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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

auchencrow 06-05-11 06:13 PM


Originally Posted by Carl Brill (Post 12744023)
auchencrow, I saw on a repro of a '37 or '38 Rahleigh catalog that they offered white steel fenders as well as the Bluemels. My GA came with them and they seem to be original to the bike.

Thank you Carl
- I looked and found the option for white steel fenders on the Golden Arrow called out on the catalog page that Neal originally posted (below).
My steel fenders are not white however - the finish on them and the faded gold pin striping is such a good match for the frame that I thought they were original, but nowhere have I seen a catalog reference (or a picture of another surviving example) with black fenders.

http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/h...oldenArrow.jpg

Singlespeed92 06-05-11 10:41 PM


Originally Posted by auchencrow (Post 12742358)
Singlespeed92- Your aim is admirable - but be advised that it's a slippery slope. Once you take the first step, you already have reached the point of no return.
I've owned tons of bike but never an English 3-speed, until very recently, and now, I suddenly have three!

LMBO!!! BeLIEVE me,this I know,I've had (and still have at least 5) old bike projects :twitchy::lol:

cazoo 06-06-11 11:45 AM

Raleigh Light Bracket?
 
I had a question about installing a front headlight on my Raleigh Sports. My bike didn't come with the standard Raleigh light bracket.
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/...ht_bracket.jpg

Do these vintage brackets work with modern headlights like the Soma Bullet?

auchencrow 06-06-11 11:48 AM

What do you do for brakes on the old Raleigh 3-speeds?

I got the rust off my side-pull Raleigh steel calipers, reassembled them, and was re-cabling the bike today: I overcame the first hurdle, and got the knarp and cable to stay centered on the guide loop on the caliper arm.

Centering the caliper arms was another story entirely: The rear especially, was impossible, because every time I so much as snugged the nut at the brake bridge, the caliper arms bound up hard on each other. :notamused:

auchencrow 06-06-11 11:52 AM


Originally Posted by cazoo (Post 12747784)
I had a question about installing a front headlight on my Raleigh Sports. My bike didn't come with the standard Raleigh light bracket.
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/...ht_bracket.jpg

Do these vintage brackets work with modern headlights like the Soma Bullet?

The old lights had a c-shaped bracket to slip over the herons' head.
The Soma lamp is purported to mount on the fork or bars as shown.

http://www.somafab.com/lt_torpedo475.jpg

sykerocker 06-06-11 12:10 PM


Originally Posted by Amesja (Post 12742507)
I can imagine making a SCA suit of chainmail out of old bicycle chains. I'd be heavy though...

And the marshals wouldn't pass it on the field. And if they did, I'm sure the heralds would have some kind of kitten-snit problem.

JohnDThompson 06-06-11 12:14 PM


Originally Posted by cazoo (Post 12747784)
I had a question about installing a front headlight on my Raleigh Sports. My bike didn't come with the standard Raleigh light bracket.
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/...ht_bracket.jpg

Do these vintage brackets work with modern headlights like the Soma Bullet?

Only if you fit the specific mounting hardware onto the lamp:

http://www.os2.dhs.org/~john/sa_light_clamp.jpg

nlerner 06-06-11 12:54 PM


Originally Posted by auchencrow (Post 12747796)
Centering the caliper arms was another story entirely: The rear especially, was impossible, because every time I so much as snugged the nut at the brake bridge, the caliper arms bound up hard on each other. :notamused:

Three words: hammer and punch.

Neal

cobrabyte 06-06-11 01:08 PM

1973 Raleigh Sports
 
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2380/...1a7cede7_b.jpg
1973/74 Raleigh Sports by (cobrabyte), on Flickr

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2200/...954ec9e6_b.jpg
1973/74 Raleigh Sports by (cobrabyte), on Flickr

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5226/...d6e5f3585e.jpg
1973/74 Raleigh Sports by (cobrabyte), on Flickr

sort of a frankenbike really, but all parts are from '72,'73,'74 Sports models, so it's mostly correct.

more here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cobraby...th/5804826135/

cazoo 06-06-11 01:23 PM


Originally Posted by JohnDThompson (Post 12747912)
Only if you fit the specific mounting hardware onto the lamp:

http://www.os2.dhs.org/~john/sa_light_clamp.jpg

I see. Looks like I'll just use whatever bracket the light comes with.

noglider 06-06-11 01:25 PM

cazoo, welcome.

