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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

nlerner 12-03-20 09:38 AM

Beautiful bike, Peter!

BFisher 12-03-20 09:57 AM

That is fantastic. Put a smile on my face for sure.

gster 12-03-20 01:55 PM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 21816405)
UPDATE 3rd December 2020

I invited Frank to visit and see his bike now it was finished. He was over the moon to see it looking so good.
I am pleased to say we have become friends.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...877277ba6e.jpg
This is Frank with the restored bike he bought new in 1947 and handed it on to me as he had stopped riding.

A very nice tribute.
I've got my eye on a similar bike down the street, original owner bought the bike in 1956 and
had a Cyclo derailleur fitted.
He's not quite ready to part with it yet....

PeterLYoung 12-03-20 02:36 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21816824)
A very nice tribute.
I've got my eye on a similar bike down the street, original owner bought the bike in 1956 and
had a Cyclo derailleur fitted.
He's not quite ready to part with it yet....

Gster: Thanks your comment, I think it works for both parties when the time comes, I get a bike to restore/conserve and he gets to see his bike rejuvenated rather than being thrown in a skip. I would like to think my old bikes will find good homes when I shuffle off this Earth. Frank keeps digging around and giving me tit bits about his past adventures with the bike. I am producing a write up to go in the Veteran Cycle Club Magazine and Frank is checking it and verifying facts for me, I think he is loving it and we have become friends. He knows I won't be selling it for a quick profit as he knows I have spent more than it will ever be worth. Hope yours works out the same way!!!
Regards.

Johno59 12-03-20 02:54 PM

Snap.crackle,pop.
 

Originally Posted by cudak888 (Post 21815084)
I'd actually say the frames are quite different. Thinner tubing, different lugs, brazing isn't as good as the '50s model, no oiling port on the BB, no chaincase braze-on. By 1978, even the rear brake bridge became a stamped steel Pletscher part, and the pump pegs were deleted. But regardless of variant, they're almost identical in regards to what you can hang off of them (though the '78+ models finally increased the dropouts to 10mm).

The crankset, BB, headset, handlebar and handlebar stem, by comparison, are pretty similar. Same for the Westrick rims from the 1970's - they're impressively strong, galvanized spokes or otherwise. On the other hand, the Endricks from the late 1960's (Sports S22 and secondary brand bikes) are a perfect example of Raleigh cheapening out.

-Kurt

When I've stripped down every last bolt, nut, washer, bearing, cup, post spoke, nipple, cables,calipers etc from a 1930s, 40s, 50, 60ish bike you are left with say 150 different bits and 95% are reusable after you dremel wire brush them - with the possible exception of chrome plated rims and the leather furniture. When you do the same on a 70s, 80s bike that's been neglected I'd say half the bits are a write - off. Many bits snap off in the frame or need a blowtorch to remove and/or other time-consuming remedies. Perhaps folks back in the day regularly removed ever single component and regreased them and in the 1970s, 80s, 90s they didn't and hence the lop-sided destruction. But in my experience the difference it is as plain as night and day. Sure Al and steel are a stupid combination but they all still do it.
OTOH I've removed BBs that haven't been serviced for 70 years! On my 1903 Sunbeam the little fill up caps for all the headset bearings have a tiny 1/16th threaded bolt holding them in place, the epicyclic gears have 150 3/32 inch ball bearings in the BB. All came apart with no problems - even the seat-post, and all dutifully went back in.
On my modern bikes after a year I sweat on moving anything made of Al after just a year since the last service.
Folks may say you're supposed to throw things away after say five years and get a new one. Sure I understand that and built-in redundancy played a huge part in many industries across the West. For a time it created well-paid jobs for tens of millions of workers. And we all know how that ended up.

gster 12-03-20 03:03 PM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 21816880)
Gster: Thanks your comment, I think it works for both parties when the time comes, I get a bike to restore/conserve and he gets to see his bike rejuvenated rather than being thrown in a skip. I would like to think my old bikes will find good homes when I shuffle off this Earth. Frank keeps digging around and giving me tit bits about his past adventures with the bike. I am producing a write up to go in the Veteran Cycle Club Magazine and Frank is checking it and verifying facts for me, I think he is loving it and we have become friends. He knows I won't be selling it for a quick profit as he knows I have spent more than it will ever be worth. Hope yours works out the same way!!!
Regards.

