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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Midnite 02-01-19 02:51 AM

wow thats great

gster 02-01-19 05:49 AM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 20773917)
Flattened??

Parallel to the ground rather that standing up on the bars.

BigChief 02-01-19 06:25 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20774086)
Parallel to the ground rather that standing up on the bars.

I generally set mine up that way too. I can reach the trigger with my forefinger while my hand is still at the grip. The longer window shifters lend themselves better to this position than the shorter through body bolt style though.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...877914a556.jpg

gster 02-01-19 06:37 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20774106)
I generally set mine up that way too. I can reach the trigger with my forefinger while my hand is still at the grip. The longer window shifters lend themselves better to this position than the shorter through body bolt style though.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...877914a556.jpg

Less wind resistance as well........

browngw 02-01-19 10:20 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20773416)
Wow! That is one beautiful roadster. Computer images can be deceiving, but that looks to be burgundy. The 72 catalog doesn't mention that color. Then again, it shows the top tube cable routing and self adjust levers too. Can't always depend on catalogs with Raleighs.

Thanks BigChief! I will post a couple of more pics and hope the color comes through better. Glad you brought up the Catalog issue. Virtually all the catalog information I find on line is for the USA line of products which most of the time differs from bikes imported to Canada. This particular bike was sold in Canada by Briscoes Sporting Goods and Hardware a store that grew through the 50s, 60s and seventies in Long Branch (Missisauga). I purchased it with original cables, brakes and tires although it looked like the grips had been replaced. The original saddle was a Brooks vinyl mattress style in very good condition. I replaced it a newish B67 I had purchased on sale. Perhaps some of my fellow Canadians know of a source of Canadian sales information. @gster , I will try it "flattened" lol. I usually put them "up" to prevent damage in fallover incidents. Incidentally, the cables and clips are identical to my 71/72 Robin Hood, also a made in England product for the Canadian market. It gets even more confusing after circa 1973 when Raleighs were produced in Canada.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e7fe1b04e4.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b47700de7a.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...dc5b5f7c99.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5e23cd7f25.jpg
Colour touch-up was done with a mix of "Profoundly Purple" and "Copper Pot" nail polish followed by "High Gloss" top coat. I could not find a paint even remotely close although I believe it was featured on some 72 Jeep Wagoneers!

gster 02-01-19 10:43 AM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 20774409)
Thanks BigChief! I will post a couple of more pics and hope the color comes through better. Glad you brought up the Catalog issue. Virtually all the catalog information I find on line is for the USA line of products which most of the time differs from bikes imported to Canada. This particular bike was sold in Canada by Briscoes Sporting Goods and Hardware a store that grew through the 50s, 60s and seventies in Long Branch (Missisauga). I purchased it with original cables, brakes and tires although it looked like the grips had been replaced. The original saddle was a Brooks vinyl mattress style in very good condition. I replaced it a newish B67 I had purchased on sale. Perhaps some of my fellow Canadians know of a source of Canadian sales information. @gster , I will try it "flattened" lol. I usually put them "up" to prevent damage in fallover incidents. Incidentally, the cables and clips are identical to my 71/72 Robin Hood, also a made in England product for the Canadian market. It gets even more confusing after circa 1973 when Raleighs were produced in Canada.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e7fe1b04e4.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b47700de7a.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...dc5b5f7c99.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5e23cd7f25.jpg
Colour touch-up was done with a mix of "Profoundly Purple" and "Copper Pot" nail polish followed by "High Gloss" top coat. I could not find a paint even remotely close although I believe it was featured on some 72 Jeep Wagoneers!

That bike should be in a museum.
We've got a carp shop on Brown's Line next door to the old Raleigh offices/factory.

BigChief 02-01-19 12:25 PM

Ah yes. I can see it's coffee now. Touching up those 70s colors seems like it would be tricky. I've never tried it. Not sure if there's metal flakes in the paint or if it's a candy type with a metallic undercoat. Beautiful bike. At some point in the 70s, Raleigh stopped using the Brooks B72 saddles on the US model Sports too. I prefer the B66 anyway. This B67 looks to be the same as a B66 except for the single rail.

markk900 02-01-19 12:37 PM

I did an almost completely original root beer (or perhaps itís called coffee) ladies bike (a little later - maybe 1974) for my sister - came from an estate and had been hardly ridden - original vinyl bag, mileage counter, etc. The paint cleaned up amazingly well and in the sun is one of my favorite Raleigh colours.

clubman 02-01-19 01:05 PM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 20774409)
Perhaps some of my fellow Canadians know of a source of Canadian sales information.

I have a 1965 catalogue/price list from the Merchants Trading Limited, who appears to have owned Canadian distribution rights. The early to mid 60's were a strange time when they 'Canadianized' most of the 3 speeds models as Laurentians, Mounties, Canadians, Space Riders, Colts and Explorers and offered a different range of colours and equipment. You couldn't buy a Sports but you could buy a Superbe...in black, red or blue. I'll scan it when I find it.

