spring kit in it. So much better. Came with a damper, too.
Of course an air fork will need a pump to set the pressure. The ones I've used don't seem to leak, though.

An elastomer fork will be better than a rigid fork, despite my prejudice against them.

agree

but unless / until the elastomers turn to goo and then harden into a solid mass

I'm living that dream now - have an old / early Manitou forks that need some TLC

prefer to replace it with the original rigid fork - but unfortunately so far have not been able to track down the original rigid fork

seedsbelize2 07-11-22 07:23 AM

I woke up at 5:30, drank half a cup of coffee and went back to sleep until 7:30. Still trying to wake up.

t2p 07-11-22 07:28 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22570703)
I woke up at 5:30, drank half a cup of coffee and went back to sleep until 7:30. Still trying to wake up.

your coffee needs a coffee

seedsbelize2 07-11-22 07:52 AM


Originally Posted by t2p (Post 22570707)
your coffee needs a coffee

I'm using up the various coffees around the house. Some not very good espresso, some light roast from a snowbird going back North, some Italian roast, Columbian. Mixing it all in the same cannisters. When that is gone I'll settle into something I actually like. There's always instant too. And I actually like that.

genejockey 07-11-22 08:14 AM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22570654)
As Trsnrtr sez, tubeless ain't for everything. That said, 5mm is borderline for a good sealant by itself. These look to be close to that - with some plugs, you probably would have made it home without the call of shame. Supposedly, Silca's new sealant takes this up a notch or three, as well.

The smaller one is 5mm. The larger one is more like 7 or 8.

big john 07-11-22 08:26 AM


Originally Posted by t2p (Post 22570696)
many of the current full susp bikes I've seen are tanks ... heavy ... really heavy

Depends on what you want, long travel or short, and money. You can get XC bikes under 25 pounds, some even under 23, if you want to pay. Longer travel trail bikes tend to be 28+ and enduro types are usually over 30. Mine is 32 pounds but could be made lighter with an infusion of cash.

ls01 07-11-22 09:02 AM


Originally Posted by t2p (Post 22569878)
yikes

I think I've gone through more than 3 water bottles before 50 mile mark

but then again one century drank so much water had to keep making pit stops - including one time behind a barn at a large farm lol

just one granola bar could be an issue also ?


Don't think food was an issue, I didn't feel that hungry. But I definitely need a better water plan next year...or better self control.

ls01 07-11-22 09:04 AM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22569888)
Not to shabby.

My buddy's all did 4:4ish. The guy that won the 100 did under 4 hours.

ls01 07-11-22 09:11 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22570125)
I was feeling less than stellar on the bike, possibly still a little under the weather from the double vax, though my HR seemed pretty much what I'd expect. So I decided on a leisurely ride, to cap off what I had decided would be a recovery week. So, there I was, at about mile 31, just starting down a short drop that leads to a 180 degree sweeper, when suddenly *PFFFFff!!* and my back tire is instantly flat. I stop, and start spinning the wheel to look for the little piece of glass I expect to find, so I can pop it out, replace the tube and be on my way, when I saw this...

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ac07bcfad4.jpg

No way I was gonna ride that 25 miles home, not even with a boot. So, I made the Call Of Shame. This time, Mrs. GJ had figured out how to use "Find Phone" and Siri to navigate, rather than having to remember or write down my simple directions.

As it turns out, I JUST bought a new one of those (GP5K in 25mm), because I hate not having a spare tire, in case - well, in case THIS happens.

So, an abrupt end to what had been a nice, relaxing ride. I guess Rango will get a walk today, which he usually doesn't on Sundays. Lucky bastard.

EDIT: Because the tire DEflated so completely all at once, I didn't travel far after. So I was able to walk back along my path and find what I think was the culprit. A piece of glass, with a curve that roughly matches the deeper cut about 1.5 cm long by 4 mm wide. I should have taken a picture, but I did toss it over the guard rail and into the grass.


get a couple of the Park tire boots. You'd still be riding that tire. I have one on the front wheel of the 09 Tarmac. Same situation. Brand new tire. Hit a shard of glass that put a sizable slice in the casing of the tire tread. Still works just fine. I will eventually move it to a rear for safety.

LesterOfPuppets 07-11-22 09:15 AM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22570660)
Finally back home after two long days of driving; 600 - 700 mile days, family on-board, can be grueling, even more so when dealing with rain a significant portion of each day. It's funny - it was supposed to rain almost every day that we were in VA, but it never did until we packed up and left. I guess that we should be thankful for that.

Oh, the longer of the two days brought us within ~25 miles of the Buc-ee's outside of Lexintington, KY, but I wasn't about to add another hour of driving just to make a gits-and-shiggles detour.

I drove 140ish miles to beat the heat. I'd intended to do an epic ride or hike today but I walked around town so much yesterday (in crappy shoes) that my Achilles(es) are not feeling it at all. So just gonna chill. About to stroll over to get crepes and coffee, but gonna wear the nice hiking shoes.

LesterOfPuppets 07-11-22 09:22 AM

Might have to drop by the brewery and do some trainspotting a little later. Had two pints there yesterday afternoon and watched a dozen trains go by, probably 80 locos or so but they were all BNSF pumpkins. I was reduced to noting whether they were black letter pumpkins, yellow letter pumpkins or wedge logo pumpkins :)

I can also partake in trainspotting from my hotel bed, first train by upon opening the curtains this morning had a spicier lash-up in front: a pumpkin, a big black Norfolk Southern, and a War Bonnet.

genejockey 07-11-22 09:45 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22570755)
The smaller one is 5mm. The larger one is more like 7 or 8.

