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-   -   How simply do you live? (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=163801)

af895 01-08-06 10:54 PM


Originally Posted by cabana 4 life
ive lived in a small camper for 2 years now. i have some stuff in a storage unit ,but im going to give it away because i havent missed it. im looking into buying a houseboat to live on i think it would be great. the biggest thing i have is two bikes and a padicab, (and im thinking about getting another one this year). i used to be driver for ups. i thought i had to have a huge house and a nice car, home theater all that crap. then one day i quite, i hated that job so much. im so much happier now. f*#k keeping up with the jones. .. they can keep there debt.

WAY TO GO CABANA 4 LIFE! :D

I dream of dropping out and becoming a wandering poet. I still have a student loan to pay off before I can do this (it's with family so while I can't skip on it, I have flexible terms).
Houseboat is a definite dream of mine - I'd love to live in a Great Lakes tugboat or a river barge as they're huge but then, there's money to maintain them I think. (I know little about boats coming from an aviation background)

May I ask, do you live in a warm part of the world?
I can't see living "off the grid" in the arctic - too harsh - but in a warm climate, a houseboat or camper would be workable.

EDIT: I'll echo vrkellys best wishes. Anyone who's checked out of the rat-race has my utmost respect and admiration.

madnomad 01-08-06 10:59 PM


Originally Posted by vrkelley
Yes we have several members who post on Bike Forums who are homeless by choice, H. Katrina or for other reasons. I wish you the very best in the coming year :)


-vr


Thank you vrkelly, I wish you the same :)

TuckertonRR 01-09-06 07:52 AM


Originally Posted by davidmcowan
I shed most of my belongings when I was moved to Costa Rica. Now that I am back in the states my idea of minimalism is much more minimal. :) You should really take a look at this site (www.simpleliving.net) go in the forums section that have advice and encouragement (much like here) around all of the different angles of simple living. This site and there are the two that keep me truckin' in a low paying job and living a "rich" lifestyle.

Call me a sceptic, but.....
"simple living" huh? anti-consumerist my a$$....all that seems to be done on this site is sell books.
remember folks, you can't "live simply" by taking out these books at the library, you gotta buy them!

shokhead 01-09-06 08:57 AM

I like having stuff.

af895 01-09-06 09:11 AM


Originally Posted by TuckertonRR
Call me a sceptic, but.....
"simple living" huh? anti-consumerist my a$$....all that seems to be done on this site is sell books.
remember folks, you can't "live simply" by taking out these books at the library, you gotta buy them!

Or you could go to your local Chapters/Indigo, find said book and read it there without buying it.

eofelis 01-09-06 10:00 AM


Originally Posted by smithers
i agree with dahon steve-stay out of the credit card trap! i had myself in quite a $$$ mess when i had credit card debt and it SUCKS!

I have avoided CC debt like the plague too!

When I was young, just out of high school, I got my first CC from a local bank. The credit limit was $500. I had that card for about 10 yrs. It worked out great, I couldn't rack up any more than the limit. I think I carried a balance on it once or twice, mostly I paid it off every month. I knew that if I wanted to spend more than $500, I may as well pay in cash.

Now I have 2 CC. I usually don't carry them around with me. Only if I am travelling (for emergencies) of if I know I am going to specifically buy something with them. One is a REI Visa. I get cash back towards my REI dividend. REI is one of the few places I like to shop. This CC is from a large bank that has a local branch that I can make the payments on the card at (they have not had any problem with me bringing my bike in, right up to the teller window). I got a late fee once b/c the PO was slow getting my payment to them by mail, so now I pay in person.

I have not had car payments for 10 yrs. My 15yo Subaru still looks and runs well.

My BF got his first CC at 38yrs old. He still has the first vehicle he bought for cash in 1986, but it's not running too well anymore. He rides his bike mostly anyway.

I don't know what my "credit score" is. Nor do I care. I can't think of anything I want bad enough to go into debt for it.

I'm a full-time (non-trad) undergrad student, and I am "poor" enough to get Pell grants and scholarships to pay for all my tuition and most of my living expenses. Life is good. School is fun!

cerewa 01-09-06 10:45 AM


I was wrapping my self worth in the items I owed. Funny I thought I owed them, but they actually owned me.
(but then...)

