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Velo Vol 12-01-21 09:54 AM

Map of the Day

1 December 2021

Private fusion companies


https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...96720825d9.png

Mojo31 12-01-21 09:54 AM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22325518)
If a truck can manage with three speeds, a cyclist should be just fine with "only" ten.

https://twitter.com/Bringatrailer/st...37117943881733

Since the truck weighs much more than a cyclist, shouldn't the cyclist be able to do just fine with less gears than the truck?

rjones28 12-01-21 10:01 AM

Sometimes, one gear is all you need.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3186391fe2.png

big john 12-01-21 10:03 AM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22325524)
Since the truck weighs much more than a cyclist, shouldn't the cyclist be able to do just fine with less gears than the truck?

Having owned and driven older 3 speed vehicles and even 2 speed automatics I can say those vehicles would be quicker, more efficient, have better top speed, and be more of a pleasure to drive had they been equipped with 5 or even 4 speeds with overdrive.
Best thing I did to my last old pick up was install an overdrive transmission with a lock up torque converter. It went from screaming @ 65mph to cruising quietly.

Sometimes more really is better.

genejockey 12-01-21 10:06 AM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22325324)
Staph aureus enterotoxin is heat stable, but refrigeration prevents it. Botulinum toxin, on the other hand, which is the big danger in canned goods, is easily destroyed by heating.

We did often wonder whether Dad's good health (no prescription meds till he was 99) was due in part to a strong immune system.

Velo Vol 12-01-21 10:06 AM


Originally Posted by rjones28 (Post 22325537)
One handlebar colour is all you need.

Fixed.

Mojo31 12-01-21 10:09 AM


Originally Posted by rjones28 (Post 22325537)
Sometimes, one gear is all you need.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3186391fe2.png

You ride that thing? All I've ever seen are pictures of it leaning against something.

abshipp 12-01-21 10:12 AM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22325346)
:twitchy:

The things we do for the pets we love.
​​​​​​

Speaking of...

Vet day for these two:

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...cafc63cb3d.jpg

genejockey 12-01-21 10:13 AM


Originally Posted by ls01 (Post 22325309)
'84,

Then it would have been one of those, since she'd have been riding it in the late 80s/early 90s.

genejockey 12-01-21 10:20 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize2 (Post 22325369)
In Belize we heated leftovers to boiling for a few minutes every 12 hours. Tropical and no refrigeration. Of course we weren't eating that fancy schmancy food. Mostly beans and rice and vegies.

This reminds me of why some parts of the US have a tradition of making Country Ham - ie dry cured, not brine-pumped - and others don't. You need to have enough days that are below danger but above freezing for the cure to penetrate. Too cold and the cure doesn't get in, too warm and the meat spoils first. This is why you have Virginia and Kentucky and Tennessee making country hams, but not, say, Vermont or Florida.

genejockey 12-01-21 10:32 AM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22325500)
MoAlpha or other: Exactly what is required to get an "abstract" made public? If this was so clearly bad info, how did it get put up on this site?

https://twitter.com/aetiology/status...93297301770245

Almost nothing. No peer review. A poster is literally that - you make a poster with your methods, results, and conclusions and physically stand by it to present it during a session where there are dozens to hundreds of other posters (depending on the size of the conference) to answer questions from attendees. Conferences often put together a book with all the abstracts, so you can choose which posters you want to visit, based on your own interests. The abstracts are often then published on the conference's websites.

Abstracts are generally not peer reviewed in any way because they don't contain the data, and posters don't carry the weight of an actual published article.

This is something we in the Scientific community understand, but lay people do not - the appearance of an assertion in an abstract is damn near meaningless.

genejockey 12-01-21 10:33 AM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22325518)
If a truck can manage with three speeds, a cyclist should be just fine with "only" ten.

https://twitter.com/Bringatrailer/st...37117943881733

Only if the cyclist has a 6 or 8 cylinder engine.....

MoAlpha 12-01-21 10:34 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22325543)
We did often wonder whether Dad's good health (no prescription meds till he was 99) was due in part to a strong immune system.

Sounds like good genes, the right environment, and conservative medical care. All good things.

MoAlpha 12-01-21 10:39 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22325567)
Almost nothing. No peer review. A poster is literally that - you make a poster with your methods, results, and conclusions and physically stand by it to present it during a session where there are dozens to hundreds of other posters (depending on the size of the conference) to answer questions from attendees. Conferences often put together a book with all the abstracts, so you can choose which posters you want to visit, based on your own interests. The abstracts are often then published on the conference's websites.

Abstracts are generally not peer reviewed in any way because they don't contain the data, and posters don't carry the weight of an actual published article.

This is something we in the Scientific community understand, but lay people do not - the appearance of an assertion in an abstract is damn near meaningless.

This is all correct. However, conferences often review poster and short talk submissions for quality and often publish them in special issues of otherwise peer-reviewed publications where they become citable, adding to the confusion. And then there are abstracts of published and ostensibly peer-reviewed journal articles, which are a different thing.

