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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

paulb_in_bkln 02-18-19 08:32 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20800184)
Yes, a 100% wool argyle would be period correct here.

Whoever it was could have at least stuck both socks in there so there'd be a matched pair.

gster 02-21-19 06:58 AM

This Canadian Superbe is for sale again @ $200.00 here in Toronto.
The stamped eye on the heron would place it as a 1961 or earlier.
Hard to tell but the forks look a bit suspect...
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3815630366.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...a5c6a0eb18.jpg

sd5782 02-21-19 06:59 AM

Handlebar bend choices
 
I searched this thread and didn't see much on the topic, but do see several pics. My 64 has the factory bars that were common to the era and kind of narrow and bent well back, so steering is kind of like a tiller. This doesn't seem to give as much control to me. From some of the pics I see, it looks as though Raleigh handlebars in the 70s were a bit more splayed out at an angle. I think I may look for some like that at my local bike co-op. They would need to have a bit of patina to match the rest of the bike.

I have other bikes to suit different jobs, but thought just a bit more bend and rise might be nice on this casual bike. What do others like, considering a vintage look too? Bike has a B72 saddle for somewhat upright riding position.
Steve

gster 02-21-19 07:03 AM

Here's a nice step through at a reasonable $125.00.
These forks look a little pushed in as well..

https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...8d732e1ab5.jpg

BigChief 02-21-19 11:24 AM


Originally Posted by sd5782 (Post 20805300)
I searched this thread and didn't see much on the topic, but do see several pics. My 64 has the factory bars that were common to the era and kind of narrow and bent well back, so steering is kind of like a tiller. This doesn't seem to give as much control to me. From some of the pics I see, it looks as though Raleigh handlebars in the 70s were a bit more splayed out at an angle. I think I may look for some like that at my local bike co-op. They would need to have a bit of patina to match the rest of the bike.

I have other bikes to suit different jobs, but thought just a bit more bend and rise might be nice on this casual bike. What do others like, considering a vintage look too? Bike has a B72 saddle for somewhat upright riding position.
Steve

As far as I know, Raleigh used the same shape handle bars on the Sports and other light roadster bikes since at least the early 50s. If you decide to change them, remember the stem is made for 15/16" bars and standard 1" bars won't fit. Any 22.2mm stem will fit the fork tube so it wouldn't be hard to modify.

dweenk 02-21-19 11:44 AM

I think the person you responded to was talking bar width, not diameter. I have seen Sports bars from 21 to 25 inches wide.

Piff 02-21-19 03:51 PM

sturmey archer aw3...
 
I am confused by IGH hubs. How does the hub's axle length work in regards to the bike's OLD?

I have a '74 raleigh supercourse that has been spread to 130mm and I'd like to put a 3speed hub on it. Is it simply a matter of spacers between the hub and the dropouts?

​​​​​​For example, this hub seems nice, but I have no idea if it would play well with 130mm (as I assume it was built for a 120mm bike?), and if it could be simply fixed by buying a 130mm axle and adding spacers.

Thanks.
​​
https://www.ebay.com/itm/NOS-1969-St...pe!92128!US!-1

nlerner 02-21-19 04:29 PM

S-A axles came in two sizes: 5 3/4" for 115mm rear spacing and 6 1/4" for 120mm rear spacing. I don't think the latter will be long enough, i.e., you won't be able to get good purchase with axle nuts, in a frame spaced to 130mm. I'd suggest cold setting the SuperCourse rear triangle to 115 or 120mm and hope that the rear end of that frame hasn't been through lots of respacing over the years!

Piff 02-21-19 05:07 PM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 20806271)
S-A axles came in two sizes: 5 3/4" for 115mm rear spacing and 6 1/4" for 120mm rear spacing. I don't think the latter will be long enough, i.e., you won't be able to get good purchase with axle nuts, in a frame spaced to 130mm. I'd suggest cold setting the SuperCourse rear triangle to 115 or 120mm and hope that the rear end of that frame hasn't been through lots of respacing over the years!

Thanks, this helps.

So there's no possibility of buying a replacement axle and building the hub around it? I guess for the frame's sake it's probably best for me to buy a newer hub based around a 130mm OLD rather than cold set it again.