I started to donate my items slowly at first and have been cleaning the house ever since.
I guess you pwned those items. :)

cerewa 01-09-06 11:12 AM

Myself I like some posessions. I'm going to buy a used computer and get rid of two crappy computers I have. I usually don't give away clothes- I just keep them and use them till they're worn out. I don't buy many clothes. I don't buy many kitchen implements either, but my partner buys lots and then they sort of belong to her and me. I consider having a toaster oven and microwave to be worth it since they save some electricity. I own four bikes but I'm getting rid of one. That'll leave me with two that have mostly interchangeable parts (i'll be ready if something breaks) and one folding bike. I also have two computers that don't really work right, but have some parts that are still good so I need to take the trouble to give them away on craigslist or somesuch.


I can't see living "off the grid" in the arctic - too harsh - but in a warm climate, a houseboat or camper would be workable.
I know the guy who used to be (and still is, probably) head of the Alaska Green party. He lives in a fairly big 2 story house with walls of big bales of straw stuccoed over, and heated/powered by solar and wind. I think the walls are 6 feet thick. The house can't have been cheap, but he has no home energy bills. That's one way to be off the grid.

Portis 01-09-06 11:22 AM

Ten years ago when i moved out of my parents' house, I had a rusty old car and little else. I had no possessions to speak of. I didn't even have a TV. I just had a few clothes and that was it. Since then I have gotten married, had kids and bought a house. It would easily take two semi trailers to move me now. And I'm not kidding either!

We have a good sized home with lots of storage areas, which are mostly full. We have tons of stuff. Too much? (is 6 TV's too much?) Probably but what do i care. I have a great family and if it makes them happy it makes me happy. Personally I don't require much.

kurremkarm 01-09-06 01:18 PM

I enjoyed reading this thread and enjoy this forum because it is supportive of my own habits and makes me feel like i am not alone in them. First of all, being car free where i live is not socially acceptable. Here if you don't own a car you are lazy or poor trash or a druggie or an alcoholic. That may seem harsh but the very best i can hope for is to be considered eccentric and not crazy. :P

Also, I might be just a little crazy. I saw Steve dahon talking about buying things to counter depression. My problem is anxiety and i try to control my life. I think there are many people living anxious lives in the middle of the cities in America who are cut off from society to varying degrees. As i said, my choices are not the norm and society frowns on that. My car free lifestyle, my low stress job working as a night janitor, all my choices are really about controlling my life.

Another poster asked what philosphers we got our inspiration from and i hate to agree with Bush but put me down for Jesus Christ. Actually since i became a christian i let some of the control go out of my life and turned to God for certain things, sorta letting go and letting God, etc, etc.

I also liked that quote from lost in translation, the more you know about urself and who u are the less you let things bother u, true. I think it's important to try to be a good person and do what you think is right and to live and let live. I love my bicycle for it's simplicity and economy and the beauty of its function.

Ramble on.

buzzman 01-09-06 01:37 PM

This is one of the best threads I have read on this forum. I read every one of the posts and found them inspiring.


so far bike forums has been great for me in that I was finally convinced to get studded snow tires for my commuter and they've made all the difference in the world.

Now I am packing up one of the old tv sets (it works great) that was given to me years ago (now that it has been replaced by a newer tv that was given to me) and giving it away. see you later.

jamesdenver 01-09-06 01:43 PM


Originally Posted by kurremkarm

Another poster asked what philosphers we got our inspiration from and i hate to agree with Bush but put me down for Jesus Christ. Actually since i became a christian i let some of the control go out of my life and turned to God for certain things, sorta letting go and letting God, etc, etc.

I also liked that quote from lost in translation, the more you know about urself and who u are the less you let things bother u, true. I think it's important to try to be a good person and do what you think is right and to live and let live. I love my bicycle for it's simplicity and economy and the beauty of its function.

Ramble on.


Thanks -- i heard him say that and thought "hey, that's a great philosphy for life"

As are the Beatitudes, regardless of religion

jamesdenver 01-09-06 02:00 PM


Originally Posted by eofelis
I have avoided CC debt like the plague too!

When I was young, just out of high school, I got my first CC from a local bank. The credit limit was $500. I had that card for about 10 yrs. It worked out great, I couldn't rack up any more than the limit. I think I carried a balance on it once or twice, mostly I paid it off every month. I knew that if I wanted to spend more than $500, I may as well pay in cash.

Now I have 2 CC. I usually don't carry them around with me. Only if I am travelling (for emergencies) of if I know I am going to specifically buy something with them. One is a REI Visa. I get cash back towards my REI dividend. REI is one of the few places I like to shop. This CC is from a large bank that has a local branch that I can make the payments on the card at (they have not had any problem with me bringing my bike in, right up to the teller window). I got a late fee once b/c the PO was slow getting my payment to them by mail, so now I pay in person.

