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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

Drillium Dude 08-02-19 04:19 PM


Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 21057210)
brass brush....not steel very important

Thanks for noting that - and yeah, that makes total sense. Just like brass wool instead of steel wool won't scratch up chrome, I'm assuming the brass brush will go easier on the alloy/anodizing.

DD

CV-6 08-02-19 06:57 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21057186)
Since I have a lot of Dremel experience (!) I will try a wire brush attachment on it and go from there. Thanks for the suggestion!

The tape job I did recently for another Forum member was easy-peasy. Made it super-simple to locate the tire exactly where we wanted it, then you just pull the protective tape off and you're all set. Bob Freeman says tape holds much better, too - tho that can be a bit of a hassle when getting a tub off, I suppose.

DD

There is a trick to that. Leave the area between the spokes directly opposite the valve stem free of tape.

Drillium Dude 08-02-19 10:46 PM


Originally Posted by CV-6 (Post 21057425)
There is a trick to that. Leave the area between the spokes directly opposite the valve stem free of tape.

For balancing the wheel, correct?

DD

Wildwood 08-02-19 11:19 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21057642)
For balancing the wheel, correct?

Can't answer about removing the tape opposite valve stem, can't hurt. But it has to be negligible in a rolling environment with bearings under load of rider + bike, and with vibration induced from pavement. Still, no harm in seeking perfection.

What tires on your radar?
I'll guess Vittoria.
Checked the sale prices at www.probikekit.com and www.merlincycles.com and the prices are typical, but not hot deals. www.biketiresdirect.com is high, but faster delivery by a mile.

I need to buy a few tires, too. Only 2 if the new Vittoria Rallys 25mm are acceptable spares. Probably 4, as having a matching (and therefore permanent) replacement is more efficient.

Flatted an older Conti Giro, that came with a purchased wheelset. Got a good many useful miles out of it. But what to do now, given no replacement tanwall 23mm?

jimmuller 08-03-19 04:28 AM


Originally Posted by Wildwood (Post 21056674)
Not being a mileage man like yourself...

I thank you for the compliment. I have to mention that this "mileage man" has found fewer opportunities this summer to do serious mileage. Even so, most of it has been on tubulars.


Originally Posted by 79pmooney (Post 21056845)
(Crooked sewups only slow you down if you think about it.

I first read that as "If you think about it, crooked sewups only slow you down", which says almost the same thing but is completely different. I try not to think about it so they don't slow me down much at all.


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21056951)
I've taped but never glued tubulars. Think I'd like to stick with the tape. What say all of you?

You are welcome to stick with tape. That's what tape does, sticks to things. Better that the tire sticks to it than that you do however. (I use glue.)

speedevil 08-03-19 04:47 AM


Originally Posted by CV-6 (Post 21057425)
There is a trick to that. Leave the area between the spokes directly opposite the valve stem free of tape.

To give you a starting point when you need to remove the tubular. I always skipped the same section when I used glue, for that reason.

CV-6 08-03-19 08:31 AM


Originally Posted by speedevil (Post 21057783)
To give you a starting point when you need to remove the tubular. I always skipped the same section when I used glue, for that reason.

Exactly. I once spent a good deal of time at the side of the road trying to remove one of my tubulars before learning that tidbit. Arthritis in my thumbs can make it difficult. What was funny was the several people stopping to ask if I needed help. All I had to say was "tubular tire" and they got a blank look on their faces.

Drillium Dude 08-03-19 11:14 AM


Originally Posted by speedevil (Post 21057783)
To give you a starting point when you need to remove the tubular. I always skipped the same section when I used glue, for that reason.

I never would have thought of that in a million years. In a box, I am.

DD

jimmuller 08-03-19 11:16 AM

I have occasionally resorted to carrying plastic tire irons to use as levers to remove stuck sewups. Never had to though, at least not yet.

Drillium Dude 08-03-19 11:17 AM


Originally Posted by Wildwood (Post 21057662)
What tires on your radar?

None, actually - the tires that came on the Bianchi are in super shape, but the front is mounted opposite the rear and you know me and my OCD. Besides, I always overhaul a bike that's new to me and I don't know if I can trust the old glue.

DD

CV-6 08-03-19 12:14 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21058133)
I never would have thought of that in a million years. In a box, I am.

DD

Don't feel bad. I didn't figure that bit of info out for myself. But it sure is great to be able to pass it on.

jimmuller 08-03-19 12:34 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21058137)
None, actually - the tires that came on the Bianchi are in super shape, but the front is mounted opposite the rear and you know me and my OCD.

I can sympathize. I hate it when the front tire goes forward and the rear tire goes backwards. I never seem to get anywhere when that happens. I end up having to flip the rear wheel around.

DiabloScott 08-03-19 03:13 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21056951)
I've taped but never glued tubulars. Think I'd like to stick with the tape. What say all of you?

Advantages of tape: it's easy and not as messy if you're a tubular noob.

Advantages of glue: you decide how much is enough, you can just not put glue in the "easy to remove" section, you can put more glue on top of old glue, much easier to remove old glue, MUCH easier to replace a tire on the road, the satisfaction of having an old-school skill.

trailangel 08-03-19 03:19 PM

You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

iab 08-03-19 03:34 PM


Originally Posted by trailangel (Post 21058387)
You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

Use the tape in your jersey pocket?

