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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

Road Fan 06-30-09 08:51 AM


Originally Posted by sekaijin (Post 9193686)
Hi I know there is another tubulars thread running currently, but Im posting here to avoid further hijacking that thread.

A friend was kind enough to give me some NOS tubulars he has no use for some Vittoria Swallow Montello and a Vittoria Competition Formula Uno.

I have not found much of anything about them in a quick BF and web search (other than one BF member who had a bad experience with a Formula Uno tire).

Can anyone comment on these tires, from personal experience? Which are better tires, the Swallow Montello or the Competition Formula Uno? Any sense of where they fit in a Vittoria hierarchy?

Please, Im looking for feedback only on these particular tires, since I have some in hand. Thanks! :)

Can't say I've heard of them, certainly not on Vittoria's current site. Are they marked "Made in Italy"? They could date back to those days. Maybe an inquiry on Classic Rendezvous? I know some of us here (me included) are on CR, but for me, I don't have more of a clue for you.

sekaijin 06-30-09 01:53 PM


Originally Posted by Road Fan (Post 9193727)
Are they marked "Made in Italy"?

Good thought.

Vittoria Competition Formula Uno: made in Thailand.

Vittoria Swallow Montello: no markings found except "HS 021" and "8605."

Only a guess, but my hunch is they are low-end to mid-range tires for my commuter. They have the classic gum walls and black herringbone treads. My impression is, higher-end tires often have smooth/slick treads, sometimes in colors.

J T CUNNINGHAM 06-30-09 11:36 PM

"Doesn't the freezing point of water at 0 make more sense than 32 and the boiling point at 100 make more sense than 212?" QUOTE.


Not really! ....... (LOL)


Regards,
J T

Ronsonic 07-01-09 12:43 AM

But "0" being way cold and "100" being too danged hot does make perfect sense.

soderbiker 07-01-09 01:59 PM


Originally Posted by Scooper (Post 1831779)
Ummm. Too many flats, too long for the glue to dry, too messy.

Solution: Clinchers and a patch kit.

Been there, done that.

not messy . never had a flat with tubulars and i havent had a mess

solution = Tufo Giro twix tubulars -
:)

sekaijin 07-01-09 11:16 PM


Originally Posted by sekaijin (Post 9193686)
A friend was kind enough to give me some NOS tubulars he has no use for some Vittoria Swallow Montello and a Vittoria Competition Formula Uno.

Vittoria Competition Formula Uno: made in Thailand.

Vittoria Swallow Montello: no markings found except "HS 021" and "8605."

Correction - the Swallow Montello tires are not Vittoria, just plain Swallow Montello.

sekaijin 07-02-09 06:23 AM

^^ Interesting tidbit of web research: Swallow was a brand name of a Korean bicycle tire manufacturer that became a supplier to a German bicycle tire exporter in 1973 ...

... and the origin of the Schwalbe brand name.

They must have kept the Swallow name in use for US distribution, because these tires are too new-looking to date from the early 70s. Unless the rubber and glue can stay supple for that long.

garage sale GT 11-01-09 09:25 PM

Have any of you guys ever tried using the 32mm, gray, diamond tread, cyclocross Vittorias on the street? I am wondering how they'd stick and if the compound would last.

I am fascinated by the higher volume tubulars but would like to avoid spending $150(!). I figure I'd run them at 75 psi or so.

Road Fan 04-02-10 04:20 PM


Originally Posted by garage sale GT (Post 9965784)
Have any of you guys ever tried using the 32mm, gray, diamond tread, cyclocross Vittorias on the street? I am wondering how they'd stick and if the compound would last.

I am fascinated by the higher volume tubulars but would like to avoid spending $150(!). I figure I'd run them at 75 psi or so.

I tried those this winter. I didn't get on any snow, but just in pavement riding, they are not a fast-feeling tire. At 85 psi (the marked upper limit) they are harsh, and at 60 they are totally sluggish, but soft. At 75 they were quicker and not quite so harsh, but still a bit tiring compared to my 28 mm Gatorskin clinchers. Plus, they have latex tubes, requiring a lot of attention to tire pressure.

gaucho777 04-02-10 11:03 PM

As for removing glue from rims, etc., I find Brasso (household metal polish available in many drugstores) works exceptionally well. Just apply to a rag and rub the glue off. Wipe away residue with a clean rag.

shnibop 07-14-10 08:10 PM

read through several pages and am having trouble finding any actual recommendations for specific tires, soooo...

can anyone recommend a gum-wall tubular that would look/be appropriate for a 1982 cinelli super corsa?

this would be my first set of tubulars, the bike would not be ridden frequently, maybe 50 miles a month.

my 1st choice would be something that is ERA correct, rather than a newly released tire, but will do "new" if it makes safety/cost sense. looking to spend in the $100 range (possible?).