I have not had car payments for 10 yrs. My 15yo Subaru still looks and runs well.

My BF got his first CC at 38yrs old. He still has the first vehicle he bought for cash in 1986, but it's not running too well anymore. He rides his bike mostly anyway.

I don't know what my "credit score" is. Nor do I care. I can't think of anything I want bad enough to go into debt for it.

I'm a full-time (non-trad) undergrad student, and I am "poor" enough to get Pell grants and scholarships to pay for all my tuition and most of my living expenses. Life is good. School is fun!

I think credit cards are great: for air miles, bonuses, airlines tickets (safety if out of biz), and buying things on e-bay, or internet purchase.

they provide MUCH more safety and protection than a debit card. but as mentioned above they require delicate delicate handling to balance (no pun intended), the few good things about credit cards versus the bad. kind of like carrying a grenade around for protection, for an unskilled person there's more risk of it blowing up in your face.

i do get my credit reports (not score) every six months, i think it's good to know what's "on file" about you. there's usually always a few innaccurate things.

also speaking of "off the grid", something i've done for the past seven years is own a mailbox at mail boxes etc. it's a $150 a year, but keeps my address stable no matter where i live, and they accept packages for me (i get lots of stuff online). i've moved two times, bought a house, and i keep my mail going there.

it's not for any militant paranoid reason, but just a little buffer between where i live and the outside world. i don't want people and companies to easily find where i live. (actually MBE makes you show proof of location, but i've moved since then).

this book is a fun read, "how to be invisible", which takes it to the extreme - -but for practical everyday things like women protecting their privacy from creepy guys at work (or vice versa), some of the stuff makes a lot of sense. or think of what happened with richard jewell, (falsely accused olympic bomber): should you be involved with something high profile, having the media not be able to locate your place of residence is great benefit. (and we all know how fair the media is)

and another benefit, should you just want to pick up and say move to argentina for a month, you wouldn't have to change your mail. just have them keep it, or forward it

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/031...books&v=glance

anyway now everyone probably thinks i'm nuts, but oh well :)

cabana 4 life 01-09-06 02:05 PM


Originally Posted by af895
WAY TO GO CABANA 4 LIFE! :D

I dream of dropping out and becoming a wandering poet. I still have a student loan to pay off before I can do this (it's with family so while I can't skip on it, I have flexible terms).
Houseboat is a definite dream of mine - I'd love to live in a Great Lakes tugboat or a river barge as they're huge but then, there's money to maintain them I think. (I know little about boats coming from an aviation background)

May I ask, do you live in a warm part of the world?
I can't see living "off the grid" in the arctic - too harsh - but in a warm climate, a houseboat or camper would be workable.

EDIT: I'll echo vrkellys best wishes. Anyone who's checked out of the rat-race has my utmost respect and admiration.

i live in west michigan about a mile from lake michigan. winter in the camper is ok, its got a furnace so i spend about $40 a month on lp gas. i also put it next to my parents house in the winter because most campground's wont let me stay there, plus then my mom dosent worry so much about me. it cool being around house it's amazing how meny people have wireless internet that you can borrow.

pakole 01-09-06 02:09 PM

Ummm... do they know you are burrowing it? ;)

jamesdenver 01-09-06 02:12 PM


Originally Posted by jamesdenver
I

also speaking of "off the grid", something i've done for the past seven years is own a mailbox at mail boxes etc. it's a $150 a year, but keeps my address stable no matter where i live, and they accept packages for me (i get lots of stuff online). i've moved two times, bought a house, and i keep my mail going there.

oh and from a privacy advocate point of view what could be better than being car-free?

keeping your true address from insurance companies, loan companies, and state registrations is a huge pain in the butt.

bike, bus, subways, cabs, and trains are the preferred method for the james bond subterfuge lifestyle :)

af895 01-09-06 02:27 PM

James Denver: I don't think you're odd at all. Those are great ideas for managing contact with society while keeping it from intruding.

Before paying the cards off and cutting them up, I had large amounts of AirMiles/SkyMiles, whatever each of them called their rewards points.

If I redeemed points for air travel, I still ended up paying sales tax, airport tax, fuel surcharges and any other fee they saw fit to charge. A short, 60 minute flight between here and where my grandmother lives would have cost about $100 in "fees" even with points.

