Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=181)
-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BigChief 01-12-20 05:42 PM


Originally Posted by arty dave (Post 21281284)
I did the same on an early 50's hub.
I'd been unable to remove the threaded cog while in place on the wheel, but it was easier to remove once it was out of the hub. I clamped a tool handle that fit into the slots of the driver into my vice, sat the driver on the tool handle, and then used a chain whip to remove the cog.

All these years of being an IG hub guy has left me without a chain whip tool. I put the unit in my parts stash and if I ever really need the dust cover I suppose I could try driving the cog off with a punch. One thing's for sure. I won't ever be using an 18T cog on that bike. With the heavy pre-high tensile frame, Brooks saddle,tool bag, pump, steel rims, Dyno hub and all the original sheet metal , it's too heavy for 48x18 gearing. At least for me it is.

jackbombay 01-12-20 06:01 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 21281469)
All these years of being an IG hub guy has left me without a chain whip tool. I put the unit in my parts stash and if I ever really need the dust cover I suppose I could try driving the cog off with a punch. One thing's for sure. I won't ever be using an 18T cog on that bike. With the heavy pre-high tensile frame, Brooks saddle,tool bag, pump, steel rims, Dyno hub and all the original sheet metal , it's too heavy for 48x18 gearing. At least for me it is.

Clamp the gear in a bench vice then put a screwdriver through the slots in the driver and spin it off?

BigChief 01-13-20 05:53 AM


Originally Posted by jackbombay (Post 21281504)
Clamp the gear in a bench vice then put a screwdriver through the slots in the driver and spin it off?

That should work. I suppose it would be good to get it apart without breaking anything. I always save parts, but who would ever want a threaded driver and 18T cog? You never know. I had that NOS straight leg driver and dust cover in my parts bin for years and ended up needing them. Never thought I would.

bluesteak 01-13-20 06:24 AM

I went to my shop and counted 8 bikes or wheels with threaded drivers. I know that free wheels come with English, French, or Italian threads. Are threaded cogs all interchangeable?

PeterLYoung 01-13-20 07:30 AM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21282076)
I went to my shop and counted 8 bikes or wheels with threaded drivers. I know that free wheels come with English, French, or Italian threads. Are threaded cogs all interchangeable?

English & Italian Freewheels are interchangeable but French are not compatible with English or Italian.

cszipper 01-13-20 09:05 AM


Originally Posted by brianhamp (Post 21277775)
I have a question for the Sturmey Archer people.... Did Sturmey Archer stop or slow down production in 1962 ? I have been looking for a AW hub (or any SA hub) dated 1962 but cannot seem to find any... Was it maybe an "Off Year" for them?

I believe that 1961 was the last year for the screw in left-hand ball cup on Sturmey hubs. Perhaps there was a decrease in production while the factory retooled.

-Carl

clubman 01-13-20 09:08 PM


Originally Posted by cszipper (Post 21282240)
I believe that 1961 was the last year for the screw in left-hand ball cup on Sturmey hubs. Perhaps there was a decrease in production while the factory retooled.

-Carl

It was a turbulent time, the beginning of the Tube Investments takeovers triggered a lot of changes. Dunlop, Moulton, Sturmey, and European racing created a fast changing marketplace.

elcraft 01-13-20 11:16 PM

Threaded drivers on AW ( and it's clones) is right hand threaded, matching English Freewheel and Bottom Bracket threading.

JohnDThompson 01-14-20 08:55 AM


Originally Posted by arty dave (Post 21281284)
I'd been unable to remove the threaded cog while in place on the wheel, but it was easier to remove once it was out of the hub.

AFAIK, that's the only way to remove the cog from the driver. Sturmey-Archer actually recommended replacing the threaded drivers with splined drivers once the splined driver became available.


I clamped a tool handle that fit into the slots of the driver into my vice, sat the driver on the tool handle, and then used a chain whip to remove the cog.
That's how I did it as well:

http://www.os2.dhs.org/~john/threaded-driver-fix.jpg

Salubrious 01-14-20 12:26 PM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 21280802)
I don't remove the nut on the cotter pin until the pin is moving, just crack the nut to start with and rotate a small amount applying the press until the nut is down to the crank then repeat. Once the pin is completely loose remove the nut and press the cotter pin out. This way the pin is supported by the nut and does not bend. Has worked every time for me.