It's always amazing to think that the things we create will, in most cases, outlast us.....
My wife's already planning a giant garage (boot) sale when I'm gone.

noglider 12-03-20 03:23 PM

[MENTION=266503]JaccoW[/MENTION], that Gazelle is gorgeous. The idea of rod-operated drum brakes is great if long term reliability is key and weight is not. We see very few setups like that here in the US.

PeterLYoung 12-03-20 04:17 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21816928)
It's always amazing to think that the things we create will, in most cases, outlast us.....
My wife's already planning a giant garage (boot) sale when I'm gone.

Same here, but she has to outlive me first 😆

JaccoW 12-03-20 05:41 PM


Originally Posted by Rherdegen (Post 21704350)
From what I’ve read and seen (and admittedly not a really comprehensive or authoritative knowledge base) the bullet or torpedo grips were from ‘60’s or ‘70’s. I’ve looked and looked, and can’t really find anything that matches the original grips from early ‘50’s Raleighs. For my circumstances, I’ll probably do the bullet grips for now (‘cause that’s what I have) and keep looking for something that comes closer to appearance of originals.

Something like this? It's probably worth it to keep an eye on this store. They get some really cool rare stuff in stock from time to time.

cudak888 12-03-20 05:49 PM


Originally Posted by Johno59 (Post 21816913)
When I've stripped down every last bolt, nut, washer, bearing, cup, post spoke, nipple, cables,calipers etc from a 1930s, 40s, 50, 60ish bike you are left with say 150 different bits and 95% are reusable after you dremel wire brush them - with the possible exception of chrome plated rims and the leather furniture. When you do the same on a 70s, 80s bike that's been neglected I'd say half the bits are a write - off. Many bits snap off in the frame or need a blowtorch to remove and/or other time-consuming remedies.

The '70s Raleighs aren't too bad in that respect - unless they're really thrashed - but I agree that zinc plated parts were the beginning of the end. The parts on the 1950's bikes are almost all chromium plated - and if not thick chrome, a dull silvery finish that barely dulls (which I think is chrome as well).

That's one of the reasons I'm always impressed by bike share bikes. Stainless steel fittings throughout, exceptional - if heavy - components, and the same approach to quality as the pre-1960's machines.

-Kurt

gster 12-03-20 10:20 PM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 21817040)
Same here, but she has to outlive me first 😆

Yes.
I often find her hovering over my side of the bed with a pillow......

gster 12-04-20 08:17 AM

Triumph!
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...c8cc52886f.jpg
Listed here in Toronto as a mid 50's Triumph.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...be1ef65451.jpg
Looks to be complete and in reasonable restorable shape.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...7dd2be49cd.jpg
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...bb335ca9ac.jpg
The decals look good.
There's only one big problem..
Seller is asking $250.00

barnfind 12-04-20 08:44 AM

I had a guy a couple of weeks ago bring me a pair of wheels off one of those AMF/Hercules bikes to get the rims swapped over. He found two brand new Sturmey Archer Endrick rims and had them shipped in. He was adamant about using only original spokes and components, he didn't want new spokes or new nipples but brought me a bucket of used nipples and spokes he salvaged out of other bikes. The hub, which I also went through was dated 10 - 72.
I saw no difference in the spokes or nipples from the earlier bikes, I've got several from the 50's up to the late 70's out in the trailer.
On the newer 'Sports' models, whether its a Raleigh, Hercules, or other English brand, there really isn't any aluminum bits to worry about other than maybe the occasional aluminum kickstand. They did switch to bright chrome somewhere around the mid to late 60's, there's a definite difference to the look of the bright work but from what I've seen, the older rims get bad brake wear, and the newer rims get rusty and pit easier.
Other than that I don't see many big changes in the newer bikes. My biggest complaint on most is that they had junk saddles, the vinyl or plastic Wright or Brooks saddles are always broken, the top cover cracked side to side right in the middle. In my 40 or so years working with old bikes I've only run across one or two with real leather saddles, and those were so badly neglected they were also trash.
The paint is about the same, I don't think Raleigh changed their paint process over the years, at least not on the Sports models.
I've also ran into a few Hercules bikes with pump pegs and cable braze ons. One of the AMF Hercules I've got out in the trailer has pump pegs under the top tube, which I found odd because it still uses clip on cable clamps and loose cables. I'm not sure of the year because it was missing its wheels when I found it but I'd guess it to be late 60's era or so.
I just sold both a later Raleigh LTD3 and a later Hercules like the one mentioned above, both frames were basically identical, the lugs looked the same, neither had pump pegs, and both had Endrick style rims. Sans the decals, fork crown (tubular on the Raleigh), front sprocket pattern (Heron on the LTD3 and star pattern on the Herc), and hand grips (Ribbed style on the LTD3 and plain white on the Herc). they were identical.

