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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Monzeglio 11-02-20 01:48 PM


Originally Posted by JaccoW (Post 21772138)
Excellent point, though for the UK I would suggest this eBay seller. However good the BikeSmithDesign cotter press might be. That's a $100+ tool by the time it arrives in the UK.

Thanks for the tip - I'm sure it will be worth acquiring the right tool for the job.

Salubrious 11-02-20 02:18 PM


Originally Posted by Monzeglio (Post 21772195)
Another good tip, Salubrious, thank you. Looks like a pretty simple tool - similar to a small car ball-joint separator. I can imagine it saves a lot of trouble and potential hammer damage!

Its unlikely that if you hit a cotter pin with a hammer that dmage won't be obvious! As with all tools you have to be careful with a press getting the pin out, but your chances of doing so without damage are much higher (and less chance of damaging bearings in the BB). A bit of Kroil on pesky rusted cranks usually does the trick with the press, along with careful application of torque.

Rherdegen 11-02-20 05:09 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 21772089)
To check the bottom bracket you'll need a cotter pin press to to remove the crank arms. Don't use a hammer!! The pins are re-usable, and if you have a cotter press You'll find the crank arms easier to remove and install (the nuts are only used to hold the pins in place) than alloy square taper cranks. This press works a treat:
New Crank Cotter Press

I’m embarrassed to admit that I never know such a tool existed. Thank you for the heads-up. Of course, it is rather pricey. Is there an alternative to this that doesn’t involve beating the heck out of the cotter pin, deforming it in the process, then replacing it?

albrt 11-02-20 05:46 PM


Originally Posted by Rherdegen (Post 21772530)
beating the heck out of the cotter pin, deforming it in the process, then replacing it

That is more or less the traditional method. Sheldon Brown describes an anvil made from a length of pipe, which is what I use on the relatively rare occasions when I need to remove crank cotter pins. The hammer works much better with an anvil under the crank, but you still destroy the pin sometimes. And sometimes the reason you are removing the pin is because it has become deformed creating a hitch in the crank. The pin is much more malleable than the other parts by design.

JaccoW 11-03-20 03:53 AM


Originally Posted by Rherdegen (Post 21772530)
Iím embarrassed to admit that I never know such a tool existed. Thank you for the heads-up. Of course, it is rather pricey. Is there an alternative to this that doesnít involve beating the heck out of the cotter pin, deforming it in the process, then replacing it?

Check my eBay link a little further up. ;)

And like @albrt already said, a vice with a socket wrench underneath the head of the pin is the other method.

Salubrious 11-03-20 10:36 AM


Originally Posted by Rherdegen (Post 21772530)
I’m embarrassed to admit that I never know such a tool existed. Thank you for the heads-up. Of course, it is rather pricey. Is there an alternative to this that doesn’t involve beating the heck out of the cotter pin, deforming it in the process, then replacing it?

Yes.

Unless you are comfortable finding a new cotter pin of the same shape, angle and hardness, DO NOT use a hammer no matter what. People on this thread have cobbled together a press using C-clamps and a bit of ingenuity to good effect- you'll have to search this thread. FWIW the only way the cotter pin ever gets deformed is because of improper removal. If deformed it would be very tricky to re-install!

Rherdegen 11-03-20 10:43 AM

Excellent counsel, Salubrious!

Monzeglio 11-03-20 12:03 PM

I've been offering up a G-clamp I have with a socket and I think I should be able to make a Heath Robinson attempt at pressing out the cotter pins on the Superbe's cranks. I'll let you know how I get on!

dweenk 11-03-20 12:11 PM

I would add that if you remove the cotters with no damage, label them "R" and "L". It is one little bit of insurance that your crank arms 180 degrees opposed when reinstalled.

Monzeglio 11-03-20 01:11 PM

How sensible! Iíll prepare my Sharpie.

JohnDThompson 11-04-20 09:10 AM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 21773406)
Unless you are comfortable finding a new cotter pin of the same shape, angle and hardness, DO NOT use a hammer no matter what. People on this thread have cobbled together a press using C-clamps and a bit of ingenuity to good effect- you'll have to search this thread. FWIW the only way the cotter pin ever gets deformed is because of improper removal. If deformed it would be very tricky to re-install!