And for me as well. I made that recommendation based on an already bent cotter pin.

thumpism 01-15-20 06:21 AM

Nice little bike. Between CL and antique shops a few like this have been available here lately.

https://richmond.craigslist.org/bik/...056302508.html

Womenís vintage 3 speed - $100 (Henrico)

https://images.craigslist.org/00707_...45_600x450.jpg

bicycle frame material: steel
bicycle type: cruiser
frame size: Medium
wheel size: 26 in
Vintage all original but the tires are new
Cool vintage cruiser
3 speed everything works as It should

PeterLYoung 01-15-20 10:24 AM

Sunbeam W3 Wayfarer No S48571 1949/50
 
I have now rebuilt this Sunbeam Wayfarer about which I posted earlier, Rather than post whole write up here it can be seen at: https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...-part-2-a.html

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e2624666f4.jpg
Completed Bike

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...c1438a14ca.jpg
Cockpit view.

arty dave 01-15-20 03:35 PM

Very nice rebuild, looks like it will be a satisfying ride. Favourite parts for me are the awesome flat north road bars, those cool centre-pull brakes - levers are nice too, and the saddle - I have one that is very similar (with 2 springs and not Terry's, can't remember the brand) that is very comfortable. It just needs a spiffy bell to complete

bluesteak 01-16-20 06:41 PM

1957 Hopper
 

Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 21275514)
Further to my earlier comments if it was 1957 date bike then it possibly could have been built for 27" (630) rims rather than the EA1 26" rims.
Probably be a good idea to check against another road bike frame bike frame to check fork lengths, checking my road bikes with 27" they measure 14.5" from hub centre to base of crown whereas my 26" bikes measure 14" so this may give you a clue to which wheel was originally fitted. Hope this helps

I have mostly given up on the ea1 rims. I scooped up a couple of 40 hole sun cr18 rims on eBay. Hopefully that was not a mistake. I picked up somewhere that 590ís are out of production.

I am unsure if the original bike had ea1 or ea3 wheels.

BigChief 01-17-20 04:18 AM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21287523)
I have mostly given up on the ea1 rims. I scooped up a couple of 40 hole sun cr18 rims on eBay. Hopefully that was not a mistake. I picked up somewhere that 590ís are out of production.

I am unsure if the original bike had ea1 or ea3 wheels.

I think 590 CR-18s are the best choice. The Sun Ringle website doesn't list 590s, so perhaps they are out of production. Harris Cyclery still has them for sale on their site, but it might be a good idea to pick up a couple 32H front rims while you can.

jamesj 01-17-20 10:20 AM

Needing to update my tires on my 1979 Brown Raleigh since they kendas have been on it since I bought it 2 years ago, they are now cracked and needing replacing. What do you all think I should get next?

Has anyone seen these?
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/roadsport/p/155765
on
eriks bikeshop I had asked and they said they are ISO 38-590.
https://www.eriksbikeshop.com/specia...3e3117/product

bluesteak 01-17-20 05:51 PM

are you saying your tires are 2 years old or donít you know how old they are?

I donít have experience with either.

adventurepdx 01-18-20 02:52 AM


Originally Posted by jamesj (Post 21288179)
Needing to update my tires on my 1979 Brown Raleigh since they kendas have been on it since I bought it 2 years ago, they are now cracked and needing replacing. What do you all think I should get next?

Has anyone seen these?
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/roadsport/p/155765t

No experience with those Specialized tires, though they look very "modern".
For price, aesthetics, and durability, I think Schwalbe Delta Cruisers can't be beat. Panaracer Col de la Vies are also swell, but since they are just a tad wider can cause some fit issues with old Raleighs.

BigChief 01-18-20 05:11 AM


Originally Posted by adventurepdx (Post 21289236)
No experience with those Specialized tires, though they look very "modern".
For price, aesthetics, and durability, I think Schwalbe Delta Cruisers can't be beat. Panaracer Col de la Vies are also swell, but since they are just a tad wider can cause some fit issues with old Raleighs.