This one is worth the electrons it's printed on.

genejockey 12-01-21 10:46 AM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22325569)
Sounds like good genes, the right environment, and conservative medical care. All good things.

He was one of those lucky people who never really had to worry about weight, or diet, and he remained slender his whole life. His diet was pretty well balanced, but did not avoid fats or sugars.

big john 12-01-21 10:47 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22325568)
Only if the cyclist has a 6 or 8 cylinder engine.....

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/c2/24/15/c...5981e07a73.jpg

Trsnrtr 12-01-21 10:53 AM


Originally Posted by Reflector Guy (Post 22325508)
Interesting that that is the one in Cruger. I've driven by there MANY times....

I grew up 7 miles west of Cruger and ride by there frequently. I remember when Cruger had several houses still standing.

genejockey 12-01-21 11:02 AM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22325577)
This is all correct. However, conferences often review poster and short talk submissions for quality and often publish them in special issues of otherwise peer-reviewed publications where they become citable, adding to the confusion. And then there are abstracts of published and ostensibly peer-reviewed journal articles, which are a different thing.

This one is worth the electrons it's printed on.

This is the problem with the internet - it makes everything available to everyone, but doesn't teach you how to evaluate it. And even peer review assumes your data are real, so actual fraud can slip through and get published, and only later when nobody can replicate the results will it be exposed.

When I was at Cornell, there was a graduate student who was the star of the department, and published a series of papers in top flight journals, and ALL OF IT was bulls**t. Literally made up from whole cloth, and the data faked, including gels and autorads. He worked hard at it, possibly harder than he'd have had to work to get ACTUAL results.

genejockey 12-01-21 11:06 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22325588)

Love the proximity of the headers to the rider's nethers.

Velo Vol 12-01-21 11:09 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22325567)
Almost nothing. No peer review. A poster is literally that - you make a poster with your methods, results, and conclusions and physically stand by it to present it during a session where there are dozens to hundreds of other posters (depending on the size of the conference) to answer questions from attendees.

Presumably it's made by someone with some scientific credibility. Or could I show up at a witch doctor conference with my self-study findings on the effectiveness of drugs?

Mojo31 12-01-21 11:17 AM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22325614)
Presumably it's made by someone with some scientific credibility. Or could I show up at a witch doctor conference with my self-study findings on the effectiveness of drugs?

As long as you use fancy words that 99.9% of the population don't understand, you'll be fine.

DougRNS 12-01-21 11:24 AM


Originally Posted by rjones28 (Post 22325537)
Sometimes, one gear is all you need.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3186391fe2.png

Reminds me of this having watched all 8 hours of the get back documentary.


MoAlpha 12-01-21 11:30 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22325608)
This is the problem with the internet - it makes everything available to everyone, but doesn't teach you how to evaluate it. And even peer review assumes your data are real, so actual fraud can slip through and get published, and only later when nobody can replicate the results will it be exposed.

When I was at Cornell, there was a graduate student who was the star of the department, and published a series of papers in top flight journals, and ALL OF IT was bulls**t. Literally made up from whole cloth, and the data faked, including gels and autorads. He worked hard at it, possibly harder than he'd have had to work to get ACTUAL results.

During my fellowship, my best buddy published a string of very high profile stuff, including a paper in Science, some of which I was on and most of which was at least partially fake. A smart journal reviewer figured out one of his little frauds and told our boss, who panicked and decided to keep it all hidden and play dumb if the authorities ever found out. This boy also dicked me around in a hundred ways which only became apparent later, including inviting me to his European lab as a visiting professor when we were junior faculty and then sticking me with the bill, which I had to pay out of pocket because he promised travel for my wife and kid plus an honorarium, and I did it as outside activity.

He went on to a chaired professorship and vice-deanship at Harvard Medical School, where the hanky-panky continued. A few years ago, he got busted for sexual inappropriateness (a chronic issue with him, I later found out) and lost all his NIH support. However, it was kept absolutely hermetically silent by HMS and they shifted him to another slightly less fancy position. My old boss, that reviewer, and other people who know never stopped doing business with him and inviting him to ****. People all over the world still line up to kiss his ass, although lots of them detest him.

That made me pretty cynical about science as an institution, even though it has put lots of food on the table over the years.

rjones28 12-01-21 11:32 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22325540)
Having owned and driven older 3 speed vehicles and even 2 speed automatics I can say those vehicles would be quicker, more efficient, have better top speed, and be more of a pleasure to drive had they been equipped with 5 or even 4 speeds with overdrive.
Best thing I did to my last old pick up was install an overdrive transmission with a lock up torque converter. It went from screaming @ 65mph to cruising quietly.

Sometimes more really is better.

The SportWagen (seen above) has 6 speeds. Will cruise quietly, at highway speeds, all day long.

rjones28 12-01-21 11:33 AM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22325544)
Fixed.

Some people here don't get it.


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