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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

obuckler 10-10-23 03:58 PM

There are lots of ways to handle a flat in a tubular tire on the road (this is a disclaimer!).

My choice is this: I carry a spare tubular tire under my seat and a single canister of compressed air and one of those inflator heads that just screw on to the canister threaded top.

I have not actually weighed that all up but do not think it would weigh much more or less than what I carry for my clincher bikes (a seat bag, spare tube, tire lever, same inflation system, and a tire patch for deep cuts).

Changing a tire out on the road is quick and easy and for me quicker than a clincher flat tube change. Rip one off and throw the other one on. No need to check a clincher out for embedded glass or thorns, make sure the new tube wonít pinch flat and the valve is vertical, etc.

With a proper glue (or tape) job the removal should be easy, just push it off to start then it goes fast.

I then patch the flat at home. Since I patch I donít use any sealant because of the mess.

Of course remove and remount a tire at home first if youíre new at it to make sure you can physically do it.

Last disclaimer: i rotate my rides between six bikes. The bike that I am on is always my favorite bike, all for different reasons. Three are clincher setups and three are tubular setups. I always find riding the tubulars to be a much more sublime experience. For one, thatís how those bikes were sold. For two Ö(there is no two Öitís probably all in my head).

obrentharris 10-10-23 04:21 PM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 23038956)
In my limited experience with using leak stopper such as Stans, Tufo, etc., be careful because if your bike is parked long enough, the sealant migrates to the lowest point and the sealant hardens, which In turn ruins the tube and tire balance.

In my experience "long enough" is an important distinction. I have three bikes with tubulars. None of them ever sit unridden for more than two or three months. In the four or five years that I have been putting sealant (Orange Seal) in my tires I have not had the above mentioned problem.
Brent

WGB 10-10-23 04:51 PM

obrentharris and pastorbobnlnh

Thank you. I was just about to post the question
"How long is too long for tubulars to sit with sealant?"

In late August I installed brand new Continental Competitions and they were not cheap!
Within 100 miles I had a pinhole leak. I added Orange Seal inspite of warnings from friends that it would harden in my tire. I calculated it was better to have some life out of the tire than no life.

I'd still like to see more than two-three months of riding on this tire.

I live in Southern Ontario and wonder if the sealant gets cold enough and freezes, will it harden and stay hard?

If I take each bike and spin the wheels once each month for say twenty to thirty revolutions will that be enough? I can't really ride a road bike here between say mid December until early April. I don't really have a place to store wheels in the house.

obuckler 10-10-23 06:06 PM

(Removed double post. Oops)

MooneyBloke 10-10-23 06:30 PM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 23038956)
In my limited experience with using leak stopper such as Stans, Tufo, etc., be careful because if your bike is parked long enough, the sealant migrates to the lowest point and the sealant hardens, which In turn ruins the tube and tire balance.

I've had thought of taking a coarse tube and a syringe to remove excess sealant at the end of the season.

One thing I have noticed is if you try to patch a tube with Stan's later on, it's a bit of a bugger getting the tube to lie in a way you want to stick on the patch.

All that being said, Stan's has gotten me home on three occasions without wasting a CO₂ cartridge, so I'm reluctant to give it up.

pastorbobnlnh 10-10-23 07:43 PM

I should have mentioned the sealant I used once and experienced the hardening with was Effetto Mariposa. But I can probably blame myself. I let the bike sit for over 6 months without moving it.

obrentharris 10-10-23 08:03 PM


Originally Posted by WGB (Post 23039216)
obrentharris and pastorbobnlnh

Thank you. I was just about to post the question
"How long is too long for tubulars to sit with sealant?"

In late August I installed brand new Continental Competitions and they were not cheap!
Within 100 miles I had a pinhole leak. I added Orange Seal inspite of warnings from friends that it would harden in my tire. I calculated it was better to have some life out of the tire than no life.

I'd still like to see more than two-three months of riding on this tire.

I live in Southern Ontario and wonder if the sealant gets cold enough and freezes, will it harden and stay hard?

If I take each bike and spin the wheels once each month for say twenty to thirty revolutions will that be enough? I can't really ride a road bike here between say mid December until early April. I don't really have a place to store wheels in the house.

I think your plan of spinning the wheels once a month is a good one. Probably just a couple of revolutions is enough. Maybe make sure you don't leave the same section of tire at the bottom after each spin session so that any thin skin of latex that might form won't be right on top of another thin skin. One word of caution; the sealant only stays liquid for a finite time. The manufacturers say 6 or 7 months, I think. I think this is worst case scenario in mountain bike tires that have a large volume of air to react with the sealant and hasten its demise. My experience with MTB tires is that the sealant hardens and forms gooey little rocks within a year, but my tires don't usually last that long so my experience is limited. I have one set of tubulars that still has liquid sealant that I installed in April of 2021, so I think the issue is not quite so pressing in smaller volume tires.
Brent

1989Pre 10-11-23 04:09 AM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 23038648)
I've often wanted a :dopeslap: emoticon, generally applied to myself...

That's harsh.

smontanaro 10-11-23 04:20 AM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 23039505)
That's harsh.