Not to mention, modern cotters tend to be very poor quality compared to what used to be available. Rather than machined from rod stock, modern cotters are simply pressed into shape and tend to be undersized as a result. And the steel quality is much softer to accommodate the press operation.

https://bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/cotters.html

Monzeglio 11-04-20 10:44 AM

I was on the Superbe today and the ride has definitely improved with the headset lubed and the saddle height raised a little. Swooping through a sequence of corners it held its line very nicely and itís pulling up faster when I squeeze on the rod brakes. I can detect some modulation through the front brake though, which means the braking surface is probably Ďout of roundí over a small section - I can detect a very slight variation in the rim.
Is this common and does anyone have a suggestion of the best way to sort it out? Iím hoping it might be adjusted by a truing-type exercise.

Monzeglio 11-04-20 10:49 AM

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...289eda289.jpeg
I can now post images, so hereís the bottom race of the Ď82 Raleigh Superbeís headset with the full complement of 25 ball bearings, as recommended by Sheldon Brown. I used Park Tool grease which stuck the bearings in place nicely while I slid the fork back into the frame.

Monzeglio 11-04-20 10:55 AM

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...09e6a7213.jpeg
Hereís the Ď82 Superbe before I cleaned it up. Very original, nothing has been replaced from new as far as I can tell, including the tyres. It even has the remnants of its Ďinspectedí paper sticker on the stem. Iím already quite fond of the tartan rear carrier...

arty dave 11-04-20 04:18 PM


Originally Posted by Monzeglio (Post 21774934)
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...09e6a7213.jpeg
Hereís the Ď82 Superbe before I cleaned it up. Very original, nothing has been replaced from new as far as I can tell, including the tyres. It even has the remnants of its Ďinspectedí paper sticker on the stem. Iím already quite fond of the tartan rear carrier...

WOW! This image looks like an advertisement from the 70's.... amazing condition, great find :)

cudak888 11-04-20 05:26 PM

FYI, @Monzeglio, that particular Superbe may differ in some specifications from the typical Raleigh Sports or Superbe as is often mentioned here on the forum.

I don't know much about these - other than they're UK-market only - but they have a different (and slightly nicer) frame than the typical Sports, if a bit lacking in the traditional details one expects. The dropouts are different (I've never seen one close enough to figure out if they're the same stamped steel dropout in the fashion of the older Super Course), the lugs are generic cast (?) pieces, and the stays have spoon caps. The fenders are different than the norm as well, and the crankarms also appear different.

I've always assumed these came from Japan, but that's obviously a classic Nottingham headset. Would love to see more closeups of the details.

-Kurt

clubman 11-04-20 06:13 PM

Scandinavian market, probably Danish. I toured Denmark for a month in '93 and saw many similar models.
Downtown.
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1a53fa1d9a.jpg

cudak888 11-04-20 07:02 PM

I'm liking the light blue thing to the left. It's not lugged, but it has a good look.

-Kurt

clubman 11-04-20 08:52 PM

You're a sucker for precious, shiny objects Kurt. ;)
Agree.

bluesteak 11-05-20 06:54 PM

Mongrel Lenton
 
I am posting pictures of the crankset cleaned up. Does anyone have any idea about it. It seems like it was made by Williams. It has Williams chainring square head bolts. It is designed for 1/8th chain.
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3c67bf888.jpeg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...825c92961.jpeg

JaccoW 11-06-20 10:10 AM

Anybody in need of a really big frame? :P

Originally Posted by JaccoW (Post 21777859)

EMPO 3-speed bike - Big frame (75cm / 29 inches) €295 in The Hague, the Netherlands

Marktplaats

http://i.imgur.com/KtUWupw.jpg


Ballenxj 11-06-20 04:29 PM


Originally Posted by JaccoW (Post 21777863)
Anybody in need of a really big frame? :P

WOW! I'm thinking that Bike weighs close to double what a standard one might.

clubman 11-06-20 05:05 PM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21777087)
I am posting pictures of the crankset cleaned up. Does anyone have any idea about it. It seems like it was made by Williams. It has Williams chainring square head bolts. It is designed for 1/8th chain.

Williams would have a date code but perhaps they made them for Raleigh without. Nicklin also made cranks for Raleigh. Mid 50's Lenton cranks were fluted and usually didn't have the heron motif. Like this

bluesteak 11-06-20 06:16 PM

Is the ďPĒ on the inside of left crankarm a date code?

clubman 11-06-20 07:13 PM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21778547)
Is the ďPĒ on the inside of left crankarm a date code?

It's possible but Williams usually dated both crankarms and rings. P is a valid date code for 1930.