If I took the TRAIN instead, I'd have a 5 hour trip BUT little or no fees if I used the accumulated reward points. I guess I'm just saying, while these reward programs can be useful, big-money (CC companies, banks, utilities, big-oil etc) will do EVERYTHING in their power to keep taking money from your pocket - such as those "fees" when you want to redeem points.

To me, frugality means being ruthless with your money when other people want it so you still have some when YOU want to spend it.

*** *** ***

Cabana 4 Life: thanks for the info! I'm feeling even more inspired knowing about your location and also hearing about the fellow in Alaska with the straw-bale house living off the grid.

jamesdenver 01-09-06 02:36 PM

[QUOTE=af895]

Before paying the cards off and cutting them up, I had large amounts of AirMiles/SkyMiles, whatever each of them called their rewards points.

If I redeemed points for air travel, I still ended up paying sales tax, airport tax, fuel surcharges and any other fee they saw fit to charge. A short, 60 minute flight between here and where my grandmother lives would have cost about $100 in "fees" even with points.

QUOTE]

very true - i've used them for int'l travel, but fees do at up.

what kind of aviation consulting do you do? (saw in earlier post). i've had my private pilot's certificate since 2000, (speaking of easy,fun ways to travel). i have my IFR hours done, but i don't fly enought to keep IFR current so didn't proceed further. but i love flying when i CAN afford it, great way to keep your mind sharp, and i'm a map geek to so love looking at approach plates, and the systems and procedures and commication of commercial and general aviation...

smilin buddha 01-09-06 03:34 PM

[QUOTE=cerewa](but then...)

I never said that the writing on my computer makes as much sense as when its in my head.



My father always called them the golden chains. Debt, Car payment, to many possesions. I just need to clear the space. I think one of the ways I failed to simplify was buying a house. I have a full house and also storage shed. It amazed me the things that I bought or got secondhand to fill this space. Of course living in the hurricane state. Last year was a great eye opener on what is important. So I need to stock up on water and food for a few days. I never ran the generator like the year before. But the guy across the street was spending 30 dollars a day on gas to run his large tv and all the items in his house. I realized I can be happy with a hot cup of coffee and a warm meal. It was nice to go to the spare room and see so much space. I plan on adding more space and less items.

eofelis 01-09-06 04:17 PM

[QUOTE=smilin buddha]

Originally Posted by cerewa
I think one of the ways I failed to simplify was buying a house.

I wonder about the house-buying thing....

I've heard the house called "the ultimate possession"

My parents never owned a house. They rented a very small house in a rural area when I was growing up. I had miles of woods and fields to roam in, and my parents didn't seem unhappy that they didn't own the house. After my dad passed away, my mom wanted to move closer to town. She gave 30 days notice and moved out (I had moved out before then). So it never really occured to me that you had to own a house.

My BF & I live in a 1 br apt over a 4 car garage. It's pretty nice, not too expensive, close to places we need to go. Sometimes it would be nice to have a house with more room for the 9 bikes. But then we'd have to spend weekends working on the house and yard instead of hiking and biking. If something breaks in the apt, we call the landlord. He's pretty good about getting things fixed right away.

A good book I like is Work Less & Play More by Steve Catlin.

smilin buddha 01-09-06 05:31 PM


Originally Posted by eofelis
I wonder about the house-buying thing....

I've heard the house called "the ultimate possession"

My parents never owned a house. They rented a very small house in a rural area when I was growing up. I had miles of woods and fields to roam in, and my parents didn't seem unhappy that they didn't own the house. After my dad passed away, my mom wanted to move closer to town. She gave 30 days notice and moved out (I had moved out before then). So it never really occured to me that you had to own a house.

My BF & I live in a 1 br apt over a 4 car garage. It's pretty nice, not too expensive, close to places we need to go. Sometimes it would be nice to have a house with more room for the 9 bikes. But then we'd have to spend weekends working on the house and yard instead of hiking and biking. If something breaks in the apt, we call the landlord. He's pretty good about getting things fixed right away.

A good book I like is Work Less & Play More by Steve Catlin.

Thanks for the tip. I ordered the book. And since I work at the library I am not purchasing it. I am sure for some the house is a good idea, but it is limiting now. ANd than with the bigger house came more crap. Than I have a few dogs and that adds more space constraints and also limitations. I would have so much more money and time with a smaller house, but I have to work with what I have now and see how simple I can live with what I got. I know if there is another hurricane season like the last one. I will be leaving the sunshine state. I hate to live weeks without power and the other troubles.

vrkelley 01-09-06 06:08 PM


Originally Posted by af895

To me, frugality means being ruthless with your money when other people want it so you still have some when YOU want to spend it.

