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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

johnnyspaghetti 03-24-18 05:22 PM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20243352)
28 inch? I bet he meant 23 inch?

My friend Jolio beat me to it. Fair & square.

BigChief 03-24-18 05:31 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Can't blame people for thinking DL-1s are older than they actually are. Here's it's ancestor.
A 1936 Model 1 Not a whole lot different.

Attachment 604488

johnnyspaghetti 03-24-18 05:41 PM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20243352)
28 inch? I bet he meant 23 inch?

28" wheel.

Ballenxj 03-24-18 06:01 PM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20243438)
28" wheel.

28" wheel? I guess I'm over my head in trying to figure these things out. :crash:

BigChief 03-24-18 07:22 PM

OOOH YEAH...Those big 28" wheels and check out the slack frame angles. Not for everybody, but they have a loyal and enthusiastic following. Wonderful bikes.

arty dave 03-25-18 03:36 PM

I'd have a 2nd in a flash If I came across one. Love the ride quality of the slack angles. I never see them here though (Australia)

thumpism 03-25-18 06:32 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20243464)
28" wheel? I guess I'm over my head in trying to figure these things out. :crash:

You'll figure it out and soon you'll spot 'em at a glance. 23" for the frame is wrong also; in modern times the men's frame was made only in 24" (the most commonly found size) and 22". Here's a pic of my 22" for comparison.
Attachment 604654

RobHalligan 03-26-18 07:18 AM

Nicelite LED Conversions
 

Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20191051)
I've got my first Dynohub project coming up and I was wondering what to do about the bulbs. Right now the system has two ancient filament bulbs that aren't working. The hub is producing current and there's continuity through the wires and the 3 position switch. So, I need to replace the bulbs with something. The only thing I can find on the internet are these Nicelite LED conversions. There's a component that attaches to the hub terminals that supposedly protects the LED from voltage spikes. Anybody here use these? I don't plan on night riding. I just want the lights to be functional. I'd be happy with the old fashioned bulbs if I could find them. Any thoughts? Thanks

I bought Nicelite LEDs and a rectifier thingy to run between the Dynohub terminals from NICELITE SUPER LED LIGHT BULBS in the UK. They were helpful and it works great.

Ballenxj 03-26-18 10:12 AM


Originally Posted by RobHalligan (Post 20245653)
I bought Nicelite LEDs and a rectifier thingy to run between the Dynohub terminals from NICELITE SUPER LED LIGHT BULBS in the UK. They were helpful and it works great.

I have to wonder how well a modernized head and tail lamp would work if you upgraded to LED's and put a capacitor in the assembly might work with a Dyno Hub? You would then have the best of both worlds. Both retro, and function...

RobHalligan 03-26-18 11:03 AM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20246024)
I have to wonder how well a modernized head and tail lamp would work if you upgraded to LED's and put a capacitor in the assembly might work with a Dyno Hub? You would then have the best of both worlds. Both retro, and function...

Wonder no more. It's great. I have a pile of bike's and my bike with the Dynohub LEDs is my daily driver. You don't have to worry about batteries, turning them on/off, or blowing a bulb.

bazil4696 03-26-18 11:10 AM

I'm astounded there is no retro styled refit kit to buy for these old dynohub powered lights. I read an article a few years ago how to use bridge rectifiers, capacitors, and a copper heatsink to power an LED array, but, there must be thousands of dynohubs ready for an upgrade, I'd need mine with a phone charger built in too... C'mon people! why is there no modern upgrade?

Ballenxj 03-26-18 11:17 AM


Originally Posted by RobHalligan (Post 20246139)
Wonder no more. It's great. I have a pile of bike's and my bike with the Dynohub LEDs is my daily driver. You don't have to worry about batteries, turning them on/off, or blowing a bulb.

My suspicions confirmed, thanks. :thumb:

boattail71 03-26-18 05:49 PM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 20245039)
You'll figure it out and soon you'll spot 'em at a glance. 23" for the frame is wrong also; in modern times the men's frame was made only in 24" (the most commonly found size) and 22". Here's a pic of my 22" for comparison.
Attachment 604654

That's a awesome rear carrier. When did Raleigh stop making those? : )

Anyway, thanks for the 24/22 info. Do you know what the sizes for the women's frames were?