cudak888 12-04-20 09:27 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21817762)
The decals look good.
There's only one big problem..
Seller is asking $250.00

Which is an outrageous price given that the fork is bent and it has an obvious bend in the frame too from whatever front-ender it had.

Nevertheless, it is a very interesting example. From the light placement, I'd guess it's UK-market. Decals are nothing like the US Triumphs from the late 1960's, and it's a 23" frame. All very special details there that make it a lot more than the average second-tier Raleigh.

-Kurt

gster 12-04-20 09:45 AM


Originally Posted by cudak888 (Post 21817857)
Which is an outrageous price given that the fork is bent and it has an obvious bend in the frame too from whatever front-ender it had.

Nevertheless, it is a very interesting example. From the light placement, I'd guess it's UK-market. Decals are nothing like the US Triumphs from the late 1960's, and it's a 23" frame. All very special details there that make it a lot more than the average second-tier Raleigh.

-Kurt

Good eye.
I didn't see the fork was off.

cudak888 12-04-20 10:13 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21817891)
Good eye.
I didn't see the fork was off.

Might be possible to pull both the frame and fork into alignment, but until then, I'd categorize it as a very interesting wrecked bike - with potential.

-Kurt

gster 12-04-20 10:45 AM


Originally Posted by cudak888 (Post 21817938)
Might be possible to pull both the frame and fork into alignment, but until then, I'd categorize it as a very interesting wrecked bike - with potential.

-Kurt

I made a promise to myself earlier this year to stop buying "stuff" and I've been quite good.
No bikes (I've got enough), no guitars (same) and have in fact sold off 4 bikes (including a very nice AMF Hercules) and 4 guitars...
I did treat myself to something nice yesterday....
a Dual 1219 turntable.
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3dc969759b.jpg
Top of the line in 1970
retail price then @ $190.00
= $1350.00 today.

nlerner 12-04-20 06:46 PM

To celebrate the end of a very busy work week, I spent some time in the basement this afternoon stripping those two 1930s Raleighs I show above. I suffered only one serious wound in the process with a slipped wrench on a rusted nut (actually that was a couple of days ago), but otherwise pretty much have everything stripped. It seems both had a light spray of black paint on top of how they came from Raleigh, mostly peeling off now but, unfortunate, not revealing any decals underneath.

Here's the headbadge of the lady's frame, a bit different than later models:
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d89828424b.jpg

And I discovered this partial decal on the men's frame top tube. Perhaps it reads "Tourist Super"? But that's not a model I find in the 1937 catalog. Instead, it seems to fit the details of the Sports C Tourist:
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5370303bb7.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...38c80aa6f9.png

The drive-side chainstay has a slight bend to it, probably not enough to affect handling, but I'll still probably try to pull it out. Otherwise, next step is to clean the men's frame up as much as I can.

gster 12-04-20 08:08 PM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 21818753)
To celebrate the end of a very busy work week, I spent some time in the basement this afternoon stripping those two 1930s Raleighs I show above. I suffered only one serious wound in the process with a slipped wrench on a rusted nut (actually that was a couple of days ago), but otherwise pretty much have everything stripped. It seems both had a light spray of black paint on top of how they came from Raleigh, mostly peeling off now but, unfortunate, not revealing any decals underneath.