USAZorro 07-14-10 08:55 PM

$100.00 per tire, or for a pair?

shnibop 07-14-10 09:05 PM

pair sorry

USAZorro 07-14-10 10:17 PM

Continental Giros are pretty good tires. The "house" tires from Yellow Jersey are pretty good too. Have heard good things about Gommitalias also from several people, and gotten a mixed report from one person.

jebejava 07-15-10 12:27 AM

I've been using Vittoria Rally in the 700Cx23 size, gum wall, $25 each at Universal. They've served me very well and the extra width gives a nicer ride.

I've tried some Clement of recent manufacture and they were narrow and harsh riding. I think I was unlucky, but the front Clement flatted in less than a mile on the first ride! I've also used cheap Gommitalia Basics, bought at some swap meet. They too were wider and lasted a long time. However, I just couldn't find them again, only higher priced Gommis.

USAZorro 07-15-10 06:27 AM


Originally Posted by jebejava (Post 11115340)
I've been using Vittoria Rally in the 700Cx23 size, gum wall, $25 each at Universal. They've served me very well and the extra width gives a nicer ride.

I've tried some Clement of recent manufacture and they were narrow and harsh riding. I think I was unlucky, but the front Clement flatted in less than a mile on the first ride! I've also used cheap Gommitalia Basics, bought at some swap meet. They too were wider and lasted a long time. However, I just couldn't find them again, only higher priced Gommis.

Rallys are ok, but I don't think they ride as nice as some of the others.

garage sale GT 07-15-10 10:26 AM


Originally Posted by shnibop (Post 11114331)
...a gum-wall tubular that would look/be appropriate for a 1982 cinelli super corsa?

I don't know if Cinellis came with special tires, but the Vittoria Rally has a vintage look except for the fairly large tricolor logo. They are available in gumwall and have a diamond tread. The Yellow Jersey 3-for-$50 model also looks vintage. Yellow Jersey apparently found a tire they liked and asked the maker to keep churning them out without annual improvements, so the cost would be low.

What I mean by vintage is "gumwall with diamond tread". They'll look vintage to the average cyclist.

Chombi 07-15-10 11:01 AM


Originally Posted by USAZorro (Post 11115863)
Rallys are ok, but I don't think they ride as nice as some of the others.

Rallies are definitely down market comapared to many other tubulars, but at least it still gives a much better ride than any clincher setup I've ridden on. You do get what you pay for in the form of base tapes that are sometimes not as straight on the tube as most of us will like, and issues that usually arise with the tire base tape resisting to bed down completely against the rim at the valve area because of lumpy/thick base tape installation by the manufacturer, which I found to be typical with Vittoria's Rally tubes.

Chombi

ScottRyder 07-15-10 11:13 AM

I've been riding with Rallys until I experienced the difference with Dugasts that came on my newly acquired Paramount. They are truly lovely but wow, expensive.

Scott

Legnano47 07-15-10 11:21 AM

One tip I learned is to tape up the braking surface (all the way to where the tubular meets the rim) with masking tape prior to applying glue. This way you can get a little messy and when all done, just peel off the tape and you're good to go.

Maddox 07-15-10 11:26 AM


Originally Posted by Chombi (Post 11117471)
Rallies are definitely down market comapared to many other tubulars, but at least it still gives a much better ride than any clincher setup I've ridden on. You do get what you pay for in the form of base tapes that are sometimes not as straight on the tube as most of us we'll like, and issues that usually arise with the tire resisting to bed down completely against the rim at the valve area because of lumpy/thick base tape installation by the manufacturer, which I found to be typical with Vittoria's Rally tubes.

Chombi

+1. I recently had my first experience with buying and riding sew ups, and I ended going with the Rally. While it may be "downmarket", it's certainly worked perfectly for me and I find them to be exceptionally smooth and tight in the handling department. No problems mounting, no problems with riding, no flats, no issues whatsoever. To me, they were a great purchase and I would have no problem recommending them to someone else.

SJX426 07-15-10 11:43 AM


Originally Posted by Legnano47 (Post 11117609)
One tip I learned is to tape up the braking surface (all the way to where the tubular meets the rim) with masking tape prior to applying glue. This way you can get a little messy and when all done, just peel off the tape and you're good to go.

Like this idea!

I have had at least 3 flats in the last 500 miles, all on the Ralley. Can't complain about the price too much but the run rate is not good. Thought about repairing but at the price, maybe not worth it. My last one was yesterday on the front. I was riding with a couple of other people and didn't see what I ran over. That one lasted 520 miles.