By the 70's, everything had reverted to typical Raleigh models, names, colours and equipment but I can't find any documentation.

BigChief 02-01-19 02:37 PM

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...de7d760036.jpg

Chr0m0ly 02-01-19 05:11 PM

I'm interested in finding something like these bikes, for utility use, foul weather, errands, pub ride, etc. But from what I can tell they are mostly hi-tension steel, and not butted?
Are there any three (or four or five speeds) with higher end frames? Butted Mangy-molly would be fine, I know these are utility cycles, but something a touch lighter would've nice!

Barring that, I'm conciderering IGH-ifying a nicer frame, and If I go that route what sort of geometry would work best? I have an '84 Trek 520 I think would work well in this role, I would think a mid-level touring frame would be a good choice, am I wrong? Are there better choices?

Thanks!

BigChief 02-01-19 06:29 PM


Originally Posted by Chr0m0ly (Post 20775100)
I'm interested in finding something like these bikes, for utility use, foul weather, errands, pub ride, etc. But from what I can tell they are mostly hi-tension steel, and not butted?
Are there any three (or four or five speeds) with higher end frames? Butted Mangy-molly would be fine, I know these are utility cycles, but something a touch lighter would've nice!

Barring that, I'm conciderering IGH-ifying a nicer frame, and If I go that route what sort of geometry would work best? I have an '84 Trek 520 I think would work well in this role, I would think a mid-level touring frame would be a good choice, am I wrong? Are there better choices?

Thanks!

There have been some really nice IGH roadsters built from higher end frames posted here on this thread. I've been thinking of a roadster based on a Super Course frame for a while now. Might get to it someday.

clubman 02-01-19 06:32 PM

You can convert most frames, keeping in mind that vintage Sturmey hubs are usually made for 110 OLD and commonly 40 holes (36 can be found.) A 120 OLD is totally doable. Newer IGH's are available to fit modern frames with a range of lacing options.
@nlerner had a lovely PX10 out and about not long ago.

gster 02-02-19 07:18 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20774742)
I have a 1965 catalogue/price list from the Merchants Trading Limited, who appears to have owned Canadian distribution rights. The early to mid 60's were a strange time when they 'Canadianized' most of the 3 speeds models as Laurentians, Mounties, Canadians, Space Riders, Colts and Explorers and offered a different range of colours and equipment. You couldn't buy a Sports but you could buy a Superbe...in black, red or blue. I'll scan it when I find it.

By the 70's, everything had reverted to typical Raleigh models, names, colours and equipment but I can't find any documentation.

It would be nice to see some of those pages if you have the time to scan.
I have a blue (with white trim) 1960/61 Superbe that I assume is a Canadian model.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1d9c544c21.jpg

nlerner 02-02-19 07:23 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20775194)
You can convert most frames, keeping in mind that vintage Sturmey hubs are usually made for 110 OLD and commonly 40 holes (36 can be found.) A 120 OLD is totally doable. Newer IGH's are available to fit modern frames with a range of lacing options.
@nlerner had a lovely PX10 out and about not long ago.

See https://www.bikeforums.net/20755686-post19081.html.

markk900 02-02-19 08:39 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20775194)
You can convert most frames, keeping in mind that vintage Sturmey hubs are usually made for 110 OLD and commonly 40 holes (36 can be found.) A 120 OLD is totally doable. Newer IGH's are available to fit modern frames with a range of lacing options.
@nlerner had a lovely PX10 out and about not long ago.

I built up a set of 700C wheels with a 36H AW, and they are currently mounted in my 1983 Trek 600 - always wanted to try a nice 531 frame with a 3-speed. Was an easy installation and I also built a 700C wheel with a 6-speed freewheel so I can swap around - takes about an hour to go from one to the other.

paulb_in_bkln 02-02-19 10:11 AM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20775764)
I built up a set of 700C wheels with a 36H AW, and they are currently mounted in my 1983 Trek 600 - always wanted to try a nice 531 frame with a 3-speed. Was an easy installation and I also built a 700C wheel with a 6-speed freewheel so I can swap around - takes about an hour to go from one to the other.

Good on you! I have the same Trek in red with the silver trim (also converted to 700c before a U-Ro-Peen bike tour long ago) which because there's some damage to the main tubes isn't worth any $$ but it still rides well. I positively relate to what you've done because what a nice lively feel with that DB 531 (main tubes only, not fork or stays). I believe it's an exaggeration to say, as some do, that it's just the choice of tires that creates a bike's feel. Sometimes, for the sake of nostalgia, I think of having the frame repaired and AW'd but with a repaint and replica decals to the original standard it just seems too expensive for what was a good but not outstanding bike at the time. Although I don't think enough good things can be said about the aesthetics of that lugged frame. Maybe someday.

clubman 02-02-19 01:14 PM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20775892)
I believe it's an exaggeration to say, as some do, that it's just the choice of tires that creates a bike's feel.