I've been using Kendas without any problem for a while now. I like that they are plain black without any colored lettering or reflective strips. I have some that are well over 2 years old and I don't see any cracks in the sidewalls. I do wish they sold the brown version here in the US.

adventurepdx 01-19-20 01:05 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 21289264)
I've been using Kendas without any problem for a while now. I like that they are plain black without any colored lettering or reflective strips. I have some that are well over 2 years old and I don't see any cracks in the sidewalls. I do wish they sold the brown version here in the US.

Kendas can be okay, but it seems like their quality control on the 590 tires can vary a bit.Still, I got some good life out of the Kenda/Nimbus "hybrid" tires for this size.

I don't mind reflective stripes on my bikes, as they add some extra visibility for night riding.

bluesteak 01-20-20 11:43 AM

Brake pads
 
Some of my bikes still have possibly the original 60 plus year old brake pads. I have adjusted them and replaced some where I have to.

The original holders were obviously refillable. Does anyone make new blocks for them?

What should I be using that will provide safety, retain the right look, and wear well? Also, I have aluminum rims waiting for the Hopper project. How does that change things?
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1d3075b74.jpeg

FBOATSB 01-20-20 12:05 PM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21292123)
Some of my bikes still have possibly the original 60 plus year old brake pads. I have adjusted them and replaced some where I have to.

The original holders were obviously refillable. Does anyone make new blocks for them?

What should I be using that will provide safety, retain the right look, and wear well? Also, I have aluminum rims waiting for the Hopper project. How does that change things?
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1d3075b74.jpeg

I would say if you are changing to aluminum rims most definitely you should change to modern pads like kool stop. I'm keeping the original steel rims on my project and will be road testing the original '74 pads before deciding on replacements.

BigChief 01-20-20 04:41 PM

I like Kool Stop Continentals, but if you want a more traditional look Fibrax pads are still available. The new Fibrax are closed on both sides now so it doesn't matter which way they face and you can hold your bike at a stop on an uphill! Gotta love this modern technology.

gster 01-20-20 05:08 PM

Listed as a 1958
Looks good at $175.00 on Toronto Kijiji
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4959790196.png

markk900 01-20-20 06:20 PM

Oooo - Chrome socks on a roadster...

BigChief 01-20-20 07:23 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 21292722)
Oooo - Chrome socks on a roadster...

Yeah, Canadians got the cool Superbes with two tone paint and chrome socks. Different colors too. I think it's a Superbe. Is that an AG hub? Very nice. 58 looks right.

clubman 01-20-20 09:07 PM

...but don't forget we only rate vinyl Brooks saddles. Tit for tat.

Johno59 01-21-20 07:12 AM

Last chance saloon
 

Originally Posted by JohnDThompson (Post 21283686)
AFAIK, that's the only way to remove the cog from the driver. Sturmey-Archer actually recommended replacing the threaded drivers with splined drivers once the splined driver became available.



That's how I did it as well:

http://www.os2.dhs.org/~john/threaded-driver-fix.jpg

I've had rear sprockets that that were so stuck they would have destroyed any wrench/bar/ vise. The best option is to use a hack saw and cut diagonally thru the sprocket until just before u reach the thread of the driver. Put a pipe wrench so the trailing jaw grips the first tooth beyond your cut. With moderate force the sprocket cracks and peels off the thread.
Needless to say the sprocket is toast.
Heat , surprisingly, makes no difference in my experience.

gster 01-21-20 10:02 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 21292816)
Yeah, Canadians got the cool Superbes with two tone paint and chrome socks. Different colors too. I think it's a Superbe. Is that an AG hub? Very nice. 58 looks right.

Yes, listed as a Superbe and yes, rear Dynohub.

BigChief 01-22-20 05:32 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21293530)
Yes, listed as a Superbe and yes, rear Dynohub.

I didn't know the Canadian Superbes didn't come with Brooks saddles. Odd that they would add all those premium features and then spoil it with a clumsy saddle. Still, that is a good looking bike.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:14 PM.


Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.