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bampilot06 08-31-22 06:20 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22631490)
Except that sedentary people tend to have higher HR. Apparently "normal" resting HR is 60-100 bpm.

SO! Let's take a sedentary person. Their HR of 60-100 yields 86,400 - 144,000 beats per day.

Now, let's posit somebody fitter. This person has a RHR of 45, and they do 1 1/2 hours of exercise with an average HR of 120. So, in the 22 1/2 hours they aren't exercising, their heart beats 60,750 times. In the 1 1/2 hours they exercise, it beats 10,800.

Add those two together, and you get 71,550 beats a day - at least 14,850 FEWER beats than the sedentary individual. Roughly every 6 days, they'd gain an extra day of longevity over the sedentary person.

SO, EVEN IF it were true that there's a maximum number of beats, you'd use them up quicker if you never exercised.


You need a hobby.

big john 08-31-22 06:26 PM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22631598)
You need a hobby.

I think that is one of his hobbies.

Trsnrtr 08-31-22 06:27 PM

I went to my family doc a couple weeks ago and the med tech put a finger cuff on me and got 40 bpm. She didn’t believe it and took a wrist pulse count and got 42. She saw that I had an Apple Watch and asked what it was reporting. It was also 42.

The doc which is I’ve only had a short time, takes my pulse at the wrist and gets 42. He also asked me about my watch and I told him it was also 42.

He continues the exam checking things and listens to my hearts and lungs like always and then I leave. I get home and I’m reading the after visit report it says 56 bpm. :foo:

big john 08-31-22 06:31 PM

Went out to get the mail. Oppressive heat. Been a while since I've been in 110. Also could smell the brush fire north of here where they are evacuating.

Little window a/c is struggling to keep going. Couple times the compressor kicked off, maybe the pressure got too high. At the old house when it got this hot it would trip the circuit breaker because the head pressure was so high. I put a pedestal fan outside blowing on the condenser and it worked.

bampilot06 08-31-22 06:35 PM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22631606)
I went to my family doc a couple weeks ago and the med tech put a finger cuff on me and got 40 bpm. She didnít believe it and took a wrist pulse count and got 42. She saw that I had an Apple Watch and asked what it was reporting. It was also 42.

The doc which is Iíve only had a short time, takes my pulse at the wrist and gets 42. He also asked me about my watch and I told him it was also 42.

He continues the exam checking things and listens to my hearts and lungs like always and then I leave. I get home and Iím reading the after visit report it says 56 bpm. :foo:


mine is usually at 48-52 resting.

Mojo31 08-31-22 07:03 PM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22631566)
A cycling riend of mine had bypass surgery about 5 years ago and recently had knee replacement. He's like 69. Anyway, he had to have his cardiologist sign off before this knee surgery and the doc said that he had had another heart attack at some point. No idea when.

Mine does the opposite - white coat syndrome.

genejockey 08-31-22 08:09 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22631604)
I think that is one of his hobbies.

If my brain didn't work strangely, I'd have to do something else for a living.

LesterOfPuppets 08-31-22 11:52 PM

P&FAOTD

https://scontent.fphx1-1.fna.fbcdn.n...pg&oe=63149044

MoAlpha 09-01-22 06:12 AM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22631566)
A cycling riend of mine had bypass surgery about 5 years ago and recently had knee replacement. He's like 69. Anyway, he had to have his cardiologist sign off before this knee surgery and the doc said that he had had another heart attack at some point. No idea when.

Here's how I see it: All of us probably have coronary artery disease, so the baseline risk of heart attack is significantly > zero and generally increasing over time. However, very few of us have a critical narrowing or a hot plaque that might take us out this month. People in that category (many or most of whom have symptoms with exertion) should be medicated and under close supervision and have no business riding a bike at any effort level until they're good and stable. That's an acute condition, not something you expect or screen for in random old duffers. For your unfortunate guy, yeah, he's got bad disease and is at higher risk across the board, but he knew that five years ago and is presumably getting the close follow-up he needs.

An EKG never hurts and I even think an echocardiogram might be worth doing in lifelong competitive athletes. There just seems to be a lot of apparently healthy people and casual riders who have rolled Afib, deadly arrhythmias, and heart attacks into a unitary bogey man who will devour them if they stray over some imaginary redline on the HRM.

Maybe @datlas can correct some of this.

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 06:32 AM

Wordle 439 5/6
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🟨🟩⬜⬜⬜
⬜🟩🟨🟨🟨
🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩

datlas 09-01-22 06:37 AM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22632027)
Here's how I see it: All of us probably have coronary artery disease, so the baseline risk of heart attack is significantly > zero and generally increasing over time. However, very few of us have a critical narrowing or a hot plaque that might take us out this month. People in that category (many or most of whom have symptoms with exertion) should be medicated and under close supervision and have no business riding a bike at any effort level until they're good and stable. That's an acute condition, not something you expect or screen for in random old duffers. For your unfortunate guy, yeah, he's got bad disease and is at higher risk across the board, but he knew that five years ago and is presumably getting the close follow-up he needs.

An EKG never hurts and I even think an echocardiogram might be worth doing in lifelong competitive athletes. There just seems to be a lot of apparently healthy people and casual riders who have rolled Afib, deadly arrhythmias, and heart attacks into a unitary bogey man who will devour them if they stray over some imaginary redline on the HRM.

