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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

gster 12-13-18 07:56 PM


Originally Posted by mtb_addict (Post 20702894)
Has anyone converted a Raliegh sport to "fixed gear" (like SA S3X hub)? I wonder how is it regarding pedal strikes?

Fixies are pure and simple racing bikes. A binary system,
on and off. Pedaling or stopping, nothing in between.
They are not suitable for everyday riding and are
not for novices . They are not forgiving.
They are a fad for the young and reckless, that has, thankfully, mostly passed.
I've said my piece and welcome any
counter arguments.

gster 12-13-18 07:59 PM

Looks like a nice, clean bike.
Saddle's worth $50.00 (to me).

clubman 12-13-18 08:06 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by mtb_addict (Post 20702894)
Has anyone converted a Raliegh sport to "fixed gear" (like SA S3X hub)? I wonder how is it regarding pedal strikes?

An SA S3X isn't a typical fixed gear. Still, fixed wheel Sports make for a funtional bike, especially with better rims and tires. This '57 has alloy rims and Dunlop EA1 higher pressure tires. Pedal strike will only happen at very low speeds when swerving around an object.

Ballenxj 12-13-18 08:37 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20703842)
They are a fad for the young and reckless, that has, thankfully, mostly passed.

Well, that leaves me out. Also explains why I see so many on Craigslist. I must admit I look at some of them with thoughts of turning them into internal geared hub bikes. :)
I know, I'm a sad case.

Buellster 12-13-18 09:11 PM

That franken gitane 3 speed I just picked up was being ridden as a single speed. Guy had no idea it could be anything else haha https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...95e1036ea2.jpg

BigChief 12-13-18 11:44 PM

I rode a fixie once. The feeling I got was similar to the time a friend let me ride his tank shift Harley. Went around the block once and was glad to get off and say I did that.

gster 12-14-18 06:05 AM


Originally Posted by Ballenxj (Post 20703890)
Well, that leaves me out. Also explains why I see so many on Craigslist. I must admit I look at some of them with thoughts of turning them into internal geared hub bikes. :)
I know, I'm a sad case.

I rode one for about 5 minutes in an empty parking lot 10 years ago.
I had some young (25) guys working with me who all had the "fixie bug".
They would come to work proudly displaying their various sustained injuries.
Eventually, three of them moved on to 3 speeds....

gster 12-15-18 10:38 AM

Clean Raleigh Folder
Listed at $120.00 here in Toronto.
Pump included!
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2bfff3089b.jpg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...11f6b9a090.jpg

clubman 12-15-18 12:34 PM

1 Attachment(s)
The 'fixie' craze did some unfortunate damage to the reputation of fixed wheel riding. I commuted a great deal on a couple of models into my mid forties until my knees complained too much.

A proper track bike is a wonderful thing, especially on a track. I found the riding position a little too low/aggressive for urban street rides so I converted a road Sakai to fixed and learned to love it. It takes some getting used to but Sheldon's praise isn't unfounded. It can be a beautiful, effortless form of riding. You really become 'one with the bike'

Fixed riding is also common in the pro peleton during early spring training. It tends to smooth out your pedal stroke, it forces you to spin circles. This 51 Raleigh Sports came stock with a flip/flop hub, the SA IGH was an option.

rhm 12-15-18 05:56 PM


Originally Posted by mtb_addict (Post 20705815)
the late Sheldon Brown wrote highly of fixed gear riding. i have a Formula Track FG hub on the shelf. so i am going to give it a try, and build a FG 26" wheel. it should be a simple drop into the frame. i will report back. if i like it i might get a S3x hub too. but its not cheap.

i highly recommend giving a fixed gear bike a try. Sheldon's remarks are on target. It's hard to explain... Somehow a fixed gear is the purest form of cycling. It's the bicycling equivalent of fresh water, black coffee, neat scotch.

When I ride a fixed gear bike, average speed goes up by almost a mile per hour (something like 14 mph to 15 mph). The fixed gear won't let you relax... but do you need to relax? You can relax when you get home. I'm not saying that as praise; but there it is.

I cannot give the S3X such high praise. It combines a fixed gear experience with a three speed experience, but somehow it misses the best aspect of both. It's both worlds, but it's not the best of both worlds.