I would consider more expensive tires, but I can't justify the cost at this rate of flats unles someone can tell me it is different.

Given the lack of respect for tubulars, I have started to monitor tubular availability at a LBS that gets NOS ones once in a while. He ends up selling them to me at nearly 50% off cause he doesn't get demand for them and they are ususally part of a package purchase he makes.

sced 07-15-10 11:50 AM


Originally Posted by Legnano47 (Post 11117609)
One tip I learned is to tape up the braking surface (all the way to where the tubular meets the rim) with masking tape prior to applying glue. This way you can get a little messy and when all done, just peel off the tape and you're good to go.

Unnecessary because a little mineral spirits (paint thinner) on a rag cleans the glue up pronto.

Legnano47 07-15-10 01:03 PM

Again , These are just tips. There are different methods.
BUT, Mineral Spirits are not allowed in the house or near our hardwood floors. Also, I don't want it accidently wicking into the tire casing. Don't know what it would do to the glue or tube. Don't want to find out either.
I can glue up a tire while watching the Tour all from the comfort of my sofa.

gt95 07-15-10 03:41 PM


Originally Posted by USAZorro (Post 11114976)
Continental Giros are pretty good tires. The "house" tires from Yellow Jersey are pretty good too. Have heard good things about Gommitalias also from several people, and gotten a mixed report from one person.

+1 on Conti Giros. Maybe its me, but for some reason the Giros don't seem to get much discussion on the board, the Rally seems to have captured more attention. The base tape on the Giros I've had to date is more securely glued to the carcass. Seems like I'm constantly re-gluing the base tape on the Rallys.

I realize they are both cheap tires, but I have an easier time getting a good install with the Giros - they seem to be straighter than the Rally, and I get a better seating on the GP4 with the slightly narrower construction.

noglider 07-15-10 04:02 PM

When I rode tubulars, I sewed them up with dental floss. It's very cheap and very strong.

sykerocker 07-15-10 04:26 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 11119444)
When I rode tubulars, I sewed them up with dental floss. It's very cheap and very strong.

I still do - it works too well to not use. And, another very happy vote for Rallyes. Five years running and they haven't let me down yet.

Chombi 07-15-10 04:41 PM

Don't really know if I mentioned it earlier in this long thread but I'd like to throw a vote in for Schwalbe Milanos. discovered them after I've been riding Vittoria Rallies. A bit more expensive but it's a higher quality tire than the Rallies. Base tapes are nice and straight with no lumpiness as some Rallies have. They are also much lighter. the ride is a bit more comfortable as the tire seems to be more complaint overall with thinner feeling tread and sidewall material. I haven't rode them that much yet, but I suspect that they will be less flat reisitant than the Rallies, but the ride quality is a definite step up. It pretty much is in the lower mid-price portion of the tubular market at around 40-45 bucks a pop.

Chombi

Oldpeddaller 07-16-10 12:08 PM


Originally Posted by peripatetic (Post 1883914)
I know, geez, grump. What's up, Debbie Downer? Seems like r.o.t. should be in the roadies forum, not here in Classic & Vintage where nostalgia is kind of the point.

BTW what the hell's wrong with a little nostalgia, anyway? Heck, why ride a bike when you can just hop in a Hummer laden with goodies like on-board GPS and DVD players? You're logic amounts to general kill-joy joy.

Too tired to discuss the engineering, but not too tired to generally dampen someone else's mood.

* * *

My roommate, a cyclocrosser, just got through telling me that tubulars are far better for cyclocross racing; he said that he's lost a whole season to a couple of pinch flats on his old clinchers.

Nah, Nostalgia's not what it used to be!

Tubulars are awesome - always have been always will - and that's my totally subjective view! Tub 'socks' really were socks back in the day. We'd hang a bare tub on a toestrap under the saddle, but in the summer the glue would pick up dust and in the winter the whole lot would get wet and covered in mud. Socks go in the washing in pairs and end up as singles in the drawer three days later - it's an immutable law of nature. So, you leave the lonely sock there in the optimistic hope that it's partner will magically appear some day. Never does - that's another law of nature. They must have a bad homing instinct and a strong migration urge. So, instead of binning them all, we'd pick a nice looking long one, pop the glued & folded tub inside with a few other bits, twist and knot the top and strap this cool looking sausage under the saddle. Then go riding, British Clubman style, hopeful that we'd never need to untie that sock. I only punctured a tub once - an a day I'd left my spare behind after cleaning the bike. Luckily a passing rider was carrying a full sock and took pity on me. Nostalgia in spades!

gaucho777 08-06-10 11:14 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Anyone have any advice for repairing/filling a small but deep gash like this?:

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=163646


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