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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

thumpism 05-26-16 06:53 AM

Two different Raleigh Superbes on CL.
 
These two showed up this morning. The first is in nicer shape but costs almost twice what the second does. Both are 23" frames. Get yours now!
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Vintage Mens Raleigh Superbe 3 speed Bicycle

Vintage Mens Raleigh Superbe 3 speed Bicycle - $375 (Richmond) hide this posting

http://images.craigslist.org/00z0z_9...cb_600x450.jpg

Floyd Ave

condition: excellent
make / manufacturer: Raleigh
model name / number: Superbe
size / dimensions: 23" or 58.5cm

Vintage men's Raleigh Superbe, very rare and collectable bike, hard to find English bike model, made in England back when they where still making them there, 100% original bike. Local pickup only and no checks or money orders, cash only.

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Vintage RALEIGH SUPERBE Sturmey Archer 3 Speed Mens Bicycle

Vintage RALEIGH SUPERBE Sturmey Archer 3 Speed Mens Bicycle - $200 (Richmond@Forest Hill Park) hide this posting

http://images.craigslist.org/00U0U_h...dd_600x450.jpg

west 33rd st at forest hill ave

condition: good

Good looking Raleigh Superbe three speed bike circa 1970

Made in England, all original, handsome for being 45 years young, or a great restoration project for the perfectionist/ re-seller.
No fair offer will be refused. Cash & Carry. Thanks.

BigChief 05-26-16 08:58 AM

I'm going to try something I haven't done before. I'm going to restore one of those cheaply made original equipment saddle bags for my 64 Sports project bike. These were not made to last. I remember, even years and years ago, the cheap leather straps tended to get brittle and break. The body is made from leatherette glued to a canvas type material. The sides are reinforced with a thin, masonite type of material attached with poorly plated rivets. The front panel isn't reinforced at all and tends to sag in the middle. The 3 straps in the back are only threaded through loops so only need to be copied, but the lid straps are stitched on, so I'll need to cut the threads to remove them. The leatherette is in good condition and the buckles all look good and are reusable. I even bought a chrome pump for it so it has a bit more like the show room look. I wasn't originally, but I've decided to keep this bike. Hard to put into words, but it just appeals to me. I love riding it.
http://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f.../saddlebag.jpghttp://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f...ech/64comp.jpg

Salubrious 05-26-16 09:58 AM

@BigChief, I had good success repairing a saddlebag like that by taking it to a shoe repair shop. They made new leather strips using the old buckles and I was down the road.

DQRider 05-26-16 10:05 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18798437)
I'm going to try something I haven't done before. I'm going to restore one of those cheaply made original equipment saddle bags for my 64 Sports project bike. These were not made to last. I remember, even years and years ago, the cheap leather straps tended to get brittle and break. The body is made from leatherette glued to a canvas type material. The sides are reinforced with a thin, masonite type of material attached with poorly plated rivets. The front panel isn't reinforced at all and tends to sag in the middle. The 3 straps in the back are only threaded through loops so only need to be copied, but the lid straps are stitched on, so I'll need to cut the threads to remove them. The leatherette is in good condition and the buckles all look good and are reusable. I even bought a chrome pump for it so it has a bit more like the show room look. I wasn't originally, but I've decided to keep this bike. Hard to put into words, but it just appeals to me. I love riding it.

Well, I guess if it's that "showroom" look you are after, that's the way to do it. Personally, if I'm going to ride a bike, I want it to be the best that I can make it - originality takes a back seat to function. But if you want to display a bike, even take it to shows, then original is the only way to go, and patina is important.

We have this guy locally: Raleigh - British - 3 speed touring bag (NOS)

http://images.craigslist.org/00C0C_5...9G_600x450.jpg

He's selling what he calls a "Japanese NOS copy" of the original Raleigh bags for forty bucks. I would be tempted to give that a try. But if you are doing it in order to fill some time and expand your skillset, then I understand the impulse to DIY. Good luck with that, as they say...

BigChief 05-26-16 10:31 AM

I've already sacrificed some originality for function. I used a German Fleischer kickstand instead of one of the Raleigh footed alloy stands. The Raleigh stand is too tippy for me. A good breeze can blow the bike over. I also used a 22T cog in back just because the lower gearing makes riding more enjoyable for me. I'm doing this purely for fun. Besides, I don't have another project bike in the pipeline. I do like that saddle bag on the red bike though.

Roll-Monroe-Co 05-26-16 10:34 AM

Does anybody make those bags? It seems simple enough.

Quebber 05-26-16 10:40 AM

@DQRider, by coincidence, here is another 78 DL1 without the flash:
Vintage Raleigh Tourist 3 Speed w Rod Brakes Nottingham England | eBay

Salubrious 05-26-16 10:48 AM

There's a guy here in the Twin Cities that makes really nice seat bags for about $125. His name is Russell Bourrienne 612.709.7327 They are his own design and he does a lot of custom work. One I saw on the Lake Pepin Tour had a British flag motif built into the construction.

w1gfh 05-26-16 11:01 AM

If you can forgo instant gratification, make an eBay alert for "vintage bicycle saddlebag". NOS bags come up every once in a while, usually very reasonable.