Agreed but I think it's still true that upgrading tires gives you the greatest improvement in ride quality with the least expense.

Mind you todays high end tires are getting ridiculously expensive.

paulb_in_bkln 02-03-19 08:25 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20776110)
Agreed but I think it's still true that upgrading tires gives you the greatest improvement in ride quality with the least expense.

Mind you todays high end tires are getting ridiculously expensive.

Col de la Vie? No experience yet myself but seem like they might have a lively feel without demanding crazy $$. The commuters with multi-layer belts etc for puncture resistance like the Schwalbe Marathon line get expensive. The Rudge I've been riding a lot lately came with some light Kendas similar to original equipment and yet so far no flats, which is startling considering the state of NYC streets and also that on other bikes I've had horrible luck with Kendas. I've been getting away with something.

One thought for my old Trek; maybe have it repaired (top and downtube need replacement) and painted satin black, no decals. OK so it doesn't shout "I'm a vintage Trek!" but it takes the bike to like-new functional condition without OTT spending, maybe.

gster 02-03-19 08:52 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20776954)
Col de la Vie? No experience yet myself but seem like they might have a lively feel without demanding crazy $$. The commuters with multi-layer belts etc for puncture resistance like the Schwalbe Marathon line get expensive. The Rudge I've been riding a lot lately came with some light Kendas similar to original equipment and yet so far no flats, which is startling considering the state of NYC streets and also that on other bikes I've had horrible luck with Kendas. I've been getting away with something.

One thought for my old Trek; maybe have it repaired (top and downtube need replacement) and painted satin black, no decals. OK so it doesn't shout "I'm a vintage Trek!" but it takes the bike to like-new functional condition without OTT spending, maybe.

I've using these tires on my bikes and I quite like them.
Good price @ $18.00/tire
Nice tread pattern
Good ride
No flats (yet)
All black w/small logo
The REAL problem these days is inner tubes that slowly (sometimes quickly) leak air.
I've got original Dunlop tubes from the 50's that are tighter than the new ones.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...894753446b.jpg

paulb_in_bkln 02-03-19 08:59 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20776978)
I've using these tires on my bikes and I quite like them.
Good price @ $18.00/tire
Nice tread pattern
Good ride
No flats (yet)
All black w/small logo
The REAL problem these days is inner tubes that slowly (sometimes quickly) leak air.
I've got original Dunlop tubes from the 50's that are tighter than the new ones.

$18! That is good. Maybe the older inner tubes use thicker rubber?

gster 02-03-19 09:00 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20776991)
$18! That is good. Maybe the older inner tubes use thicker rubber?

Probably REAL rubber.

gster 02-03-19 09:04 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20776993)
Probably REAL rubber.

Like these Raleigh grips that seem to last forever and maintain their softness.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2cde6070b7.jpg

markk900 02-03-19 09:43 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20776954)
Col de la Vie? No experience yet myself but seem like they might have a lively feel without demanding crazy $$. The commuters with multi-layer belts etc for puncture resistance like the Schwalbe Marathon line get expensive. The Rudge I've been riding a lot lately came with some light Kendas similar to original equipment and yet so far no flats, which is startling considering the state of NYC streets and also that on other bikes I've had horrible luck with Kendas. I've been getting away with something.

One thought for my old Trek; maybe have it repaired (top and downtube need replacement) and painted satin black, no decals. OK so it doesn't shout "I'm a vintage Trek!" but it takes the bike to like-new functional condition without OTT spending, maybe.

The Col de la Vie tires are by no means cheap (at least in Canada), and are slightly larger section than most of the original tires for these bikes. I have a set on the Humber and they ride very nicely but I don't find them "fast".

OT: how bad is the damage on the Trek? Unless unsafe why not throw a sticker over the dent and go ahead and build an IGH?

paulb_in_bkln 02-03-19 10:31 AM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20777044)
OT: how bad is the damage on the Trek? Unless unsafe why not throw a sticker over the dent and go ahead and build an IGH?

The bike is safe but the damage is conspicuous and not cover-up-able. I have thought of what you said, but the Trek has been useful to me as a derailleur bike. Plus, ahead of it project-wise is the cotterless cranking and AW-ing a salvaged mid-70s Peugeot mixte that while the finish is awful is straight and undinged. I finally got back my built 700c wheels (CR18s) after a long wait (two years almost!) and unfortunately some harsh words. I have not been able to locate a cotterless spindle that fits the old French BB, so will probably wind up shelling out for the Velo Orange BB, once I figure out the spindle length I need. I am so much better at making plans than at carrying them out.


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