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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

slowtostart 05-09-16 10:42 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18752672)
A picture would help. Are you talking about the casing cap that connects the casing to the shifter?
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=520558

I'll take a picture later this afternoon. No, it's not that cap. It is at what I would label the top of the shifter if looking down on it. There is a narrow piece/band of metal which seems spring loaded and snaps into the notches on the trigger when changing gears. It is sandwiched between the sides of the case.

Thanks for your patience. Even though I was sad to realize we have a mechanical failure, it was enjoyable to hunt for the cause. Now if we can only convince him the saddle will become more comfortable....

slowtostart 05-09-16 10:55 AM

Neal has saved the day!

agmetal 05-09-16 11:10 AM

Question for anyone who's rebuilt 28" roadster wheels - does anyone know what the ERD is? I'm planning to buy a pair of NOS Westwood rims, I think Dunlop

Salubrious 05-09-16 12:32 PM


Originally Posted by agmetal (Post 18752803)
Question for anyone who's rebuilt 28" roadster wheels - does anyone know what the ERD is? I'm planning to buy a pair of NOS Westwood rims, I think Dunlop


40-635, 700B (700 x 38mm) = 28" x 1.5"

agmetal 05-09-16 12:34 PM

Thanks, but I'm looking for ERD for spoke length, not ETRTO for tire sizing

Velocivixen 05-09-16 02:59 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18752672)
A picture would help. Are you talking about the casing cap that connects the casing to the shifter?
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=520558

@slowtostart is referring to the pawl which has a pawl spring on it - you know, keeps the shift lever in desired gear.

markk900 05-09-16 03:29 PM

@slowtostart: I assume Neal has come up with a replacement shifter....that pawl spring is replaceable but only if you take the entire shifter apart *and* have the requisite replacement pieces. For a 70s bike the shifters are readily available (usually only the plastic is broken....

slowtostart 05-09-16 03:41 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 18753503)
@slowtostart is referring to the pawl which has a pawl spring on it - you know, keeps the shift lever in desired gear.

A most perfect example of "woman speaks, woman translates"!

Vv, may I count on you in the future?

slowtostart 05-09-16 03:55 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 18753603)
@slowtostart: I assume Neal has come up with a replacement shifter....that pawl spring is replaceable but only if you take the entire shifter apart *and* have the requisite replacement pieces. For a 70s bike the shifters are readily available (usually only the plastic is broken....

Mark, yes, Neal has offered a replacement. The damage exceeds the plastic. The missing, snapped off metal, coincides with the broken plastic.

Anyone else experienced this shifter issue?

markk900 05-09-16 04:13 PM

Yes - I have one as well with the end of the pawl spring snapped off....but I also have a local shop with a box full of them if you don't mind scratched or cracked plastic....bought just the shifter for maybe $5....

dweenk 05-09-16 04:18 PM

This is not an English 3 speed, nor does it have a Sturmey Archer hub; but I have never seen a 3 speed hub with a coaster brake and the bell crank on the same side. Did Shimano do this?
Schwinn Collegiate Vintage 3 Speed Bike

noglider 05-09-16 04:20 PM

Yes, @dweenk, that's a Shimano hub, and not a very durable one.

gster 05-09-16 04:33 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18750665)
Now that wasn't so bad was it?:rolleyes:

Yeeeaaaahh!!

michaelz28 05-09-16 05:45 PM

page 420 ..

michaelz28 05-09-16 05:48 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18753756)
This is not an English 3 speed, nor does it have a Sturmey Archer hub; but I have never seen a 3 speed hub with a coaster brake and the bell crank on the same side. Did Shimano do this?
Schwinn Collegiate Vintage 3 Speed Bike

its not very vintage .. walmart bike . my 69 stingray uses a SA hub

gna 05-09-16 08:34 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18753756)
This is not an English 3 speed, nor does it have a Sturmey Archer hub; but I have never seen a 3 speed hub with a coaster brake and the bell crank on the same side. Did Shimano do this?
Schwinn Collegiate Vintage 3 Speed Bike


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 18753762)
Yes, @dweenk, that's a Shimano hub, and not a very durable one.

