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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

1989Pre 03-07-23 11:39 AM


Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 22822007)
There are 3 options:
1. Pre-emptory sealant... the way tubeless tire riders do it. Statistically works pretty well but you never know if you would've flatted or not without it unless you pull out a goat head or something and watch it work... so most people pack a spare tire anyway. With smaller road tires though, you might lose enough air before the plug happens that you have to press the tire up again even if the sealant does work.
2. Repair sealant... keep a bottle in your pocket and after you flat on the road, inject the sealant and hope it works. It reportedly does work often enough that people find it worth trying... not well enough that people don't pack a spare tire also. Before sealants got as good as they are now, people would sometimes bring something like Vittoria Pitt Stop that had sealant and pressurized air in the same can... I estimate that has about a 50% chance of working.
3. Both

Summary: if you have a flat on the road and you're not in a hurry and you want to avoid swapping on your spare and throwing away the flatted one... worth a shot to try and seal it in place.
You need a spare anyway because some flats are absolutely unsealable, and success with the easier punctures isn't guaranteed.

Extremely valuable information for me., Thanks. Primarily because I do not carry a cell-phone and I might be walking back home 30 miles in vintage cycling shoes, although the people around here are really nice and will usually collect any cyclist in trouble. I can't take any chances: I'm bringing an extra and leaving this bottle at home.

1989Pre 03-07-23 11:48 AM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 22820700)
I also use their glue or mastic remover, when cleaning old, glue laden rims, back to their original condition.

Thanks for mentioning this. Is this something I can use to get the glue off of the side-wall of the tire as well as the rim?

Positron400 03-07-23 01:51 PM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22822024)
Extremely valuable information for me., Thanks. Primarily because I do not carry a cell-phone and I might be walking back home 30 miles in vintage cycling shoes, although the people around here are really nice and will usually collect any cyclist in trouble. I can't take any chances: I'm bringing an extra and leaving this bottle at home.

I have no experience with carrying a pre-glued tub, but i recon tape would be an easier road-side fix?

1989Pre 03-07-23 03:31 PM


Originally Posted by Positron400 (Post 22822194)
I have no experience with carrying a pre-glued tub, but i recon tape would be an easier road-side fix?

"Pre-glued"?! I was hoping I could just put the spare on there and use the glue that was already on the rim. Maybe not. Maybe put glue on the tire when and where you puncture?

CV-6 03-07-23 05:02 PM


Originally Posted by Positron400 (Post 22822194)
I have no experience with carrying a pre-glued tub, but i recon tape would be an easier road-side fix?


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22822307)
"Pre-glued"?! I was hoping I could just put the spare on there and use the glue that was already on the rim. Maybe not. Maybe put glue on the tire when and where you puncture?

An unglued tire might hold okay. Putting glue on at the time is an iffy proposition. Easier to pre-glue a tire and then you have a better chance on holding and spend less time at the side of the road.

For tape...IME some of the tape may stick to the tire, some to the rim, or all on the tire. Never had one that all the tape stuck to the rim. I carry a small piece of stiff sheet plastic with tape wrapped on it to use on the road. Also have a small sharp knife to cut tape as needed.

seedsbelize2 03-07-23 07:07 PM


Originally Posted by Positron400 (Post 22821834)
Yes you do. The latex compound with the particles clogs up any would-be-punctures and only minimal air should escape.
Regarding the valve core, that is up to you really. If you remove the valve core, all the air will be let out anyways. So you can either deflate it beforehand, or just remove the valve core right away.
I think the amount of sealant is also dependent on the size of the tire. Stan's might have a reccomendation, but imma say go with 40 mL (since i presume you run a 25 mm tire at most)

Removing the valve core, with pressure in the tire, significantly increases the chances of that core flying off into Never-Never land

seedsbelize2 03-07-23 07:13 PM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22822024)
Extremely valuable information for me., Thanks. Primarily because I do not carry a cell-phone and I might be walking back home 30 miles in vintage cycling shoes, although the people around here are really nice and will usually collect any cyclist in trouble. I can't take any chances: I'm bringing an extra and leaving this bottle at home.

IIRC, Drillium Dude can speak to this phenomenon

seedsbelize2 03-07-23 07:17 PM


Originally Posted by CV-6 (Post 22822403)
An unglued tire might hold okay. Putting glue on at the time is an iffy proposition. Easier to pre-glue a tire and then you have a better chance on holding and spend less time at the side of the road.

For tape...IME some of the tape may stick to the tire, some to the rim, or all on the tire. Never had one that all the tape stuck to the rim. I carry a small piece of stiff sheet plastic with tape wrapped on it to use on the road. Also have a small sharp knife to cut tape as needed.