MWA HAW HAW HAW...more tips please about your "ruthlessnes" to save money... we're quick learners on this forum
:p

goldener 01-09-06 07:35 PM

Let's see:

No car. I don't own a computer. I don't own a cell phone. I don't own a TV. I have never owned or worn any type of jewelry whatsoever. I have no piercings or tatoos. I have never used any type illegal drug whatsoever, and don't ever intend to. I try to limit emotions and drama to a minimum. I only drink alcohol approx. once a month. I don't own an ipod or any other type portable music player. I am single, and do not have any kids. I don't smoke cigs. I have never possessed a drivers' liscence or permit of any type. I have never driven an automobile in my life. I don't drink coffee or tea. I don't take any prescription drugs or over-the-counter medicines whatsoever.

I think that's it for now. I'm sure more will come to me.

Currently my vice is bikes. I have a basement full of bikes, frames, and parts in various states of function. I also own a bit of camping/backpacking equipment.



My friends, family, parents and everyone I meet thinks I am insane, a social reject, a druggie, a drifter, etc.

rnorris 01-09-06 08:15 PM

There but for sentimentality would I be.........

When I was in my 20's, I was proud that everything I owned fit into the back of a pickup truck. The collection of "stuff" grew with time, but I was able to keep the invading enemy mostly at bay (staying single helped). Then, about 20 years ago, it found a successful tactic: I couldn't part with icons from the people whose lives have touched me, especially family members who have passed away.

On a bookcase at home sits a Seth Thomas mantel clock from the 1920s. I don't even run it, but it sat atop a piano at the farmhouse of my grandparents, and it generates fond memories of spending summers with them. My mother's paintings really fight dirty; can't imagine getting rid of them now that she's gone. Little art projects my godsons made for me in school. An entire bookshelf of thousands of my slides from travels, kids' birthday parties, vacations, etc. Books my father had. I don't dwell on this stuff, but I appreciate it now in ways I couldn't when in my 20s. So the "stuff" has won on that battlefield, but I've only had to retreat the line of defense from that pickup load to a 1 bedroom apartment- so far.

buzzman 01-09-06 09:48 PM

I had a very simple lifestyle for a long time. Greatly influenced by what some might call poverty but to me I never felt poor- short on cash maybe but never poor- but as I look back I was right on the edge of living on the streets for quite a while. I do remember at that time wishing I was rich enough to be as poor as I chose to be. I was resourceful, intelligent and hard working enough to have taken jobs or made educational choices that would have put me in the money making track of many of my peers but I was a free lance artist and felt confident I could eventually make my living with my art. I was seeking a deeper satisfaction than that offered solely by material possession. Fortunately, I was right and my art has paid off.

However, the journey was not as easy as I'd thought in terms of keeping my life simple. Because I was used to having so little when I finally had the money to purchase more things I did so. I accumulated some worthwhile things and a lot of crap along the way. Because I had lived on my bicycle for long periods of time with only what I could bring on my bike I knew how little I could get by with and often felt ashamed by the accumulation of unnecessary junk. I had to commute a lot from Boston to New York and stopped using public transport and bought a brand new car that I loaded the miles on for the first time in my life. Those commutes translated into more earnings and I bought a condo. Locally I continued to commute by bike and bike race and tour when I had the time but I had a gnawing dissatisfaction.

Then one day I bought an abandoned house with four acres of land surrounded by 18,000 acres of state forest (for which I paid $20k cash). That shifted my focus. Suddenly I was reminded of how little I needed to be happy. This trashed little house with no windows, no electricity, no running water became my focus. My brand new car is now 11 years old and most extra cash goes into fixing that place up to make it livable. It now has a composting toilet, is hooked up to the grid but I have a combination of solar lights and low wattage lights and applicances and am working towards a combination of solar and wind power for the house.

I do think that paying rent was a form of perpetual debt worth getting out from under and my condo has doubled in value so that I am now essentially debt free if I want to unload it and put everything into the no longer abandoned house. It's difficult to live in a capitalistic economy without becoming either a pawn of the system or an aggressive, accumulator of wealth at the expense of the less fortunate. It's a balancing act of investing well and watching what you buy and where you buy it.