Those are from '83 or '84 and made for Schwinn by Giant, I believe. Not a Walmart bike. A Decent, lightweight lugged frame. I thought that was a decent Shimano hub, though.

agmetal 05-09-16 08:35 PM

Just got home from a 44ish mile ride up to Salem and back on my '37 Raleigh roadster, including a fair amount of gravel paths. I know I really shouldn't be surprised by this, and I suppose I'm not, but I'm really impressed by how well it handled the gravel parts! I also saw a '70s DL-1 locked up outside a bike shop in Salem (an employee told me it's owned by someone who works in an office above them and rides it every day). A friend in Salem took some great pictures of my bike, too, much better than the ones I've taken so far.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...55881394_n.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...61821411_n.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...54678185_n.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...30430133_n.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...21935950_n.jpg


Here are a few that I took along the ride:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...509_145245.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...509_145254.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...509_145519.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...509_145803.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v8...509_161712.jpg

3speedslow 05-09-16 08:51 PM

The bike and that path just look so awesome !

Velocivixen 05-09-16 11:32 PM

@agmetal - when you say "Salem" and I see you're in MA, I immediately think of witches. That bike seems like it would be home in Salem. It's very pretty.

We have a Salem in Oregon, but unfortunately there are no witches.

agmetal 05-09-16 11:42 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 18754698)
@agmetal - when you say "Salem" and I see you're in MA, I immediately think of witches. That bike seems like it would be home in Salem. It's very pretty.

We have a Salem in Oregon, but unfortunately there are no witches.

Yep, that's the one. I rode right past the Salem Witch Museum. I've been up there a few times, but have actually never had a chance to check that museum out.

BigChief 05-10-16 05:49 AM

It is surprising how well these roadsters handle unpaved and generally poor road surfaces. You would think, since they're so old fashioned, that they would be bone shakers on uneven surfaces. I think they ride just as well as the modern department store all purpose bikes on our rural, stoney, New England back roads.

DQRider 05-10-16 05:58 AM


Originally Posted by agmetal (Post 18754706)
Yep, that's the one. I rode right past the Salem Witch Museum. I've been up there a few times, but have actually never had a chance to check that museum out.

I am always impressed by how well these bikes age. If you can find one that hasn't been left outside to rust, they develop a patina like faded denim or well-worn leather. Your `37 is a prime example of this. As long as you keep them lubricated, they will virtually run forever. Definitely built to last. I can't think of any modern bicycles that fit that mold, other than maybe a Pashley. But then that's just a modern copy of your roadster anyway. Are there any other modern bikes that will stand the test of time like an old Raleigh?

agmetal 05-10-16 07:29 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18754937)
It is surprising how well these roadsters handle unpaved and generally poor road surfaces. You would think, since they're so old fashioned, that they would be bone shakers on uneven surfaces. I think they ride just as well as the modern department store all purpose bikes on our rural, stoney, New England back roads.

I don't find it surprising at all...I mean, think about it - you've got a bike that was used in rural pre-WWII England, and is still popular in the developing world. I can't imagine those areas had/have roads that are in great condition...

Salubrious 05-10-16 11:54 AM


Originally Posted by agmetal (Post 18754413)
Just got home from a 44ish mile ride up to Salem and back on my '37 Raleigh roadster, including a fair amount of gravel paths. I know I really shouldn't be surprised by this, and I suppose I'm not, but I'm really impressed by how well it handled the gravel parts!

FWIW, its arguable that the original design from which the DL-1 derives was the world's first mountain bike. Much of the 3rd world's mail was delivered on such machines, on single-track in the middle of nowhere (or at least so close, you could see it from there).

Take a close look at the images in the background on the home page of the Tour Divide site. They are 3-speed rod brake machines, apparently doing a bit of bikepacking.

Narsinha 05-10-16 12:18 PM

@agmetal: Beautiful bike, this shifter alone !


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