Chaser95 03-26-18 07:10 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20242474)
Yup, As I get older I find I have to make all sorts of "adjustments" in my life. Being able to fine tune the overall gearing goes a long way to making these old 3 speeds practical riders. My DL-1 came from the factory with 46x16 cogs. I'm just not strong enough to mash a big roadster up hills with those ratios anymore. The change to 46x22 made all the difference for me. Looking forward to seeing your Robin Hood come along. Scorcher builds are fun. Might have to do another myself sometime.

While I have the Western Flyer apart I have thought changing to a 22 rear cog would be good. What, if any, changes are required for the chain? Thanks!

johnnyspaghetti 03-26-18 07:21 PM


Originally Posted by Chaser95 (Post 20247020)
While I have the Western Flyer apart I have thought changing to a 22 rear cog would be good. What, if any, changes are required for the chain? Thanks!

If you replace a 18 tooth with 22 you need 4 more links to position the wheel as it was in the rear dropouts.

Chaser95 03-26-18 07:23 PM

Thank you sir!

thumpism 03-26-18 08:56 PM


Originally Posted by boattail71 (Post 20246841)
That's a awesome rear carrier. When did Raleigh stop making those? : )

Anyway, thanks for the 24/22 info. Do you know what the sizes for the women's frames were?

They were made with either a curved upper down tube (called a "loop" frame or "crescent") or a straight upper down tube, what most would call a typical ladies' frame, probably in 20" or 22" but I'm not certain about that. I'm sure a Tourist pro will chime in with specifics.

gster 03-27-18 04:30 AM

1969 Robin Hood
 
1 Attachment(s)
So, I did go out last weekend to pick up this tall frame, as well as a box of assorted useful parts.
Attachment 604833
Turned out to be a stalled project bike. The young owner had trouble with the cotters and moved on to a 1962 Glider 3 speed instead. His Glider inherited the hub from the Robin Hood and I, in turn have the '62 hub.
His '62 turned out quite nice and he'll send me some photos which I'll post.
I'll post some shots this weekend and update the progress.
BTW, I managed to get the cotters out with a couple of good whacks..

gster 03-27-18 04:37 AM


Originally Posted by Chaser95 (Post 20247020)
While I have the Western Flyer apart I have thought changing to a 22 rear cog would be good. What, if any, changes are required for the chain? Thanks!

You may find that the rear wheel will sit a little further back in the drop outs and you have to adjust the rear fender as well.

Salubrious 03-27-18 09:58 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20247438)
Turned out to be a stalled project bike. The young owner had trouble with the cotters and moved on to a 1962 Glider 3 speed instead. His Glider inherited the hub from the Robin Hood and I, in turn have the '62 hub.
His '62 turned out quite nice and he'll send me some photos which I'll post.
I'll post some shots this weekend and update the progress.
BTW, I managed to get the cotters out with a couple of good whacks..

Yet another candidate for a cotter press!

If you whack them out, you run the risk of damaging the bearing cups, bearings and bottom bracket axle, the crank arm(s), plus the cotters themselves. If your whack is unsuccessful, drilling might become the only option, and the resulting damage to the axle can be heartbreaking- they are not that common any more. The original cotters are usually much harder than the new ones you find these days, and if your bike has the 'Raleigh nuts' retaining the cotters, they probably won't be usable with a replacement.

Cotter pins are meant to be removed and installed with a cotter press. The nut is merely used to retain the cotter once pressed into place. There are vintage units, which usually go for a lot of money on ebay or at swap meets, and there are newer units like this one:

New Crank Cotter Press

I've had one of these for several years and it has long since paid for itself!

You can also use C-clamps as a press- a bit more tricky, but a less expensive alternative.

Ballenxj 03-27-18 10:08 AM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20247032)
If you replace a 18 tooth with 22 you need 4 more links to position the wheel as it was in the rear dropouts.