Grand Bois 05-26-16 11:09 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18798776)
I've already sacrificed some originality for function. I used a German Fleischer kickstand instead of one of the Raleigh footed alloy stands. The Raleigh stand is too tippy for me. A good breeze can blow the bike over. I also used a 22T cog in back just because the lower gearing makes riding more enjoyable for me. I'm doing this purely for fun. Besides, I don't have another project bike in the pipeline. I do like that saddle bag on the red bike though.

Do you mean a Swiss Pletscher kickstand?

BigChief 05-26-16 11:39 AM


Originally Posted by Grand Bois (Post 18798906)
Do you mean a Swiss Pletscher kickstand?

No, it's Fleischer. Made in W.Germany. There's also a logo with the letters ESGE. These are my favorite stands for 3 speeds.

3speedslow 05-26-16 12:01 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18798437)
I'm going to try something I haven't done before. I'm going to restore one of those cheaply made original equipment saddle bags for my 64 Sports project bike. These were not made to last. I remember, even years and years ago, the cheap leather straps tended to get brittle and break. The body is made from leatherette glued to a canvas type material. The sides are reinforced with a thin, masonite type of material attached with poorly plated rivets. The front panel isn't reinforced at all and tends to sag in the middle. The 3 straps in the back are only threaded through loops so only need to be copied, but the lid straps are stitched on, so I'll need to cut the threads to remove them. The leatherette is in good condition and the buckles all look good and are reusable. I even bought a chrome pump for it so it has a bit more like the show room look. I wasn't originally, but I've decided to keep this bike. Hard to put into words, but it just appeals to me. I love riding it.

Following your bag strap renew with interest. I have one with quickly deteriorating straps.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=523676
http://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f.../saddlebag.jpghttp://i536.photobucket.com/albums/f...ech/64comp.jpg

one seriously nice bike BTW!

DQRider 05-26-16 12:41 PM


Originally Posted by Quebber (Post 18798803)
@DQRider, by coincidence, here is another 78 DL1 without the flash:
Vintage Raleigh Tourist 3 Speed w Rod Brakes Nottingham England | eBay

Ah yes, there we go. If mine had looked like that when I bought it, I would have gone the preservation route as well. That is just a nice, honest, well looked-after bike. Of course, I wouldn't have gotten mine for $35 if it looked like that. As I may have said here before, mine was quite a bit worse for wear, but from neglect instead of use. It sat outside as yard art for much, if not most, of its life. It deserved a spiffy new set of fenders and wheels, some love from Brooks, and that pukka Carradice saddlebag. I think it was more of a rescue than a restoration.

slowtostart 05-26-16 12:48 PM


Originally Posted by Roll-Monroe-Co (Post 18798784)
Does anybody make those bags? It seems simple enough.

Here's a place to start:
A DIY Longflap Saddlebag for Minimalist Bike Touring - BIKEPACKING.com

And now I'm off to retrieve the Rudge!

Mans 3 speed bike made in England

Just home.

Everything is in very good condition. It even has new tires and its Britannialloy pump. The original Brooks is a raisin, but not torn. I'll search for your renewal suggestions. Frankly, it exceeded, condition wise, all expectations. Sadly, it's a bit small for my husband. Hub date is "2 63"

erileykc 05-26-16 07:26 PM

Damn, I'd sell my Tourist at those prices. Well maybe not but one of the Ebay listings is asking close to $1200 - double what I paid for a new bike in 1980.


Originally Posted by Quebber (Post 18798803)
@DQRider, by coincidence, here is another 78 DL1 without the flash:
Vintage Raleigh Tourist 3 Speed w Rod Brakes Nottingham England | eBay


gster 05-26-16 07:43 PM


Originally Posted by slowtostart (Post 18799262)
Here's a place to start:
A DIY Longflap Saddlebag for Minimalist Bike Touring - BIKEPACKING.com

And now I'm off to retrieve the Rudge!

Mans 3 speed bike made in England

Just home.

Everything is in very good condition. It even has new tires and its Britannialloy pump. The original Brooks is a raisin, but not torn. I'll search for your renewal suggestions. Frankly, it exceeded, condition wise, all expectations. Sadly, it's a bit small for my husband. Hub date is "2 63"

I want a Rudge!

DQRider 05-26-16 07:52 PM


Originally Posted by erileykc (Post 18800195)
Damn, I'd sell my Tourist at those prices. Well maybe not but one of the Ebay listings is asking close to $1200 - double what I paid for a new bike in 1980.

Well, that's the beauty of it: unlike cars, old English 3-speeds can go through almost infinite cycles of restore, ride, maintain, and still look as good as you want them to come sale time. I plan to ride mine until I tire of it, if that ever even happens, and then spruce it up and sell it for crazy money into a market that will only get better with time.

SirMike1983 05-26-16 08:45 PM

I have two bikes with those older, vinyl bags. They look right for a 1960s-70s bike, but a little out of place on the earlier ones. The quality is so-so. The Carradice Zipper Roll in black is my favorite bag. The Banjo Brothers Barrel is a decent budget offering, though a bit smaller.