Maybe @datlas can correct some of this.

Need more info. Lots of people have q waves on their ekg which is typically interpreted as "past heart attack" which is sometimes true and sometimes not true. That said, rarely, patients can have silent ischemia and have a true heart attack without even knowing it. That's uncommon but possible. Like most medical questions/concerns, it gets complicated quickly and details are important.

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 06:45 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22631409)
That's too complex. This is just to test the hypothesis, favored by a certain former President, that there is a maximum number of times your heart can beat before you die, notwithstanding any other potential causes of death. This would just look at the total number of heart beats before death for anyone who didn't die of something else, like cancer, or a stroke, or a bus, to name a few options.

If you just call it destiny, you don't have to factor any of that other stuff in.

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 06:53 AM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22631494)
You may be on to something.

I listened to a podcast last night, where she postulated that skeletal muscle health is the predictor of longevity. And as such, lots of daily protein. A gram per pound of body weight.
And fasting. At least 24 hours once a month.

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 07:02 AM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22631606)
I went to my family doc a couple weeks ago and the med tech put a finger cuff on me and got 40 bpm. She didnít believe it and took a wrist pulse count and got 42. She saw that I had an Apple Watch and asked what it was reporting. It was also 42.

The doc which is Iíve only had a short time, takes my pulse at the wrist and gets 42. He also asked me about my watch and I told him it was also 42.

He continues the exam checking things and listens to my hearts and lungs like always and then I leave. I get home and Iím reading the after visit report it says 56 bpm. :foo:

My doc gives me 80, while my cardiologist gives me 58. I'm 70, and 80 is normal for a 70 year old.

datlas 09-01-22 07:02 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22632067)
I listened to a podcast last night, where she postulated that skeletal muscle health is the predictor of longevity. And as such, lots of daily protein. A gram per pound of body weight.

I am not really sure higher dietary protein causes increased skeletal muscle. It's probably exercise not diet.

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 07:03 AM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22631606)
I went to my family doc a couple weeks ago and the med tech put a finger cuff on me and got 40 bpm. She didnít believe it and took a wrist pulse count and got 42. She saw that I had an Apple Watch and asked what it was reporting. It was also 42.

The doc which is Iíve only had a short time, takes my pulse at the wrist and gets 42. He also asked me about my watch and I told him it was also 42.

He continues the exam checking things and listens to my hearts and lungs like always and then I leave. I get home and Iím reading the after visit report it says 56 bpm. :foo:

My doc gives me 80, while my cardiologist gives me 58. I'm 70, and 80 is normal for a 70 year old.

Mojo31 09-01-22 07:11 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22632082)
My doc gives me 80, while my cardiologist gives me 58. I'm 70, and 80 is normal for a 70 year old.


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22632088)
My doc gives me 80, while my cardiologist gives me 58. I'm 70, and 80 is normal for a 70 year old.

And, dementia seems to be settling in. ;)

MoAlpha 09-01-22 07:20 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22632067)
I listened to a podcast last night, where she postulated that skeletal muscle health is the predictor of longevity. And as such, lots of daily protein. A gram per pound of body weight.
And fasting. At least 24 hours once a month.

Correct! Lean muscle mass is a major negative predictor of all-cause mortality in the elderly. Protein absorption declines with age, so old people need to eat a huge amount to maintain muscle. A gram per pound sounds about right. It doesn't work without resistance exercise, though. Don't skip leg day!

MoAlpha 09-01-22 07:23 AM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22632083)
I am not really sure higher dietary protein causes increased skeletal muscle. It's probably exercise not diet.

The mTOR pathway detects amino acid availability and regulates muscle growth and catabolism in response, but you're right, exercise is essential.

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 09:50 AM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22632083)
I am not really sure higher dietary protein causes increased skeletal muscle. It's probably exercise not diet.

More protein begets more, and more strenuous exercise.

WhyFi 09-01-22 09:54 AM

I forgot my HRM on the ride this morning and had one of my better off-day, TT-ish rides yet. I guess that it's sometimes easier when you can't see how much you're suffering :p

seedsbelize2 09-01-22 09:55 AM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22632102)
And, dementia seems to be settling in. ;)

I was struggling with an internet connection. The site took so long to respond that I was directed to the page that says I can't post twice in 30 seconds. On my device it didn't even post once, that I could see anyway. At other times, with a weak signal, When I type bikeforums.net into the search bar, I'm directed to Internet Brands privacy policy.

WhyFi 09-01-22 09:57 AM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22632356)
I forgot my HRM on the ride this morning and had one of my better off-day, TT-ish rides yet. I guess that it's sometimes easier when you can't see how much you're suffering :p

Speaking of HRs, y'all are a bunch of high-revvers. I have to really punish myself to get over 170.

datlas 09-01-22 10:09 AM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22632363)
Speaking of HRs, y'all are a bunch of high-revvers. I have to really punish myself to get over 170.

I have not used a HRM for about 5 years, but last time I checked, I could peg the meter at about 190. It's probably come down a few since then, but I am not really interested in such things.

Mojo31 09-01-22 10:59 AM

I don't see HRs over 150, ever. But, I take a calcium channel blocker which may have an impact on that. I really struggled for a couple of months after my dosage was doubled, but I seem to be getting back to where I was before that.


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