Rherdegen 11-07-20 01:30 PM

Tube information and recommendation
 
Once again, I come to members of this forum for help and advice. Iím in the final steps of a refurb of my Ď51 Raleigh Superbe Sports Touring, a bike which hasnít seen the light of day in probably 30 years, and which Iíve had in pieces for pretty much that whole time. My plan was to put on new tubes and tires due to age of ones it came with. And I figured I could just use new tubes with Schraeder valves instead of the old tubes with a woods/Dunlop valves as I believed other people had done in similar refurb projects. No dice. The holes in the old rims are just a bit too small to accommodate the Schraeder valves on the domestic tubes I bought. So...is there a brand of domestic US tube with a Schraeder valve that is small enough to get through the hole in the rim of a Ď51 Raleigh? Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and get tubes with Woods valves? And if the latter, does anyone have a recommended domestic source of tubes with Woods valves, or do I need to get them from an overseas source (and pay a bunch extra for shipping)? My main reason for wanting the Schraeder valve tubes is that everything else I own (well, almost everything) has Schraeder, and a domestic source really for speed of getting them and saving on shipping.

Oh, and it is a 26 x 1 3/8Ē tube/tire.

Iím grateful for any advice you have!

bluesteak 11-07-20 01:33 PM

Mongrel lenton
 
I couldnít access your link but 1930 seems to old. The mounting holes in the chain ring are on 4Ē centers. I have seen similar herons on double chain ring cranks from around 1960. I will attach a couple more photos. Who made them and when may remain a mystery.
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...61bdf195e.jpeg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e0e5a2429.jpeg

gster 11-08-20 06:09 AM


Originally Posted by Rherdegen (Post 21779480)
Once again, I come to members of this forum for help and advice. Iím in the final steps of a refurb of my Ď51 Raleigh Superbe Sports Touring, a bike which hasnít seen the light of day in probably 30 years, and which Iíve had in pieces for pretty much that whole time. My plan was to put on new tubes and tires due to age of ones it came with. And I figured I could just use new tubes with Schraeder valves instead of the old tubes with a woods/Dunlop valves as I believed other people had done in similar refurb projects. No dice. The holes in the old rims are just a bit too small to accommodate the Schraeder valves on the domestic tubes I bought. So...is there a brand of domestic US tube with a Schraeder valve that is small enough to get through the hole in the rim of a Ď51 Raleigh? Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and get tubes with Woods valves? And if the latter, does anyone have a recommended domestic source of tubes with Woods valves, or do I need to get them from an overseas source (and pay a bunch extra for shipping)? My main reason for wanting the Schraeder valve tubes is that everything else I own (well, almost everything) has Schraeder, and a domestic source really for speed of getting them and saving on shipping.

Oh, and it is a 26 x 1 3/8Ē tube/tire.

Iím grateful for any advice you have!

I've encountered some tight fitting valves but have always been able to pull it through.
Can you not just ream out the hole on the rim a bit?

Ballenxj 11-08-20 09:02 AM


Originally Posted by Rherdegen (Post 21779480)
Once again, I come to members of this forum for help and advice. I’m in the final steps of a refurb of my ‘51 Raleigh Superbe Sports Touring, a bike which hasn’t seen the light of day in probably 30 years, and which I’ve had in pieces for pretty much that whole time. My plan was to put on new tubes and tires due to age of ones it came with. And I figured I could just use new tubes with Schraeder valves instead of the old tubes with a woods/Dunlop valves as I believed other people had done in similar refurb projects. No dice. The holes in the old rims are just a bit too small to accommodate the Schraeder valves on the domestic tubes I bought. So...is there a brand of domestic US tube with a Schraeder valve that is small enough to get through the hole in the rim of a ‘51 Raleigh? Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and get tubes with Woods valves? And if the latter, does anyone have a recommended domestic source of tubes with Woods valves, or do I need to get them from an overseas source (and pay a bunch extra for shipping)? My main reason for wanting the Schraeder valve tubes is that everything else I own (well, almost everything) has Schraeder, and a domestic source really for speed of getting them and saving on shipping.

Oh, and it is a 26 x 1 3/8” tube/tire.

I’m grateful for any advice you have!

If you wish to convert to Schrader valves, a 21/64th drill bit and a drill motor will get the job done. I have done the Presta to Schrader conversion more than a few times on other Bicycles with good results.
Just be sure to deburr the holes after. ;)

jamesdak 11-08-20 09:23 AM

I'm feeling the lack of love for my three speed, LOL! After years I finally had to admit it's just too small for me. Found a replacement bike for it and posted it locally. Down to asking a give away price and still no love for it. I got a feeling it's going to wind up as a donation to the bike coop. :ride:

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4f3d37fa37.jpg
Rough old girl but she get's the job done.


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