BigChief 05-26-16 08:49 PM


Originally Posted by slowtostart (Post 18799262)
Here's a place to start:
A DIY Longflap Saddlebag for Minimalist Bike Touring - BIKEPACKING.com

And now I'm off to retrieve the Rudge!

Mans 3 speed bike made in England

Just home.

Everything is in very good condition. It even has new tires and its Britannialloy pump. The original Brooks is a raisin, but not torn. I'll search for your renewal suggestions. Frankly, it exceeded, condition wise, all expectations. Sadly, it's a bit small for my husband. Hub date is "2 63"

That's a beautiful Rudge. You got a good deal too. I'm 6 foot tall and I have become accustomed to riding 21" Raleighs. I max out the stem height and adjust the seat post until I get the balance against the handlebars I like. That leaves me a bit short of leg extension, but it still works for casual riding. If you don't mind more weight on the bars, there's quite a bit of seat post to raise and even extra long seat posts. edit...There's also extra long stems that can be used.

Loose Chain 05-26-16 09:17 PM

Hope you do not blow your knees out BigChief.

I have two 23s now. One complete bike and one very nice frame and parts. I am planning to build one of them for my brother who is a little over 6 foot tall and has a rails to trails right behind his house and plenty of cycling opportunities near his house. Me, I am not quite 5-11 (my aviation medical say 5-11) but I think I have shrunk. Anyways, when I get on a 23 inch frame if I dismount that top tube is too close for comfort if you ask me. I used to look for 23s and now I look for 21s and want a 19 step through. But the 23 inch bikes I have rescued will find useful homes in due time.

I have my MB3, the Dunelt and my Guerciotto all apart in the basement shop, hope the parts do not get mixed up! Could make for a Johnny Cash song---- and then the steering of my Jeep need to be replaced, so I am kinda underwater on mechanical projects. Could end up looking like this.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...psqv0t9slm.jpg

BigChief 05-27-16 06:22 AM

Well, the operative words here are casual riding. I ride relatively flat landscapes and my speeds and distances are modest. Compared to a well set up road bike, efficiency , I'll guess, must be down by 50% on an upright 3 speed. There's no pull on the crank, my upper body muscles aren't doing anything besides holding me up and wind resistance is much higher. This is why I like them geared down a bit. Considering all that, an inch or two of leg extension doesn't amount to much. What I gain is the experience of riding with my upper body in the same position as I was walking. Except I'm not walking. I'm gliding through the countryside with the wind in my face taking in the surroundings. I really don't notice a big difference between my 21" and 23" or my 24" roadster as long as I take my rides nice and easy. If I want to get somewhere in a hurry or deal with hill climbing, I have a drop bar road bike for that.

Bandera 05-27-16 06:54 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 18798657)
@BigChief, I had good success repairing a saddlebag like that by taking it to a shoe repair shop. They made new leather strips using the old buckles and I was down the road.

Just picked up the 70's "Schwinn Approved made in England" canvas seatbag from the saddle shop where leather reinforcing patches were added to keep the dowel rod in place.
Great shop, traditional craftsmanship and worth going in just for the leather smell of the tack. :thumb:

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=523808

-Bandera

3speedslow 05-27-16 08:01 AM


Originally Posted by slowtostart (Post 18799262)
Here's a place to start:
A DIY Longflap Saddlebag for Minimalist Bike Touring - BIKEPACKING.com

And now I'm off to retrieve the Rudge!

Mans 3 speed bike made in England

Just home.

Everything is in very good condition. It even has new tires and its Britannialloy pump. The original Brooks is a raisin, but not torn. I'll search for your renewal suggestions. Frankly, it exceeded, condition wise, all expectations. Sadly, it's a bit small for my husband. Hub date is "2 63"

That's great looking Rudge! Love it when they come with the bits too. Pumps are a must for these.

BigChief 05-27-16 09:00 AM


Originally Posted by 3speedslow (Post 18801192)
That's great looking Rudge! Love it when they come with the bits too. Pumps are a must for these.

Another nice thing about this Rudge is the one bolt wrap around style brake levers like the Raleigh badged bikes always had. The other brand Raleighs usually came with levers with 2 bolt clamshell clamps. That second bolt interferes with the trigger lever and forces you to set the trigger further back on the handlebars. It also has the Raleigh style stamped fender stays which are more rigid than the plain wire stays the other brands usually got.

slowtostart 05-27-16 02:01 PM


Originally Posted by 3speedslow (Post 18801192)
That's great looking Rudge! Love it when they come with the bits too. Pumps are a must for these.

Many thanks for the kind (enabler) comments about the Rudge. It is mechanically sound and came with new, functional, tires and tubes.

The very neglected saddle is enjoying a Proofhide marinade in the sun. Brooks advertises an "aged" saddle. I have an authentic one. It was more elephant's rump than raisin before our start today. Now it has "texture".

The paint, chrome, and pin striping are in very good condition after a gentle wash and careful application of Meguiar's Scratch X to the frame. Wax to follow.

Sir M, that bag resembles a shaving kit bag with a flap, yes? Could it be rectangular rather than cylindrical?


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