That formula seems to add one link per additional tooth on the rear sprocket? That actually makes sense. ;)

browngw 03-27-18 10:09 AM

2 Attachment(s)
While at a Sports/ Bicycle(Giant) shop in a neighbouring town this morning, I spied these in an old drawer while looking for a brake hanger for centre pull brakes. I picked up some tubes and pedals and the springs were thrown in for free. Looks like a lifetime supply of both SA and Shimano pawl springs. Must be more than a 100.

johnnyspaghetti 03-27-18 10:23 AM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20247985)
That formula seems to add one link per additional tooth on the rear sprocket? That actually makes sense. ;)

It would be better to take the old chain and wrap it around the sprockets and measure the distance it's short. 1 link = 1/2 inch.

Thinking about it the sprocket is a larger diameter but the chain only wraps around half of it.

So my my link per cog theory could be flawed.
I did change a crank from 46 to 48 tooth recently and it needed 2 links pressed in.

This particular chain had 1/2 links where the masterlink joins that look like this.

Left to right is first a half link , then a masterlink w/link, then link, pins & plates.

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...1&disp=safe&zw

boattail71 03-27-18 06:02 PM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 20247192)
They were made with either a curved upper down tube (called a "loop" frame or "crescent") or a straight upper down tube, what most would call a typical ladies' frame, probably in 20" or 22" but I'm not certain about that. I'm sure a Tourist pro will chime in with specifics.

Those "loop" or "crescent" are much older. Right? Frame would be measured center-to-top on seat tube. Right?

boattail71 03-27-18 06:07 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20247438)
So, I did go out last weekend to pick up this tall frame, as well as a box of assorted useful parts.
Attachment 604833
Turned out to be a stalled project bike. The young owner had trouble with the cotters and moved on to a 1962 Glider 3 speed instead. His Glider inherited the hub from the Robin Hood and I, in turn have the '62 hub.
His '62 turned out quite nice and he'll send me some photos which I'll post.
I'll post some shots this weekend and update the progress.
BTW, I managed to get the cotters out with a couple of good whacks..

What is a "Glider?"

Sorry for my ignorance

johnnyspaghetti 03-27-18 06:32 PM

[QUOTE=boattail71;20249035]What is a "Glider?"

Sorry for my ignorance[/QumUOTE]The chain case is vinyl fabric on Holland dutch sucks sjob for chain cover sucks. I meant it. Yes I am continuyion. derilliom.ciramic disicetirorum

boattail71 03-27-18 06:52 PM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20249069)
The chain case is vinyl fabric on Hoallnd dutch job for chain cover suck

Um... what? Repeat. What is a "Glider?" Someone help an average Joe who is learning to appreciate our/my English finds.

Again, sorry for ignorance.

clubman 03-27-18 07:01 PM


Originally Posted by boattail71 (Post 20249091)
Um... what? Repeat. What is a "Glider?" Someone help an average Joe who is learning to appreciate our/my English finds.

Again, sorry for ignorance.

Sorry Glider is a Raleigh rebrand, distributed in Canada by The T. Eaton Department chain. Pretty much clones of the Raleigh line from the 60's on. The Glider name goes further back than Eatons Raleigh though, I had a twin bar beauty that was probably pre-war and was a Birmingham bike. No pics, but it happened.

boattail71 03-27-18 08:10 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20249103)
Sorry Glider is a Raleigh rebrand, distributed in Canada by The T. Eaton Department chain. Pretty much clones of the Raleigh line from the 60's on. The Glider name goes further back than Eatons Raleigh though, I had a twin bar beauty that was probably pre-war and was a Birmingham bike. No pics, but it happened.

Thanks, Club. So Gliders are not common here in the States. Yes? Hence my ignorance as a life-long Coloradoan. I'll try to be happy with my limited knowledge of my shy English stable including Raleigh, Hercules, Robin Hood, and Western Flyer (Norman), and I think I have a Sun somewhere. Regardless, I'll try to glide over arcane brands I'm likely not gonna see anytime soon. Logic appreciable? Gliding info is appreciable of course - don't wanna sound callus. Thanks all! And keep informing me/us.

--Ignorant but trying.

Ballenxj 03-27-18 09:22 PM


Originally Posted by boattail71 (Post 20249209)
I'll try to be happy with my limited knowledge of my shy English stable including Raleigh, Hercules, Robin Hood, and Western Flyer (Norman), and I think I have a Sun somewhere.

Western Flyer? Were some of those made in England? I always thought they were all built in the U.S.?


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