Look this up (1989Pre). The tire is glued, allowed to dry, and then folded in such a way that it won't stick to itself

pastorbobnlnh 03-07-23 09:21 PM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22822038)
Thanks for mentioning this. Is this something I can use to get the glue off of the side-wall of the tire as well as the rim?

The rim, definitely. The side-wall, my guess would be, yes. However, I've never had to use it this way. It is very VOC friendly, and barely has a smell that I notice. Also, Mrs. PB never complains when I use it in the garage. It would be worth the try.

1989Pre 03-08-23 06:37 AM


Originally Posted by CV-6 (Post 22822403)
Easier to pre-glue a tire and then you have a better chance on holding and spend less time at the side of the road.

How does one carry a pre-glued tire without reducing the glue's effectiveness and/or making a mess?

1989Pre 03-08-23 06:38 AM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 22822614)
The rim, definitely. The side-wall, my guess would be, yes. However, I've never had to use it this way. It is very VOC friendly, and barely has a smell that I notice. Also, Mrs. PB never complains when I use it in the garage. It would be worth the try.

I didn't get much glue on the brake-track of the rim(s). The side-walls of the tires is another story.

EVlove 03-08-23 07:42 AM

Back to this post from a week ago--unfortunately Velosaloon informed me that they can't ship Conti cement to the US because USPS bans flammable items in the mail. They refunded that portion of my payment. Fair enough.

What's not cool is that I put in the order on Tuesday 2/28 but didn't hear back, except for the automated confirmation email, until I enquired by email a week later about the status of my shipment. So today I get a response that the package, minus the can of glue, supposedly went out on Friday 3/3, but the refund didn't happen until today. This is seriously backwards. I can live with their system not flagging the cement as not shippable to the US from the start, but then I need to be informed, and my money refunded, as soon as they do notice. I've made it clear that I'm not a happy customer. In German :notamused:

CV-6 03-08-23 09:42 AM


Originally Posted by 1989Pre (Post 22822804)
How does one carry a pre-glued tire without reducing the glue's effectiveness and/or making a mess?

Best method I have found courtesy Diablo Scott

SwimmerMike 03-08-23 10:22 AM


Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 22822007)
There are 3 options:
1. Pre-emptory sealant... the way tubeless tire riders do it. Statistically works pretty well but you never know if you would've flatted or not without it unless you pull out a goat head or something and watch it work... so most people pack a spare tire anyway. With smaller road tires though, you might lose enough air before the plug happens that you have to press the tire up again even if the sealant does work.
2. Repair sealant... keep a bottle in your pocket and after you flat on the road, inject the sealant and hope it works. It reportedly does work often enough that people find it worth trying... not well enough that people don't pack a spare tire also. Before sealants got as good as they are now, people would sometimes bring something like Vittoria Pitt Stop that had sealant and pressurized air in the same can... I estimate that has about a 50% chance of working.
3. Both

Summary: if you have a flat on the road and you're not in a hurry and you want to avoid swapping on your spare and throwing away the flatted one... worth a shot to try and seal it in place.
You need a spare anyway because some flats are absolutely unsealable, and success with the easier punctures isn't guaranteed.

I use option 2.

My rule of thumb is that if I didn't have an immediate pressure loss (think large hole), I will apply sealant, inflate and go. I've learned the hard way (repeatedly) that adding sealant when there is a big hole is a recipe for mess, so I just put on my spare.

EVlove 03-08-23 10:30 AM

So, back to square one in my quest for glue. To recap, I snagged a pair of Sprinter Gatorskins when they were briefly priced at $17 ea. or whatever it was, and they're going on the bike I'm building to try track riding/racing up in Londonderry, NH. It's a bumpy old outdoor track with wide, modestly banked turns, and I'm a spaghetti-legged almost 56 year old who's never done any racing before. Still, I would prefer glue over tape just for the peace of mind on a hot summer race day.

I guess for just these two tires, 2x25g Continental in tubes would do? Those are still easily found here in the US, looks like around $16 shipped give or take. Or does anybody have experience with Specialized? $28.99 for 120g, shipped.

ETA link: https://www.specialized.com/us/en/tu...Text=0332-0100
https://assets.specialized.com/i/spe...h=900&fmt=auto


Derived from the most used and proven European recipe that has carried rubber on wheels for the Pro Peloton for decades.
That sounds an awful lot like Continental, doesn't it? And says Made in Germany on the can. Same formula for carbon and alu, though.

I searched the thread but only found Specialized tires, not glue. Looks like last year around this time they were selling off track tires at $29 each, dang.