CV-6 08-03-19 03:38 PM


Originally Posted by trailangel (Post 21058387)
You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

The first time I did have a flat on a taped tire, all the tape stayed on the tire. Last time was as you described. I carry some tape wrapped around a flat piece of plastic and a small knife. You put tape in the gaps and peel back part of the "cover" as you do when installing new. It can be difficult mounting the spare straight due to the "old" tape on the rim, but usually the idea is to get home, so it doesn't have to be perfect. Once mounted, remove the "cover" tape as in a new install.

jimmuller 08-03-19 03:48 PM

I find that swapping a glued tire is pretty quick most of the time. Would tape be faster or slower?

Drillium Dude 08-03-19 06:09 PM


Originally Posted by jimmuller (Post 21058418)
I find that swapping a glued tire is pretty quick most of the time. Would tape be faster or slower?

I'm retired so I'm not in a hurry anymore :)

I like the idea of carrying a spare tape roll in the tool bag. Why not? Light stuff.

DD

top506 08-03-19 06:41 PM

When I got back into sew-ups I tried tape for the first few sets, but went back to glue. It's really no big deal.

Top

qcpmsame 08-03-19 07:40 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21058137)
None, actually - the tires that came on the Bianchi are in super shape, but the front is mounted opposite the rear and you know me and my OCD. Besides, I always overhaul a bike that's new to me and I don't know if I can trust the old glue.

DD

Umm, its CDO, at least get the alphabetical order correct:innocent:

As to the current question, glue or tape, still gluing after all these years (apologies to Paul Simon.) Just never saw a reason to switch, and buying bulk flux brushes makes it easier than it ever was back when it was finding a hardware store or plumbing supply with someone stock.

Bill

Drillium Dude 08-04-19 02:14 AM


Originally Posted by qcpmsame (Post 21058714)
Umm, its CDO, at least get the alphabetical order correct:innocent:

As to the current question, glue or tape, still gluing after all these years (apologies to Paul Simon.) Just never saw a reason to switch, and buying bulk flux brushes makes it easier than it ever was back when it was finding a hardware store or plumbing supply with someone stock.

Bill

You know, it's funny but tape is the way I learned, too. I first ran tubulars in 1994 while in London, and since I didn't trust myself with making an indestructible bond between rim and tire, I had Condor Cycles tape up all my tires - that was their go-to method even back then. They removed and replaced them the 3/4 times I flatted them, too. So I never dealt with the icky part :)

But taping up the tubulars a couple months back was fun and I guess I can hope for the best that I don't puncture. I won't be running them all that often since they'll only be on one bike and I do a pretty good job rotating through at least 5 or 6 of them.

DD

smontanaro 08-04-19 04:58 AM

I've never used tape so can't comment on the relative ease of changing a flat. I have had tires which the PO had taped. Small PITA to get the little leftover nubs of tape off.

As for the no-glue-opposite-the-valve trick. I'm aware of it but never seen to remember to it while I'm applying glue to the rim. Hasn't been an issue removing the (thankfully rare) flat so far.

DiabloScott 08-04-19 12:03 PM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 21058949)

As for the no-glue-opposite-the-valve trick. I'm aware of it but never seen to remember to it while I'm applying glue to the rim. Hasn't been an issue removing the (thankfully rare) flat so far.

I don't do it either, I have an old tire lever in my cycling wallet to get the removal started if necessary. And I am always a little surprised at how hard they are to get off... a testament to my glue jobs.

markwesti 08-04-19 04:34 PM

It was a good day my friends . Got my Campy/Nisi wheels back from the LBS and they did a fine job lacing . The tires I'm using are NOS Giro d' Italia . I do my own thing when gluing , maybe it will bite me someday maybe not . I 1 coat the tire and rim , let dry and then 1 coat tire and rim and mount . Using (this time) Challenge mastic , it's a Italian build so Italian glue . Previously I had been using 3M Fast Tack , 1 thick coat on the rim and tire and mount . Never a problem . Many beers ago I used to let my buddy (Psycho Billie) ride one of my bikes and it had tubulars , anyway we had one mile to go after a 60 miler and Billie gets a flat . Typical Billie he flies into a rage and then starts crying , I'm like Billie no big deal I can fix it . At the time I was using tape and a Co2 cartridge for air . So I got to work , Billie was silent (for once) he had never seen tape and never filled with Co2 .
Anyhow the second picture with the blue tape is for holding the tire valve stem straight while pulling on the tire , works good .


https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...a6ae09b6_z.jpg
IMG_0401 by mark westi, on Flickr
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...fd24e4ae_z.jpg
IMG_0403 by mark westi, on Flickr

Wileyone 08-04-19 05:00 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21057186)
Since I have a lot of Dremel experience (!) I will try a wire brush attachment on it and go from there. Thanks for the suggestion!

The tape job I did recently for another Forum member was easy-peasy. Made it super-simple to locate the tire exactly where we wanted it, then you just pull the protective tape off and you're all set. Bob Freeman says tape holds much better, too - tho that can be a bit of a hassle when getting a tub off, I suppose.

DD

Don't use a Dremel tool.

Use one of these.

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...89e7634296.jpg


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