Dan Burkhart 12-15-18 08:46 PM


Originally Posted by rhm (Post 20706267)
I cannot give the S3X such high praise. It combines a fixed gear experience with a three speed experience, but somehow it misses the best aspect of both. It's both worlds, but it's not the best of both worlds.

Perhaps not, but my S3X is what makes fixed gear riding doable for me.I don't know what your issues are, but what I hear from some committed fixie riders is that they simply do not like the gear lash which is amplified at the crank arms. Not a deal breaker for me, and I'll take a couple of lower ratios to help on the hills.

raleighroadster 12-15-18 09:10 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20705766)
Clean Raleigh Folder
Listed at $120.00 here in Toronto.
Pump included!
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2bfff3089b.jpg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...11f6b9a090.jpg

you are not saying $120 Canadian ? That is $90 usd!

gster 12-15-18 09:20 PM


Originally Posted by raleighroadster (Post 20706444)

you are not saying $120 Canadian ? That is $90 usd!

Correct.

raleighroadster 12-15-18 09:38 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20706451)
Correct.


wow, wish I were closer to Toronto . Only getting as far w as Albany on wed!

nlerner 12-16-18 12:02 PM

23" men's Sports in bronze green for small money in the Boston area:

https://boston.craigslist.org/bmw/bi...773449437.html

https://images.craigslist.org/01414_...8I_600x450.jpg

BigChief 12-16-18 02:07 PM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 20706981)

Boy, that's a good deal. 1966, 67, around there I think. Tall frame. Hard to see in the tiny pic, but it doesn't appear to be a rust bucket. Looks like a good one.

mirfi 12-16-18 07:16 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20706451)
Correct.

Nice

SirMike1983 12-16-18 07:44 PM

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-O7Mzp-7cc...214_121758.jpg

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ujS9qKPC9...214_121813.jpg

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-GQr0sRaIy...214_121840.jpg

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4tZdWAocD...214_121852.jpg

BigChief 12-16-18 09:53 PM

@SirMike1983 Brilliant. This bike turned out especially well. I do have a couple of questions. I also need to gear down these old roadsters a bit to be able to enjoy riding them. With my 51 Rudge, I chose to swap in a NOS 50s straight leg splined driver into the otherwise original hub. I see yours has a large cog. How did you handle the modification? Thank you for the closeup picture of the grip. By any chance, were these in place on the bike when you found it? If not, you did a heroic job of finding suitable replacements. To the best of my knowledge, these are very similar to what would have been on a 1930s rod braked roadster originally. Vintage handlebar grips are an exceedingly difficult subject to research. Apparently, the early natural rubber and celluloid grips were fragile compared to modern plastics and we don't have the benefit of many still existing examples to reference, so I'd like to know more about these.

markk900 12-17-18 06:12 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20707618)
With my 51 Rudge, I chose to swap in a NOS 50s straight leg splined driver into the otherwise original hub. I see yours has a large cog. How did you handle the modification?

@BigChief: I dropped a "circlip" style driver into the 49 Humber with no issues at all....later to solve a skipping issue in 1st gear (after replacing almost every part in that dang hub) I put the guts of a NOS 70s hub into the same shell and never looked back.

gster 12-17-18 08:11 PM

I think I'll stop buying bikes for awhile until I see one with a quadrant shifter.

SirMike1983 12-17-18 09:07 PM

The driver is a 1950s splined driver with its original 22 tooth cog on it. I do have a 22 tooth threaded cog and an original 1930s-40s threaded driver, but I prefer the splined type because it's easier to tinker with gear settings if I decide I want something other than 22.

The grips are Dover brand, but are of cardboard construction. The core is cardboard and they are coated with a layer of early plastic-type material. It's not a modern plastic - it's almost like a heavy Frabikoid type material. But the core structure is actually a heavy-duty cardboard. My guess is they're from the 1930s and are of a budget type. Celluloid-type and rubber grips are a little nicer, but these are pretty good for how old they are. The left grip is delaminating to a degree. I may be able to fix it with some clear epoxy though.

BigChief 12-18-18 06:00 AM

I think original style grips add a lot to the time machine effect of these bikes. They are so prominent, even as you ride. I'm building a research folder on the subject. Your information is an important addition. Thank you very much. When I get enough information to make it interesting, I'll post it here. I'm afraid it won't be very definitive, mostly images and speculation, but I hope by gathering what I can and putting it into one place it may be interesting and helpful.

