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-   -   Addiction 2022.1 (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1244501)

Mojo31 03-21-22 08:13 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22445721)
How does Lukoil Genesis 0-20 compare to Mobile 1 in the same grade? Or Castrol, for that matter?

Not supposed to buy Rusky stuff like Lukoil products.

bampilot06 03-21-22 08:22 AM

No Dropped Chain this morning! :bday:



I never shifted the front derailerÖÖ..

genejockey 03-21-22 08:36 AM

Meh.
Wordle 275 4/6

⬜🟨🟩🟨⬜
🟩🟨🟩⬜⬜
🟩🟩🟩🟨⬜
🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩

datlas 03-21-22 08:37 AM

lplo

big john 03-21-22 09:40 AM

Wordle 275 4/6

🟨⬜⬜🟨🟨
🟩🟨🟩⬜⬜
🟩⬜🟩🟨⬜
🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩

ls01 03-21-22 09:57 AM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22445739)
No Dropped Chain this morning! :bday:



I never shifted the front derailerÖÖ..

That's another way to go...

datlas 03-21-22 10:43 AM

Hey Seeds! There is someone in "General" asking about road cycling in Yucatan! Can you go offer some help?

Mojo31 03-21-22 11:02 AM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22445739)
No Dropped Chain this morning! :bday:



I never shifted the front derailerÖÖ..

Need your experienced opinion. What could have caused this, one crew intentionally going into a dive while the other tried to stop him?The plane was headed easterly when at 2:20:59pm it began a sudden plunge that would have likely flung objects and any unbelted passengers violently to the ceiling. It went from level flight to a descent rate of almost 31,000 feet per minute in about five seconds.

But after about 45 seconds, the descent became less steep and for a few moments the jet climbed by more than 1,000 feet. It went from 7,425 feet up to 8,600 feet in about 10 seconds, according to the FlightRadar data, which is based on data transmitted by the plane. Just as the earlier dive would have flung items to the ceiling, the climb would have created huge gravitational forces, pinning people in their seats.

The climb was short-lived. The jet resumed its dive seconds later, plunging again at about 31,000 feet per minute. The last position recorded on the FlightRadar track was at 2:22:36pm, about a minute and 35 seconds after it began.

Itís not clear what would have triggered such an extreme maneuver. The jet turned to the right and left slightly during the descent, but remained on a mostly easterly heading.

bampilot06 03-21-22 11:17 AM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22445905)
Need your experienced opinion. What could have caused this, one crew intentionally going into a dive while the other tried to stop him?The plane was headed easterly when at 2:20:59pm it began a sudden plunge that would have likely flung objects and any unbelted passengers violently to the ceiling. It went from level flight to a descent rate of almost 31,000 feet per minute in about five seconds.

But after about 45 seconds, the descent became less steep and for a few moments the jet climbed by more than 1,000 feet. It went from 7,425 feet up to 8,600 feet in about 10 seconds, according to the FlightRadar data, which is based on data transmitted by the plane. Just as the earlier dive would have flung items to the ceiling, the climb would have created huge gravitational forces, pinning people in their seats.

The climb was short-lived. The jet resumed its dive seconds later, plunging again at about 31,000 feet per minute. The last position recorded on the FlightRadar track was at 2:22:36pm, about a minute and 35 seconds after it began.

Itís not clear what would have triggered such an extreme maneuver. The jet turned to the right and left slightly during the descent, but remained on a mostly easterly heading.


Severe turbulence caused the airframe to break

or

The horizontal stabilizer got stuck nose down. The whole thing moves to trim the aircraft. Itís a jack screw.

First time on a 737 but it has happened on an Md- 80s in the past


or


Crew really didnít want to make it to their destination.

Mojo31 03-21-22 11:26 AM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22445922)
Severe turbulence caused the airframe to break

or

The horizontal stabilizer got stuck nose down. The whole thing moves to trim the aircraft. Itís a jack screw.

First time on a 737 but it has happened on an Md- 80s in the past


or


Crew really didnít want to make it to their destination.

And, I've been telling my wife that turbulence has never caused an airliner to crash.

Mojo31 03-21-22 11:35 AM

Just saw the video of that plane crashing after a near vertical descent. Can't imagine the terror for those onboard.

phrantic09 03-21-22 11:39 AM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22445927)
And, I've been telling my wife that turbulence has never caused an airliner to crash.


First time for everything?

I canít imagine the terror either.

bampilot06 03-21-22 11:54 AM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22445927)
And, I've been telling my wife that turbulence has never caused an airliner to crash.


I have no idea what the MX standards of China are. I have no idea how often inspections are completed, if they even document issues. I know itís not the same as over here.


Airliners are built to handle some incredible Gs. I am just spitballing, and off the top of my head I am not sure if I can think of an inflight break up due to turbulence.