BigChief 02-21-19 07:19 PM

I think the modern SA RX-RF5 would be a good choice.

browngw 02-21-19 07:46 PM

Royal Nord President Brampton 3 Speed
 
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...064574a166.jpg
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3b42aeda66.jpg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...a203de92cd.jpg
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...05ad1a49d2.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9a77f2d84f.jpg
The Belgium Royal Nord President is home as of this evening. What a mix of components, Spitfire mudguards with plane icon stamped in the alloy, Weinmann 810 brakes, Dunlop Imperial 28"x1 1/2" tires (made in Canada) Brampton hub and shifter and lots more to discover! Really thrilled to have this bike and intend to refurbish and treasure it. More to follow.
The rear rack is marble painted to match the frame. I believe it will polish up beautifully.

markk900 02-21-19 08:13 PM

@browngw: just wow! What a treasure and so many details to draw the eye.....

sd5782 02-21-19 08:41 PM

Yes, mine are narrow
 

Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 20805749)
I think the person you responded to was talking bar width, not diameter. I have seen Sports bars from 21 to 25 inches wide.

I just measured bar width on mine, and they were only 21 wide so I may look for some wider ones. Are the Raleigh bars a proprietary diameter then?

BigChief 02-22-19 05:03 AM


Originally Posted by sd5782 (Post 20806593)

I just measured bar width on mine, and they were only 21 wide so I may look for some wider ones. Are the Raleigh bars a proprietary diameter then?

Yes, they are 15/16", Not only Raleigh. Many other older English bikes also. But there's plenty of 22.2mm (7/8") stems with 1 inch clamps to choose from. You might need to make up new cables if you move the shifter and brake levers too far from their original positions though.

sd5782 02-22-19 06:51 AM

Might see what co-op has
 

Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20806868)
Yes, they are 15/16", Not only Raleigh. Many other older English bikes also. But there's plenty of 22.2mm (7/8") stems with 1 inch clamps to choose from. You might need to make up new cables if you move the shifter and brake levers too far from their original positions though.

Thanks Big Chief for clarifying that a bit. As the other poster mentioned there are Raleigh bars up to 25" wide. I may see if the co-op has some. I didn't want to switch to 1" bars, as then the levers and shifter and grips wouldn't work. I would also like bars with a bit of patina to match the rest of the bike too, so nothing new. I have enough cable to get that bit of extra I need. It is the angle more than the width I think.

carfreefamily 02-22-19 11:30 AM

Oil Filler on the Bottom Bracket:

My 1952 Raleigh has the oil filler on the bottom bracket that consisted of a spring holding a ball in place.

When I disassembled the bottom bracket, there was just a spring hanging down through the hole. I pulled it out with a pair of needle nose pliers. Somehow, the bearing seemed to be nowhere to be found.

I will, most likely, simply grease the bearings as usual, and I know I can just put a dab of silicone in the hole to keep the water out, but does anyone know if that type of filler is threaded in there, so I could unscrew it and screw in a functional replacement, just to have it as it should be, even if I do go with grease?

I was also curious, for those who go with oiling the bearings - what do you do when you rebuild them? Do you use grease to start with, to hold the bearings in place while reassembling? Do you give them an initial dousing of oil instead of grease, and chase them around like herding cats to get everything back together?

My front hub is also fitted with an oil port, and I'm wondering the same thing there.

I kind of like the idea of giving them a little squirt of oil once a week. It looks like there are various opinions on the use of oil on various threads on BF, that boil down to a) use oil, it washes gunk away and b) use grease, it works well and you don't have to worry about oiling it regularly.

Ged117 02-22-19 01:24 PM


Originally Posted by carfreefamily (Post 20807284)
Oil Filler on the Bottom Bracket:

My 1952 Raleigh has the oil filler on the bottom bracket that consisted of a spring holding a ball in place.

When I disassembled the bottom bracket, there was just a spring hanging down through the hole. I pulled it out with a pair of needle nose pliers. Somehow, the bearing seemed to be nowhere to be found.

I will, most likely, simply grease the bearings as usual, and I know I can just put a dab of silicone in the hole to keep the water out, but does anyone know if that type of filler is threaded in there, so I could unscrew it and screw in a functional replacement, just to have it as it should be, even if I do go with grease?

I was also curious, for those who go with oiling the bearings - what do you do when you rebuild them? Do you use grease to start with, to hold the bearings in place while reassembling? Do you give them an initial dousing of oil instead of grease, and chase them around like herding cats to get everything back together?

My front hub is also fitted with an oil port, and I'm wondering the same thing there.

I kind of like the idea of giving them a little squirt of oil once a week. It looks like there are various opinions on the use of oil on various threads on BF, that boil down to a) use oil, it washes gunk away and b) use grease, it works well and you don't have to worry about oiling it regularly.