Ayn Rand's famous quote from the novel "The Fountainhead": "the best way to help the poor is not to be one of them." could either be a healthy self motivater or an excuse to trample your impoverished neighbors. I think the difference between a certain level of "poverty" and "a simple life style" are sometimes a state of mind but it's a hell of a lot easier to be "poor" with some money in the bank and decent health coverage than when you have neither of those things. I was fine with living day to day but having some cushion against catastrophe can mean the difference between continued independence and living off friends, family or the state. I have some friends who were poor right along with me 25 years ago and still are, despite many opportunities to improve their economic state, and I must admit how resentful I can be when I feel they think nothing of having me help subsidize their "simpler life styles". There's a big difference between being just plain cheap and selfish and being "simple" and this is a line that becomes clearer as a person ages. On the other hand I love that having more allows me to be more generous than I was ever able to be when I had barely enough for myself to get by so I'd rather err on the side of generosity and let go of any resentment when I feel taken advantage of- it ain't worth it. And, as Katrina so powerfully demonstrated, many of us are only one day of bad weather away from living with virtually nothing.

Dahon.Steve 01-09-06 09:59 PM


Originally Posted by eofelis
I wonder about the house-buying thing....

I've heard the house called "the ultimate possession"

My parents never owned a house. They rented a very small house in a rural area when I was growing up. I had miles of woods and fields to roam in, and my parents didn't seem unhappy that they didn't own the house. After my dad passed away, my mom wanted to move closer to town. She gave 30 days notice and moved out (I had moved out before then). So it never really occured to me that you had to own a house.

I would love to own a house. I've seen so many people buying homes recently with interest rates being low as they are today. It irks me to not have the downpayment to put down on a new home but the thought of borrowing hundreds of thousands and being in debt to my eyeballs scares the heck out of me. The least expensive home around my way are going for 275K and up and you need an income of 70K a year to qualify for the mortgage plus the 10% down payment and closing costs! It's just too much for me.

I don't know how people are buying all these homes at outragous prices can sleep at night. Home prices continue to go through the roof and I don't know when it's going to end but I'm priced out.

pakole 01-10-06 03:07 AM

You know this thread has made me reconsider the whole house thing as well. I know I do not have enough stuff for a house, and I would like to keep my married and eventually family life simple as well. Hmmm.. this is the first time I have ever given consideration over an houseless ending, but maybe a condo, or smaller. One of the big things of a house is high upkeep time input. Time is one thing I have in small amount..

iBarna 01-10-06 05:16 AM

Another thing I didn't mention before: I can never understand why people (at least people in cities) would ever have their own washer and dryer. They take up so much space, they need their own power circuit, water pipe, etc, you need to repair them, etc. In one word... HASSLE.

I just go to the laundromat on the block. They have better machines I could ever own. I don't even own my own detergent or softener, I buy those little "1 Load" boxes at the laundromat.


BTW, there are people in this thread who seem to be very ascetic. If that's what you want, more power to you! But personally I want to enjoy life to the fullest - I just don't want my life be cluttered by stuff.

I am pretty sure I will never own a house. I could see perhaps owning a condo... but as for now I enjoy the freedom of being able to move frequently!

pakole 01-10-06 09:40 AM

Well, one thing about living simple is that you live for yourself. Some people feel it less of a hassle to have their own washing machine then to have to go out and use the laundromat down the street. I thankfully have one in my own living group, but I have to look for an apartment soon, and I do not think that a washing machine will make or break a deal for me. Anyway, thanks again for starting this thread.

jamesdenver 01-10-06 09:57 AM

i bought a townhouse about 2 years ago and it was well worth it. i've done some heavy cosmetic improvements and have learned some interesting crafts like flooring, tiling, installing a toilet (ugh). and i'm planning on building some built in cabinets and bookcases. the money spent on a house is similar to putting money in a savings account or 401k, it does return a benefit, and i don't think being simple equates living paycheck to paycheck, in fact the opposite - people that are simple CAN make and save much more money tucked away, allowing them to sustain their simple lifestyle well into their future.

i had a great real estate agent right around the corner from me, and the whole process of looking at places was very enjoyable.

as noted in my previous posts i think "simplicity" is based more on philisophy, not stuff. i think a house if done right (based on price, resale/neighorhoods) is a great investment and can make a lot of money,

should they want to travel for a few years they'll more likely to have the resources to do it. (ok that's my goal in 6 years :)

buying a house isn't for everyone, but if you are motivated and have a good real estate agent it can be a good experience, and again money spent at home depot for improvements is different than money spent maintaining a car, but don't go in debt on a house either of course


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