If you study airplane crashes, 90 percent of them are a multitude of errors. Usually there is the main error, but itís a combination that leads to the crash.


29,000 feet you have a pretty big speed window. The higher you go the smaller the window. Basically you are confined to a speed of 250 plus or minus 10 knots. If you go above you could over speed the airplane if you go below you can stall the airplane. At 29,000 the window is much larger and the 737 can cruise at around 310 indicated. 310 isnít the max indicated airspeed but it provides cushion from over speeding.


Maybe they stalled, which then inadvertently led to a compression stall and loss of power, my only problem with this theory is the plane is going straight down.

The faster the air moves over a wing the more lift it creates. The plane will start to climb again until the energy is bled off, wing stalls again and then it will dive again. If you are high you might see this happen a couple of times.

For what little knowledge I have, for a plane to be going to straight down it would have to be held in that position, A significant piece of airplane is missing, or complete flight control malfunction.

Mojo31 03-21-22 12:22 PM

When I was in law school, I worked for a firm that handled insurance claims arising from general aviation crashes. The crashes virtually always resulted from a VFR pilot taking off and encountering IFR conditions. There was virtually always someone on the ground who described the plane coming down in a vertical death spiral. Cannot imagine that ride down.

seedsbelize2 03-21-22 12:55 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22445731)
Not supposed to buy Rusky stuff like Lukoil products.

Didn't know it was Ruskie. I found a Mexican brand I'm going to go with. 65 years in business and half the price of Mobile 1

seedsbelize2 03-21-22 12:56 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22445888)
Hey Seeds! There is someone in "General" asking about road cycling in Yucatan! Can you go offer some help?

Tkd. Will do

bampilot06 03-21-22 01:05 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22446001)
When I was in law school, I worked for a firm that handled insurance claims arising from general aviation crashes. The crashes virtually always resulted from a VFR pilot taking off and encountering IFR conditions. There was virtually always someone on the ground who described the plane coming down in a vertical death spiral. Cannot imagine that ride down.


its amazing how quickly you can get disoriented in the clouds when you are not proficient. Ask me how I know.

datlas 03-21-22 01:39 PM

One of my cycling buddies is a retired airline pilot and before that was a navy pilot. I could not do what he has done. He is now retired and has a good life, could not happen to a better guy.

bampilot06 03-21-22 01:52 PM

Oh, I left out rapid decompression. Pilots could have become hypoxic.

Mojo31 03-21-22 01:59 PM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22446119)
Oh, I left out rapid decompression. Pilots could have become hypoxic.

That's what happened to Payne Stewart's plane years ago. But, the plane kept flying until it depleted its fuel due to being on auto-pilot. Wouldn't the 737 be on auto-pilot after takeoff, at least, until close to landing? If so, it seems it would have continued to fly off its fuel.

If you think about it, cabin decompression might be the best thing because then all the souls would go unconscious and would not experience the terror of the descent, wouldn't it?

phrantic09 03-21-22 02:06 PM

About to head out for a short ride- winds are out of the west at 22, gusting to 37. Should be a party

phrantic09 03-21-22 02:07 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22446142)
About to head out for a short ride- winds are out of the west at 22, gusting to 37. Should be a party

Thereís a chance I say **** it and go for a run instead.

bampilot06 03-21-22 02:08 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22446129)
That's what happened to Payne Stewart's plane years ago. But, the plane kept flying until it depleted its fuel due to being on auto-pilot. Wouldn't the 737 be on auto-pilot after takeoff, at least, until close to landing? If so, it seems it would have continued to fly off its fuel.

If you think about it, cabin decompression might be the best thing because then all the souls would go unconscious and would not experience the terror of the descent, wouldn't it?


typically when something goes wrong the autopilot is clicked off. Aircraft control is the most important thing, and when the alarms first sound you wonít know what the problem could be. They should have gotten a master warning light. Red light flashing at eye level as well as master caution. This would alert both pilots to then look up at the pressure control panel above the FOs head. Rapid decompression the very next thing is to put the mask on. If there was a delay or the problem was diagnosed wrong then yea they would have passed out and slumped on the controls.

The mask automatically drop in the back, so for the passengers that put the mask on then they would be awake for the ride. Again just speculating. Iím sure the news will have all kinds of ďexpertsĒ with even more ideas than me.

I mention this one, because from what I am reading the pilots were not communicating at all. In any emergency situation you always Aviate (fly the airplane) Navigate then communicate. It might have been the problem was so great they didnít have time to communicate.


Hope I am never in that situation.

bampilot06 03-21-22 02:09 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22446144)
Thereís a chance I say **** it and go for a run instead.


Just ride east for 40 miles then make the call of shame.

phrantic09 03-21-22 02:10 PM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22446148)
Just ride east for 40 miles then make the call of shame.

Oh Iím considering having my wife drop me off 25 miles west and see if I can make it home in an hour


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