Here's the headbadge of the lady's frame, a bit different than later models:
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d89828424b.jpg

And I discovered this partial decal on the men's frame top tube. Perhaps it reads "Tourist Super"? But that's not a model I find in the 1937 catalog. Instead, it seems to fit the details of the Sports C Tourist:
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5370303bb7.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...38c80aa6f9.png

The drive-side chainstay has a slight bend to it, probably not enough to affect handling, but I'll still probably try to pull it out. Otherwise, next step is to clean the men's frame up as much as I can.

It's good to have a project this time of year.

nlerner 12-04-20 10:15 PM

I dug up this top tube decal from a '37 Sports Tourist that I owned previously; looks like a match to me!

https://live.staticflickr.com/8275/3...4f630992_b.jpgphoto 2.JPG

oldlugs 12-05-20 01:34 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21817762)
Triumph!
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...c8cc52886f.jpg
Listed here in Toronto as a mid 50's Triumph.
Looks to be complete and in reasonable restorable shape.
The decals look good.
There's only one big problem..
Seller is asking $250.00

I had an almost identical bike about 40 years ago, I was in my late teens and using it to deliver newpapers, (I used that one on the day I want around to collect money). I bent the frame much the same way on mine. There was one road that led downhill to one customers driveway that was a very steep incline. What I would do was to go there last, I'd skip over it, go around the block, and then head down the hill, through the intersection at full speed and up the hill to his house. I did it every week like that until one day in early Feb. one year. It was a cloudy day with a bit of snow on the ground and a light drizzle that was turning to snow on a Saturday afternoon. The guy's driveway was a glazed looking asphalt, (it was shiny even when it was dry). The driveway was bordered all the way to the house walkway with a 3ft tall stone wall. I made my turn onto the street that led to his house, then got up a good head of steam and headed up the driveway. What I didn't count on was black ice on the curb. As I crossed the concrete bump into his driveway, my front tires slide sideways a little but I saved it, but now moving about 20 mph, I turned to correct my course and the bike went out from under me. It slid out on the left side, I actually went down pretty easy, but the bike was spinning counterclockwise on the left pedal. It spun ahead of me about 10ft, lightly bounced off the stone wall and slid front wheel first down the drive about 50ft back toward the street. It missed the open gate and hit the fence post, tire first.
I got up, thinking no big deal, no one saw that. But the front tire now overlapped the down tube and there were strong kinks in both the top and down tubes. Being a few miles from home, and not wanting to carry the thing, I found a firehydrant, took my bike lock cable and ran it through the back wheel across the back hub and around the fire plug, I then grabbed the front forks by each blade and pulled as hard as I could, it bent back surprisingly easy, at least at first. I kept pulling, sort of leaning my weight into it each with each pull. When it wouldn't go any more I figured I'd call it a day and go home. I rode the bike home and surprisingly other than a tight spot in the steering, it rode okay all things considered.
The next day I got more serious about making it better. I tried to pull the forks but the upper nut wouldn't come free, I could tell it was going to either break or strip, so I got all the balls back in place with some fresh grease and put it back the way it was. I got a heavy piece of angle iron with an eye bolt in the middle and placed it behind the forks with the wheel and fender off. I then took another piece of angle iron and put it lengthwise along the seat tube with a chain welded top and bottom. I ran the chains around an oak tree, and hooked a come-along to the front and cranked on it till the thing looked right again. The kinks in the frame took some tapping on with a light hammer as it bent back but it came back about 90% or so. Not wanting to push my luck, I left it alone, put the wheel and fender back on it and took it for a ride. It felt fine so I kept using it. About two years later I was riding it and it ground to a sudden stop as the front wheel locked up, the front axle had broken off just inside of the fixed cone, it broke on a sharp angle and the bearings got between the shoulder of the cone and the race locking up the wheel. I slapped a used wheel on it and kept using it. I ran it till I handed the route off to another kid, I gave him the bike with the route. he used it for a few months till he bought something better.
Considering what that thing went through, it had to be built like a tank. A good bit of my route was on stone roads, some of it was farms and dirt lanes, one driveway was a muddy trail through the woods, and a good bit of it was in the hilly part of town.
The bike was maintained as cheaply as I could, I couldn't afford any other way. I even remember welding washers and longer studs on brake pads to get a little bit more out of them. When it snowed, I had an old tire that I put screws and nuts through for ice traction, I wrapped the inside with duct tape and used thorn resistant tubes filled with tire sealer. The screws would sometimes rub the fenders or catch the edge of the back fender if you picked up a chunk of ice, thus the rear fender was a bit mangled too. Eventually it came off. I put a rack on the back to if I were to slide off the seat there was something between me and the studded rear tire.
I've kept an eye out for years for another Triumph in good condition but I've only run across two or three over the years, every one had a bent frame. The one I had was early 60's vintage, I seem to recall the rear hub was marked 4 64.