EVlove 03-08-23 10:57 AM

Might as well add that Specialized only has three tubular tires left in their line-up, two of which are on sale for $75 instead of $100. Looks to me like they're getting out of the segment.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sh...r:type:Tubular

1989Pre 03-08-23 12:42 PM


Originally Posted by EVlove (Post 22823125)
Might as well add that Specialized only has three tubular tires left in their line-up, two of which are on sale for $75 instead of $100. Looks to me like they're getting out of the segment.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sh...r:type:Tubular

Bontrager just bailed recently, too.

CV-6 03-08-23 01:20 PM


Originally Posted by EVlove (Post 22823125)
Might as well add that Specialized only has three tubular tires left in their line-up, two of which are on sale for $75 instead of $100. Looks to me like they're getting out of the segment.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sh...r:type:Tubular

The Hell of the North is a great tire. I also like the clincher version.

DiabloScott 03-08-23 01:41 PM


Originally Posted by CV-6 (Post 22823008)

My objective of having the internet's #1 tutorial resource for folding spare sew-ups gains momentum whenever someone links to it. :thumb:
But the full version is HERE ... created 25 years ago!

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...26a85db1b2.jpg



Originally Posted by Positron400 (Post 22822194)
I have no experience with carrying a pre-glued tub, but i recon tape would be an easier road-side fix?

Definitely not - changing a tubular with a pre-glued spare is fairly quick and easy - weather conditions can complicate it somewhat just like any other roadside repair.
Bringing a roll of tubular glue-tape along on every ride seems ridiculous.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...92d12f38d5.jpg
Other bike riders see this and are either completely baffled, or immediately recognize sew-up tifoso.



The Hell of the North is a great tire
I bought a pair of these last year but they're still unused because I love my Vittoria Pave's and they just won't wear out.

squirtdad 03-08-23 03:08 PM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22822501)
Removing the valve core, with pressure in the tire, significantly increases the chances of that core flying off into Never-Never land

Been there, done that, nearly lost an eye

pastorbobnlnh 03-08-23 04:00 PM


Originally Posted by CV-6 (Post 22823008)

I'm using Diablo's tubular folding method and combining it with my latest leather bag creation. Final stitching should take place this evening. Look for pictures later this week.

Classtime 03-08-23 05:38 PM

I don't like to fold the tire with the tape against tape on pre-glued tires because it puts too much stress on the base tape when I separate it.

CV-6 03-08-23 06:36 PM


Originally Posted by Classtime (Post 22823509)
I don't like to fold the tire with the tape against tape on pre-glued tires because it puts too much stress on the base tape when I separate it.

Get around that concern by using fingers or similar to spread it apart. Don't try to pull it apart.

seedsbelize2 03-08-23 06:41 PM


Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 22823310)
My objective of having the internet's #1 tutorial resource for folding spare sew-ups gains momentum whenever someone links to it. :thumb:
But the full version is HERE ... created 25 years ago!

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...26a85db1b2.jpg



Definitely not - changing a tubular with a pre-glued spare is fairly quick and easy - weather conditions can complicate it somewhat just like any other roadside repair.
Bringing a roll of tubular glue-tape along on every ride seems ridiculous.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...92d12f38d5.jpg
Other bike riders see this and are either completely baffled, or immediately recognize sew-up tifoso.



I bought a pair of these last year but they're still unused because I love my Vittoria Pave's and they just won't wear out.

I can imagine. The Open Pave is hands down my favorite clincher tire.

79pmooney 03-08-23 08:36 PM

[QUOTE=DiabloScott;22822007]There are 3 options:
1. Pre-emptory sealant... the way tubeless tire riders do it. Statistically works pretty well but you never know if you would've flatted or not without it unless you pull out a goat head or something and watch it work... so most people pack a spare tire anyway. With smaller road tires though, you might lose enough air before the plug happens that you have to press the tire up again even if the sealant does work.
2. Repair sealant... keep a bottle in your pocket and after you flat on the road, inject the sealant and hope it works. It reportedly does work often enough that people find it worth trying... not well enough that people don't pack a spare tire also. Before sealants got as good as they are now, people would sometimes bring something like Vittoria Pitt Stop that had sealant and pressurized air in the same can... I estimate that has about a 50% chance of working.
3. Both

Summary: if you have a flat on the road and you're not in a hurry and you want to avoid swapping on your spare and throwing away the flatted one... worth a shot to try and seal it in place.
You need a spare anyway because some flats are absolutely unsealable, and success with the easier punctures isn't guaranteed.[/QUOTE]

And it's a very good bet no one is going to happen to be carrying a spare. And sadly, there's no way to get a clincher of any sort on to get you home. (Unlike the reverse. If we carry a spare, anyone with a 700c wheel can roll home on it.) Now, 50 years ago it might have been a long wait for another rider but he probably had a spare.


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