With my '50 Superbe (equipped with the spring ball oiler), I initially poured a bunch of 5W30 down the seat tube and laid the bike on its side to get the oil into the bearings and flush out the nasty stuff. It now rotates smoothly and the oil that leaked out eventually looked clean. I don't have a cotter press handy and I don't want to pay the currency exchange or the shipping across the border for the Bike Smith one, so it'll have to do for now. I bought an oil needle which fits inside the spring ball oiler just fine. I'll add oil every now and again and service the BB at a later time. Certainly within the continental States the Bike Smith cotter press is a good deal and makes the maintenance of cottered cranks and bottom brackets easy.

eatontkd 02-22-19 02:14 PM

New rims for tired wheels.
 
My '53 Rudge Sport got new wheels. The old rims developed a crack down the middle. Not bad for 66 year old wheels! I'm thinking these new rims should own the path much better.
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...eaef2df64d.jpg
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...70db1740bb.jpg
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...971f8ea47d.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...490acc89f1.jpg

browngw 02-22-19 02:28 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20779369)
Cool 5 pin crank. Is that ring bolt on or riveted? See if you can find a makers mark on it somewhere.

The chainguard is super 60's cool as well.

No makers mark found yet but it does look like strange little screws holding the CR on. Also a partial split BB arrangement. https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ea974cf0b3.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...cc713eb61a.jpg
The BB has an oil port as well. Into some new territory on this one!

BigChief 02-22-19 02:36 PM


Originally Posted by carfreefamily (Post 20807284)
Oil Filler on the Bottom Bracket:

My 1952 Raleigh has the oil filler on the bottom bracket that consisted of a spring holding a ball in place.

When I disassembled the bottom bracket, there was just a spring hanging down through the hole. I pulled it out with a pair of needle nose pliers. Somehow, the bearing seemed to be nowhere to be found.

I will, most likely, simply grease the bearings as usual, and I know I can just put a dab of silicone in the hole to keep the water out, but does anyone know if that type of filler is threaded in there, so I could unscrew it and screw in a functional replacement, just to have it as it should be, even if I do go with grease?

I was also curious, for those who go with oiling the bearings - what do you do when you rebuild them? Do you use grease to start with, to hold the bearings in place while reassembling? Do you give them an initial dousing of oil instead of grease, and chase them around like herding cats to get everything back together?

My front hub is also fitted with an oil port, and I'm wondering the same thing there.

I kind of like the idea of giving them a little squirt of oil once a week. It looks like there are various opinions on the use of oil on various threads on BF, that boil down to a) use oil, it washes gunk away and b) use grease, it works well and you don't have to worry about oiling it regularly.

If you want to stay period correct, the thing you'll be searching for is called a ball oiler. Alternatively, you could use the later flip top style oiler, but those are threaded in and the ball type are press fit. I've never replaced one of these. Not sure what size they are, but here's the Mc Master Carr catalog page.
https://www.mcmaster.com/ball-oilers

carfreefamily 02-22-19 02:49 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20807599)
If you want to stay period correct, the thing you'll be searching for is called a ball oiler. Alternatively, you could use the later flip top style oiler, but those are threaded in and the ball type are press fit. I've never replaced one of these. Not sure what size they are, but here's the Mc Master Carr catalog page.
https://www.mcmaster.com/ball-oilers

Thanks Big Chief. I'll see if I can wiggle the old one out of the bottom bracket like an old tooth. If it doesn't want to come along nicely, maybe I'll leave well enough alone and seal it somehow. If I can get it to slide out of place, I'll order a replacement ball type.

The bike goes to the local frame builder tomorrow to have some restoration done on the spread and rounded rear dropouts. I may take the fork to the locksmith to see if he can make a key for the lock. (Though I have to admit I'm paranoid about leaving parts of the bike scattered about town. I'd hate to go back to the locksmith and have him say "what fork?") In for a penny in for a pound.

I'm still waiting for it to warm up enough to do some rattle-can touchup on places I sanded the slight surface rust away.

It's slowly coming along.

carfreefamily 02-22-19 02:51 PM


Originally Posted by eatontkd (Post 20807560)
My '53 Rudge Sport got new wheels. The old rims developed a crack down the middle. Not bad for 66 year old wheels! I'm thinking these new rims should own the path much better.
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...eaef2df64d.jpg
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...70db1740bb.jpg
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...971f8ea47d.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...490acc89f1.jpg

I don't see an anti-rotation washer on that rear wheel! Did the Rudge not have them? Or is it only on the non-drive side?

clubman 02-22-19 03:16 PM


Originally Posted by carfreefamily (Post 20807284)
Oil Filler on the Bottom Bracket:

does anyone know if that type of filler is threaded in there, so I could unscrew it and screw in a functional replacement, just to have it as it should be, even if I do go with grease?