I did find myself a rather clean 23" frame 1961 Robin Hood about 20 years ago, but its not the same. My Triumph was originally a yard sale purchase for something like $5 back then. I think the only thing I did to it was replace one tire and patch both tubes. The Robin Hood was in the garage of a house I bought, buried in a pile of junk they told me was trash that they hadn't gotten around to hauling to the dump. When I saw the bike I told them to leave it, I'll deal with it. The bike needed almost nothing but a good clean and lube.
I had it sitting in the driveway a few weeks ago, I had everything pulled out of the garage searching for something.
Someone spotted it as they drove by and and wanted to know if I'd sell it. When I said it wasn't for sale. Right off the bat he offered me $400 for it, he looked it over real good, I even let him ride it a bit, but I just didn't want to sell it.
The guy left me a number in case I change my mind. My thought was that I'd have a tough time finding another one in that shape, and its not even close to the shape that Hercules on CL is in. But its 100% ready to ride so its staying unless I find something I like better.
If that Hercules was my size, it would already be mine I suppose but I need a taller frame. I also considered the idea of buying it for parts, the shiny wheels and other chrome bits would make my Robin Hood a much nicer ride. My front rim has a few fixed dents that aren't 100% and I've been watching for a perfect rim, or a pair of rims to build it a complete spare wheelset but have not found anything any better than what I've got that wasn't an arm and a leg. The last perfect wheelset that I saw on ebay was a few years ago and it went for $175 plus shipping just for the wheels. I somehow don't think I can find a better bike in equal condition for under $400, there's plenty of fixer uppers for $100 to $200, but nothing really well done or rebuilt. Most who flip bikes consider a few shots of oil here and there and maybe a set of brake pads a rebuild. Like a few others mentioned here I tear every bike I get down to the bare frame and do a complete overhaul whether I'm keeping it or not.

cudak888 12-05-20 09:10 AM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 21819041)
I dug up this top tube decal from a '37 Sports Tourist that I owned previously; looks like a match to me!

That looks about right. I don't think Raleigh made any distinction on the frame whether it was a Sports C Tourist or a Sports X Tourist. Near as I can figure it, these terms simply stood for cable or drum brakes, respectively.

...and of course it would have been too logical for Raleigh to call the latter the Sports "D" Tourist.

-Kurt

gster 12-05-20 12:20 PM

Still Out There
Some reasonably priced 3 speeds
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d0a5eea74e.jpg
Raleigh 3 Speed comes with new tires @ $100.00
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b651e0d34d.jpg
Dunelt Skyliner 3 Speed @ $150.00
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...98519549c0.jpg
Triumph 3 Speed @ $50.00
All of these are from the Kijiji Ontario listings.

Iron Horse 12-05-20 02:15 PM

Help with 1976 Spacerider
 
Good afternoon gents!
I have a "I need help" question I hope somebody can answer for me. My phone crapped out last month and among the things that it took from me were the pictures I had taken of this bike's cable routing and clamp location for the three speed and the clamp orientation for the front of the chain guard. I someone could post or send me pictures of these, I would gratefully appreciate it.
Thank you in advance!

Dante41 12-05-20 05:59 PM

Wow, it's certainly been a long long while. After about 3 years I'm finally getting back into biking; I stopped because I wrecked an expensive bike in a crash (coupled with a long employment contract taking away my ability to ride)

I dragged my Raleigh Tourist out of the garage, got it tuned up, and took it for a short 2 mile ride. My knees were burning by the end of it but it felt good to be back in the saddle. The Tourist of course just glided down the pavement like the Cadillac it is! I just wish I had gotten the nerve to start biking again earlier.