Actually, I realize I was thinking of the holes in the tube. In the tire, the cuts are more like 7mm and 1 cm on the inside of the casing. Others may feel differently, but I would NOT trust a boot to hold that tire together, even to get home. It's 23 miles and several 6% descents.

genejockey 07-11-22 10:00 AM

As I think about it, if I had been in an area with no or poor cell reception, I might have booted the tire and nursed it along to someplace with cell reception and a convenient pickup point. In this case, there's a nice shady spot about 200 yards from a major freeway offramp, so it was easy for Mrs. GeneJockey to find me. And if I had booted the tire and then that failed somewhere between there and home, it might not have been as convenient a spot for pickup. Or it might be in a spot with no cell!

Eric F 07-11-22 10:18 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22570766)
Depends on what you want, long travel or short, and money. You can get XC bikes under 25 pounds, some even under 23, if you want to pay. Longer travel trail bikes tend to be 28+ and enduro types are usually over 30. Mine is 32 pounds but could be made lighter with an infusion of cash.

Same as it's always been...the battle against gravity is expensive.

big john 07-11-22 10:24 AM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22570925)
Same as it's always been...the battle against gravity is expensive.

Your new hardtail must be pretty light? I don't remember if you mentioned that. Carbon wheels?

Mojo31 07-11-22 10:58 AM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22570925)
Same as it's always been...the battle against gravity is expensive.

And fraught with peril.

Eric F 07-11-22 11:13 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22570944)
Your new hardtail must be pretty light? I don't remember if you mentioned that. Carbon wheels?

It's light - 21.0lbs. That includes the dropper post I added, so it could easily be lighter. It has Stan's Podium SRD carbon wheels, which are bumping up against "stupid light" (1300g), and I'm pretty much at the manufacturer's recommended weight limit for them. I need to change the crankset (different length), and found a reasonable deal on a set of XX1s that will drop about 100g (1/4lb). Although losing weight off my fat ass would be a cheaper option (working on it...kinda), a light bike is always fun.

EDIT: There's a guy on the MTBR forum who has a detailed thread about his lightweight build of a Specialized S-Works full-squish bike. It weighs about 1/2 a pound less than my hardtail, but he's into it for a LOT more money than I am.

seedsbelize2 07-11-22 11:21 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22570766)
Depends on what you want, long travel or short, and money. You can get XC bikes under 25 pounds, some even under 23, if you want to pay. Longer travel trail bikes tend to be 28+ and enduro types are usually over 30. Mine is 32 pounds but could be made lighter with an infusion of cash.

I just want something to smooth out the ride some. A run of the mill fork will do that. I put a well used cheap suspension fork on my hybrid bike, in Belize and it made a huge difference.

big john 07-11-22 11:30 AM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22571037)
It's light - 21.0lbs. That includes the dropper post I added, so it could easily be lighter. It has Stan's Podium SRD carbon wheels, which are bumping up against "stupid light" (1300g), and I'm pretty much at the manufacturer's recommended weight limit for them. I need to change the crankset (different length), and found a reasonable deal on a set of XX1s that will drop about 100g (1/4lb). Although losing weight off my fat ass would be a cheaper option (working on it...kinda), a light bike is always fun.

EDIT: There's a guy on the MTBR forum who has a detailed thread about his lightweight build of a Specialized S-Works full-squish bike. It weighs about 1/2 a pound less than my hardtail, but he's into it for a LOT more money than I am.

One of my road bikes is heavier than that, (21 pounds). The wheels are around 2000 grams.

datlas 07-11-22 11:36 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22570891)
As I think about it, if I had been in an area with no or poor cell reception, I might have booted the tire and nursed it along to someplace with cell reception and a convenient pickup point. In this case, there's a nice shady spot about 200 yards from a major freeway offramp, so it was easy for Mrs. GeneJockey to find me. And if I had booted the tire and then that failed somewhere between there and home, it might not have been as convenient a spot for pickup. Or it might be in a spot with no cell!

Yeah, after looking at the pics, I think that I would have booted this and ridden home at 8MPH. But that's me.

Eric F 07-11-22 11:38 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22571057)
One of my road bikes is heavier than that, (21 pounds). The wheels are around 2000 grams.

The Enve 3.4s on my 16lb road bike are heavier than the wheels on my hardtail MTB. Like I said...stupid light. I doubt I would have ever bought these wheels separately, but they were on the bike, so I'm sticking with them.

WhyFi 07-11-22 11:39 AM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22571065)
Yeah, after looking at the pics, I think that I would have booted this and ridden home at 8MPH. But that's me.

I live on the wild side, I would have ridden home at 12 mph.

genejockey 07-11-22 11:42 AM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22571065)
Yeah, after looking at the pics, I think that I would have booted this and ridden home at 8MPH. But that's me.


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22571077)
I live on the wild side, I would have ridden home at 12 mph.

Apart from HTFU points, why?

big john 07-11-22 11:44 AM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22571074)
The Enve 3.4s on my 16lb road bike are heavier than the wheels on my hardtail MTB. Like I said...stupid light. I doubt I would have ever bought these wheels separately, but they were on the bike, so I'm sticking with them.

2 of the women I ride mtb with have bought light carbon wheels and both are very happy with the feel of the wheels. One is a lightweight climber and the other is a descending monster.
I hear a lot of the cf wheels come with a lifetime warranty now.


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