Perhaps you overestimate my mechanical abilities. ;)

kcblair 10-11-23 08:07 AM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 23039345)
I should have mentioned the sealant I used once and experienced the hardening with was Effetto Mariposa. But I can probably blame myself. I let the bike sit for over 6 months without moving it.

Ah Ha ! I have a tube of that sealant, unopened, since 2020, it is like jelly. I ordered some new Tufo sealant for this current project. KB

kcblair 10-11-23 08:18 AM

Okay Guys, Here's another discussion , I just checked a set of wheels that have been hanging for 3 years . I can here solidified sealant in one of the tubs. Brand new set of Conti Giro's. Add some sealant and use them or loose them ? I do believe i was using Stan's at the time I mounted the tubs.

Moving forward, I'm going to stay with Tufo Tubs. Use Tufo sealant and carry a Stealth Tubeless Puncture Plug 75% Off (@ Muc-Off) . And as PastorBob suggests , rotate the wheels once a month or so .

Thanks

smontanaro 10-11-23 09:06 AM

I will be experimenting with tubular tape for the first time. Ellen and I are headed out to Portland to visit our son and grandson. I'll be working in a bike I've yet to lay my eyes on. I shipped out a couple packages with parts and tools, but forgot to send any glue for the tubular rims. I didn't think it worth the risk to try and carry a can of Mastik One on the flight (> 3.5oz & flammable to boot). I could have tried to buy some locally or shipped to a local shop (@gugie said there's a Universal Cycles shop in Beaverton). Instead, I opted for some Jantex tape bought from Amazon which should arrive at my son's place on Monday.

79pmooney 10-11-23 09:22 AM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 23039684)
I will be experimenting with tubular tape for the first time. Ellen and I are headed out to Portland to visit our son and grandson. I'll be working in a bike I've yet to lay my eyes on. I shipped out a couple packages with parts and tools, but forgot to send any glue for the tubular rims. I didn't think it worth the risk to try and carry a can of Mastik One on the flight (> 3.5oz & flammable to boot). I could have tried to buy some locally or shipped to a local shop (@gugie said there's a Universal Cycles shop in Beaverton). Instead, I opted for some Jantex tape bought from Amazon which should arrive at my son's place on Monday.

I rode Cycle Oregon on the Jantex tape with no issues. I love how you mount the tires. Easy to get the tire on as straight as it is sewn. Follow the instruction to the letter. Tire mounted straight on top of the clear plastic. Don't push down on the tire. Doing so may mean the plastic tears as you pull it out.

I haven't tried to take a tire off yet. Don't know what I am in for. I hope my hands and a steel tire iron are up for the job.

Vitma 11-10-23 06:30 PM

Hello everyone,

I want to reuse an already and 1.5 year ago glued 28mm tubular on another rim. Can i just take off the tubular and put it onto the other rim and do I need/can clean the 28mm tubular before I put it on the new rim?

Thank you.

Classtime 11-10-23 07:26 PM

If there is no glue on the other rim, I’d put two thin layers of glue on it and move the tire over. I just did something similar. There was glue already on the other rim so I put one thin fresh layer and moved the tire over. .

DiabloScott 11-10-23 07:49 PM


Originally Posted by Vitma (Post 23068473)
I want to reuse an already and 1.5 year ago glued 28mm tubular on another rim. Can i just take off the tubular and put it onto the other rim and do I need/can clean the 28mm tubular before I put it on the new rim?

I'd probably add a little fresh glue to the tire after you pull it off, and let it get tacky before you put it on the new rim... which of course should be prepped as noted.

Vitma 11-11-23 10:31 AM

Thank you for the feedback.

If I want to re-use the rim, from which I took the tire off (glued 1.5 years ago), should I remove all glue and prep it again or could I just add a layer of glue and get a new and prepped tubular on?

MooneyBloke 11-11-23 10:45 AM


Originally Posted by Vitma (Post 23069063)
Thank you for the feedback.

If I want to re-use the rim, from which I took the tire off (glued 1.5 years ago), should I remove all glue and prep it again or could I just add a layer of glue and get a new and prepped tubular on?

Unless the base glue is so thick and knobby that the base tape won't get good adhesion, just apply your fresh glue over the old. The base glue has to get more than a little nasty before I'll strip a rim as it's a truly awful job.

DiabloScott 11-26-23 11:14 AM

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e3ba19a330.jpg
Tubular Bells

1989Pre 11-26-23 02:27 PM


Originally Posted by MooneyBloke (Post 23005540)
Originally Posted by 1989Pre
I pump my tires up to around 110-115. I don't like going much higher because then my ride becomes too bouncy and is not comfortable.

That was a quote from The Bikesmiths blog.

ChromeChainstay 11-27-23 09:29 AM


Originally Posted by luker (Post 1830374)
i usta really like the Tubular Bells album...(am I showing my age?)


my roomate in college, in the 80's, turned me onto them 👍

seagrade 11-28-23 01:00 AM


Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 23082749)

Finally a frame that almost matches the green stripe of a Vittoria Pave.