https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ec9531e173.jpg

It's funny how much of a parts bin special it is. The hub was made December 1974, the frame was made March 1977, the chain guard is from 1973-1976, and the fenders are from 1978 onward. I have no idea when it was actually made, ha! I know Raleigh was getting a bit ragged at the end for their older-model bikes. Maybe it was from the last year they offered the model, and just threw it together from the parts spares left over from their years of production

gster 12-05-20 06:45 PM


Originally Posted by Dante41 (Post 21820065)
Wow, it's certainly been a long long while. After about 3 years I'm finally getting back into biking; I stopped because I wrecked an expensive bike in a crash (coupled with a long employment contract taking away my ability to ride)

I dragged my Raleigh Tourist out of the garage, got it tuned up, and took it for a short 2 mile ride. My knees were burning by the end of it but it felt good to be back in the saddle. The Tourist of course just glided down the pavement like the Cadillac it is! I just wish I had gotten the nerve to start biking again earlier.


https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ec9531e173.jpg

It's funny how much of a parts bin special it is. The hub was made December 1974, the frame was made March 1977, the chain guard is from 1973-1976, and the fenders are from 1978 onward. I have no idea when it was actually made, ha! I know Raleigh was getting a bit ragged at the end for their older-model bikes. Maybe it was from the last year they offered the model, and just threw it together from the parts spares left over from their years of production

Classic.

bluesteak 12-05-20 07:59 PM

Mongrel lenton
 
I though I would post some photos of the progress so far, and ask a few questions. The dropped bars on the original bike were too cramped for me to ride with the short stem so I opted for regular 3 speed bars, until I find some combination of a stem, bars, and levers that will work. I took it out for a spin, but it was too cold to real give it a full trial.

The rims are Dunlop ea1 , there is no indication that they are “lightweight”. What model of bike could they be from? The front wheel is laced radially with 16 gauge spokes
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3e5875e81.jpeg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2b6c5c601.jpeg
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...de7c79827.jpeg
What era is this lamp bracket from?
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...c5f3e10e1.jpeg
that are 60? Years old. Is it even safe to ride? The rear wheel has a 55AW, again what model bike could this be from?

Lastly I have been looking for an fm/fw hub on eBay. It seems like finding one that has the indicator is pretty much impossible.

Ballenxj 12-05-20 10:04 PM


Originally Posted by Dante41 (Post 21820065)
Wow, it's certainly been a long long while. After about 3 years I'm finally getting back into biking; I stopped because I wrecked an expensive bike in a crash (coupled with a long employment contract taking away my ability to ride)

I dragged my Raleigh Tourist out of the garage, got it tuned up, and took it for a short 2 mile ride. My knees were burning by the end of it but it felt good to be back in the saddle. The Tourist of course just glided down the pavement like the Cadillac it is! I just wish I had gotten the nerve to start biking again earlier.
<----Pic---->
It's funny how much of a parts bin special it is. The hub was made December 1974, the frame was made March 1977, the chain guard is from 1973-1976, and the fenders are from 1978 onward. I have no idea when it was actually made, ha! I know Raleigh was getting a bit ragged at the end for their older-model bikes. Maybe it was from the last year they offered the model, and just threw it together from the parts spares left over from their years of production

Very nice looking fit and finish. Is that by chance a 24 inch frame? It looks a bit taller than the usual large. ;)

Dante41 12-06-20 01:08 AM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 21820347)
Very nice looking fit and finish. Is that by chance a 24 inch frame? It looks a bit taller than the usual large. ;)

It is, yeah!

The finish has one major blemish though, on the backstay. I fell over onto a curb and dented the tube, messing up the paint there too. Thankfully the Tourist still got thick steel so the integrity of the frame isn't impacted, but I've been meaning to get it repaired for years. Never found a black backstay in the right size, though.

cudak888 12-06-20 02:17 AM


Originally Posted by Dante41 (Post 21820456)
It is, yeah!

The finish has one major blemish though, on the backstay. I fell over onto a curb and dented the tube, messing up the paint there too. Thankfully the Tourist still got thick steel so the integrity of the frame isn't impacted, but I've been meaning to get it repaired for years. Never found a black backstay in the right size, though.

Keep looking - I've seen them before. Those bright NOS rear stays for 22" frames on eBay - the ones from Greece - are not the only ones that have come to market in the past.

-Kurt


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