I was also curious, for those who go with oiling the bearings - what do you do when you rebuild them? Do you use grease to start with, to hold the bearings in place while reassembling? Do you give them an initial dousing of oil instead of grease, and chase them around like herding cats to get everything back together?

My front hub is also fitted with an oil port, and I'm wondering the same thing there.

I kind of like the idea of giving them a little squirt of oil once a week. It looks like there are various opinions on the use of oil on various threads on BF, that boil down to a) use oil, it washes gunk away and b) use grease, it works well and you don't have to worry about oiling it regularly.

The metal oil ports are threaded so can be replaced. Repack with grease only and then you can use a drop or two of oil maybe once or twice a year to keep the grease from hardening. Oil dissipates very slowly and will migrate out of your hubs, onto wheels, brakes pads, clothes etc so the weekly drop or two will become a mess.

Really, the only bikes that used oil only are track bikes AFAIK.

BigChief 02-22-19 03:28 PM


Originally Posted by carfreefamily (Post 20807632)
I don't see an anti-rotation washer on that rear wheel! Did the Rudge not have them? Or is it only on the non-drive side?

It would be easy for a frame builder to replace the ball oiler while you have the frame there anyway. The hub should have anti rotation washers on both sides.
Like these. https://www.ebay.com/itm/STURMEY-ARC...frcectupt=true

RobbieTunes 02-22-19 03:38 PM

Am I going to get in trouble if I swap my '59 Sports SA wheel/shifter for the SA wheel from my '60's Schwinn Speedster?

If I keep the same rims and SA hubs (heavy nice chrome, etc,) will I get into purist purgatory if I relace with stainless spokes instead of the galvanized. Bike is OEM but could be a lot prettier, and I'd like to ride it quite a bit.

Salubrious 02-22-19 03:44 PM

@RobbieTunes
The rim won't fit will it? They are entirely different sizes, and the Schwinn is a lot harder to find tires for.

I think all my 3-speeds have stainless spokes.

Sun alloy rims are the usual goto for replacements. They've had 32 (front) and 40 (rear) in 26"x 1 3/8" (650A).

BigChief 02-22-19 04:09 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 20807695)
@RobbieTunes
The rim won't fit will it? They are entirely different sizes, and the Schwinn is a lot harder to find tires for.

I think all my 3-speeds have stainless spokes.

Sun alloy rims are the usual goto for replacements. They've had 32 (front) and 40 (rear) in 26"x 1 3/8" (650A).

My 51 Rudge has stainless spokes too. They still look new. Not sure when they changed to galvanized. A cost cutting measure I assume.

eatontkd 02-22-19 07:42 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20807674)
...The hub should have anti rotation washers on both sides.
Like these. https://www.ebay.com/itm/STURMEY-ARC...frcectupt=true

Thanks for the advice. I ordered the ones you recommended.

thumpism 02-23-19 07:47 AM

How about a classy Eye-talian 3-speed? Sturmey hubbed! Not cheap, but a neat looking ride.

https://richmond.craigslist.org/bik/...826156882.html

'67 BIANCHI Bicycle 3 spd Womans Pullman - $350 (Claremont)

https://images.craigslist.org/00T0T_...jG_600x450.jpg
https://images.craigslist.org/00r0r_...Ba_600x450.jpg

bicycle type: other
frame size: 26"
make / manufacturer: Bianchi
model name / number: Pullman
wheel size: 26 in
1967 Bianchi Woman's Bicycle
Marked: PULLMAN
26" 3 Speed
Nice Overall Condition, Needs Detailing
Will Be Removed When SOLD

gster 02-23-19 08:10 AM


Originally Posted by carfreefamily (Post 20807629)
Thanks Big Chief. I'll see if I can wiggle the old one out of the bottom bracket like an old tooth. If it doesn't want to come along nicely, maybe I'll leave well enough alone and seal it somehow. If I can get it to slide out of place, I'll order a replacement ball type.

The bike goes to the local frame builder tomorrow to have some restoration done on the spread and rounded rear dropouts. I may take the fork to the locksmith to see if he can make a key for the lock. (Though I have to admit I'm paranoid about leaving parts of the bike scattered about town. I'd hate to go back to the locksmith and have him say "what fork?") In for a penny in for a pound.

I'm still waiting for it to warm up enough to do some rattle-can touchup on places I sanded the slight surface rust away.

It's slowly coming along.

A key can be made with the code number stamped on the lock.
Provided they have the blanks,


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