Buellster 12-18-18 02:07 PM

lowest gear trouble on the 4 speed Frankenstein
 
So (predictibally) I'm having trouble getting into the lowest gear on my 4 speed. Hub went in great and installing bits and pieces wasnt too rough. It rides wonderfully! I have been able to tune it in so that I can get gears 2-4 but the spring mechanism on my shifter doesnt seem strong enough to push down and engage the notch for the lowest gear.
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2aba4fd1f3.jpg

Arrow pointing at spring (it's in 4th gear in this pic).
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3bd1b67504.jpg

Other end of springy bit.

If I push down on the plate under the spring with my finger or a screwdriver while it's in the low slot it locks in for a bit, but likes to slip out.
I've spotted a couple on Ebay and will also see if the person I bought this from has any others I could purchase(you never know till you use it if it works and he sold it to me for cheap so no complaints there).
If that doesnt work or isnt economical, I wonder if this would work.... New 4 speed sturmey archer shifter.
Or if anyone has suggestions on how to tighten that spring I'd be stoked. Haha
I dont know if the notches on the new model would line up with the same clicks of the older set up. Does anyone know?
It sure is fun, even when frustrating, working with this thing. It is turning our pretty well if I do day so. It doesnt have much on the beautiful machines you guys often put together, but it's not bad for a scorcher....https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6f48ebe123.jpg

BigChief 12-20-18 08:12 AM

To take apart the trigger, you'll need the correct punch, around 1/16" and a vise. You need to drift out the two main pins. These have short turned down ends that are press fit into the rear case wall. Once these are out, everything comes apart. As you slide the assembly out, be careful not to loose the two small pins that are loosely fit in the chromed trigger. Most times, the main pins will drift out without deforming the rear case wall, but it has happened that they were so tight that they made soft dimples. In that case, you need a steel bar or piece of hardwood that fits snugly into the case to use as an anvil to hammer it flat again. Reassembly is the tricky part. Here's the most important tip. While the case is empty, put the main pins in, line them up with the hole in the rear case wall and give them a push with your finger. You want them to start in a tiny bit. Enough to stick in place. If they don't, carefully stone or file the top of the pin to make a slight lead so it will. Also notice if one pin fits a hole better than the other and remember which is which as you reassemble. Once you have that done, you're ready to reassemble. First, you place the new or retensioned leaf spring in it's place in the case. Then you slide the pawl up underneath the spring and replace the main pin that holds it. Give the pin that push with your finger to locate it in it's press fit hole and drive it home. Then, you assemble the chrome trigger, the loose pins and the hardened cam plate. Pic below incase you forgot how to locate the parts. Then carefully slide this assembly (without loosing the loose fit pins) into the case, under the pawl. Now, since this assembly is under spring pressure, it's tricky to get the main pin aligned with the holes. First, with the face plate up, locate the pin through the face plate, front plate of the case and into it's hole in the cam plate. Then, flip it over and, while holding the case somehow, I like to use the edge of a table and my left hand and hold the chrome trigger with my right, try to line up the pin with the small hole in the rear case wall and give it a push with your finger until it sticks into place. Flip it over, drive the second pin home and you're done!
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...959b69de1e.jpg

Buellster 12-20-18 10:38 AM

Thanks! @BigChief
I've got those NOS leaf springs on the way but I think I'll see if I can get this one bent back into shape.
wish me luck!
I'm gonna need it.... haha

BigChief 12-20-18 12:13 PM

It's amazing what people come up with on eBay. I bought 6 of em. That says a lot about my roadster addiction. Here's a pic of this style shifter apart.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4434/...10cf8071_z.jpg
shift003 by Billy Bones, on Flickr

Salubrious 12-20-18 01:54 PM

^^ Always best to store the bike with the shifter in high.

Buellster 12-20-18 02:38 PM

Could you go into a little more detail on your method for removing the pins?
I picked up a metal punch and clamped down the trigger. I have tried for the better part of an hour to push these things through and it doesnt seem to be going anywhere...
good chance I'm missing something, or maybe I need more dedication haha
by drifting do you just mean punch it out with a hammer? Or am I driving it through with another tool?

fietsbob 12-20-18 02:48 PM

Newer over bar plastic B shifter works the new BSR hub , so much more effortlessly than the 90 era AW3 and steel trigger on this bike...

http://www.cyclofiend.com/working/im...-1IMGP0010.jpg


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