One of the great and enduring pro team colour schemes.

ascherer 12-07-23 01:34 PM

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...49cb20c63e.jpg
700 x 30 for $48 USD https://www.excelsports.com/vittoria...ire?sku=743009

SJX426 12-08-23 08:53 AM

@ascherer - Thanks for that post. 3 ordered. They will fit on the Bianchi but not the Pin or De Rosa.

WRT sealant solidifying, I don't use it because of that feature. I don't ride enough, and I have a number of choices to ride. I would rather fix a flat than throw an " expensive" good tire away.

MooneyBloke 12-08-23 03:26 PM


Originally Posted by SJX426 (Post 23094286)
WRT sealant solidifying, I don't use it because of that feature. I don't ride enough...


Easy solution: ride more. More seriously, Stan's has saved my bacon a number of times this past summer, and while I'll freely admit that it makes patching a tire more painful, it's IMNSHO well worth the bother. Also, It doesn't hurt to spin the wheels every now and then just to redistribute the stuff even if you're not riding.

ascherer 12-26-23 05:11 PM

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...56544461f.jpeg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...264003861.jpeg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...851406243.jpeg
Laced, dished, and trued. I got lucky and was able to directly swap these rims into a wheel set with Super Champion Gentleman rims using the same spokes with new nipples.

Schwinn-Approved ď330Ē tubular rims (may be Super Champion Arc en Ciel), Campagnolo Nuovo Record high-flange hubs, DT 14 gauge/2.0mm spokes, Vittoria Corsa Graphene 2.0 30mm tires. For now the tires are stretching until a shipment of Effeto Mariposa Carogna adhesive arrives. Canít wait to try them!

masi61 12-27-23 10:39 AM


Originally Posted by MooneyBloke (Post 23094761)
Easy solution: ride more. More seriously, Stan's has saved my bacon a number of times this past summer, and while I'll freely admit that it makes patching a tire more painful, it's IMNSHO well worth the bother. Also, It doesn't hurt to spin the wheels every now and then just to redistribute the stuff even if you're not riding.

Mucking up a good latex inner tube with tubeless sealant just seems like a waste to me. Even if you stay on top of maintenance, you are only prolonging the inevitable. Eventually that latex tube inside your tubular is going to start acting funny. Inflating and deflating will get dodgy I would think. And the lovely low rolling resistance afforded by latex tubes I would think would be sacrificed for flat prevention from the latex sealant.

79pmooney 12-27-23 10:58 AM


Originally Posted by masi61 (Post 23111900)
Mucking up a good latex inner tube with tubeless sealant just seems like a waste to me. Even if you stay on top of maintenance, you are only prolonging the inevitable. Eventually that latex tube inside your tubular is going to start acting funny. Inflating and deflating will get dodgy I would think. And the lovely low rolling resistance afforded by latex tubes I would think would be sacrificed for flat prevention from the latex sealant.

I'm getting back into tubulars after 25 years off. Street glass and debris is a bigger problem now than it was back then. An ounce of sealant has (so far/knock on wood) meant fewer flats than the old days. A real blessing with the arthritis in my hands. I remember how hard it was to pull off the base tape to repair tires back then with my hands at their strongest.

Yes, inflating and deflating gets dodgy, but not quickly in my experience with the one ounce of sealant I add. And replacing valves is just not very hard. My plan is to send a box worth of tubulars to one of those repair guys to retube the worthy ones when I get there. Sounds to me like they have the procedure down pat and have the hands to do it.

masi61 12-27-23 11:33 AM


Originally Posted by 79pmooney (Post 23111923)
I'm getting back into tubulars after 25 years off. Street glass and debris is a bigger problem now than it was back then. An ounce of sealant has (so far/knock on wood) meant fewer flats than the old days. A real blessing with the arthritis in my hands. I remember how hard it was to pull off the base tape to repair tires back then with my hands at their strongest.

Yes, inflating and deflating gets dodgy, but not quickly in my experience with the one ounce of sealant I add. And replacing valves is just not very hard. My plan is to send a box worth of tubulars to one of those repair guys to retube the worthy ones when I get there. Sounds to me like they have the procedure down pat and have the hands to do it.

To me, rather than re-tubing a used tubular, it would be more cost effective to stay on alert for good buys on new tubulars of the quality level you seek. I just purchased some Schwalbe “hand made” tubulars from Condor Cycles in England for ~$51 each. They look well made. The tubular tire repair service in Florida (Tire Alert ?) I want to say charges like 35 or more to extract a tube then sew in a new butyl or latex tube. I would have to really love a magic carpet ride set of tubulars to go to this length to keep them on the road.

Edit: turns out they charge $42 to put in a new butyl inner tube and base tape: PRICES | tirealert

MooneyBloke 12-27-23 12:30 PM


Originally Posted by masi61 (Post 23111900)
Mucking up a good latex inner tube with tubeless sealant just seems like a waste to me.

That has not been my experience, but you do you. Again, this season, Stan's has saved my bacon on multiple occasions, so I think I will continue the practice. Also, the Veloflex sew-ups I like to ride are pushing $100 a piece, so I'd like to get as much value (km) out of them as I can.


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