folderfan550 06-07-11 04:40 PM

1 Attachment(s)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=205240What type of threading did Raleigh use for the handlebar, stem and seatpost bolts on Sports, etc.? The brown Raleigh Twenty was missing its seatpost clamp bolt and handle. I found the proper handle but the bolt I got with it is too short so I need to find a longer bolt. When I obtained the bolt and handle, I did not know that Raleigh had used a couple of different style clamps. The blue bike takes the shorter bolt.

ftwelder 06-07-11 04:48 PM


Originally Posted by cobrabyte (Post 12748190)

Awesome Sports! And tree!

cazoo 06-07-11 07:22 PM

That vintage flashlight is pretty cool looking!

noglider 06-07-11 08:33 PM

Looks like a banyan tree. I've seen a couple in Florida. They're amazing.

gna 06-07-11 09:08 PM


Originally Posted by cobrabyte (Post 12748190)

sort of a frankenbike really, but all parts are from '72,'73,'74 Sports models, so it's mostly correct.

Just like the Raleigh Factory.

rhm 06-07-11 09:29 PM


Originally Posted by auchencrow (Post 12747796)
Centering the caliper arms was another story entirely: The rear especially, was impossible, because every time I so much as snugged the nut at the brake bridge, the caliper arms bound up hard on each other. :notamused:

The front of the brake should have a nut and a locknut, which have to be tightened against each other at exactly the right level of tightness, kinda like cones on a hub or something. Typically you have to tighten them both down, then loosen the locknut so it tightens up against the acorn nut, and then lock the two against each other. Once you have that adjustment right, loosen the nut on the back, and center the brake as well as you can, and tighten it up enough so it's not going anywhere. Now test the brake. If it's gone off center, now's the time to take Neal's advice. Put the punch on the very top of the spring, so you're not hammering on the spring but really on the side of the piece that holds the spring. Now, if you hit the punch with a hammer, you'll be turning the whole brake bolt a little bit. Once you have it right, tighten up that nut on the back.

auchencrow 06-07-11 10:47 PM


Originally Posted by rhm (Post 12755597)
The front of the brake should have a nut and a locknut, which have to be tightened against each other at exactly the right level of tightness, kinda like cones on a hub or something. Typically you have to tighten them both down, then loosen the locknut so it tightens up against the acorn nut, and then lock the two against each other. Once you have that adjustment right, loosen the nut on the back, and center the brake as well as you can, and tighten it up enough so it's not going anywhere. Now test the brake. If it's gone off center, now's the time to take Neal's advice. Put the punch on the very top of the spring, so you're not hammering on the spring but really on the side of the piece that holds the spring. Now, if you hit the punch with a hammer, you'll be turning the whole brake bolt a little bit. Once you have it right, tighten up that nut on the back.

Thanks RHM, but I think I have a slightly different situation...

- Here's a (pre-clean-up) picture: It does not have the usual hex nut arrangement common on most side pull calipers as described - rather just a large slot head screw - but even that is not the issue. The difficulty comes in because the spring is not sufficiently robust to overcome the friction between the caliper arms at the single pivot, despite that they are now rust free and lubed.

(I'm thinking of stopping it at the hardware store tomorrow, to see if they have any thin Teflon washers to insert between the pivots.)

http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/h...rts-1953_a.jpg

auchencrow 06-07-11 10:49 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 12755296)
Looks like a banyan tree. I've seen a couple in Florida. They're amazing.

When you see those trees you know you're not in Kansas anymore.
http://pigeonhaspants.com/wordpress/...04/oz-tree.jpg

Sixty Fiver 06-07-11 11:05 PM


Originally Posted by auchencrow (Post 12755911)
Thanks RHM, but I think I have a slightly different situation...

- Here's a (pre-clean-up) picture: It does not have the usual hex nut arrangement common on most side pull calipers as described - rather just a large slot head screw - but even that is not the issue. The difficulty comes in because the spring is not sufficiently robust to overcome the friction between the caliper arms at the single pivot, despite that they are now rust free and lubed.

(I'm thinking of stopping it at the hardware store tomorrow, to see if they have any thin Teflon washers to insert between the pivots.)

There should be little to no friction between the arms and the action should be rather light on these brakes... put a spanner on the nut and back the screw out just a little to see if that helps.

wahoonc 06-08-11 04:50 AM


Originally Posted by folderfan550 (Post 12754310)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=205240What type of threading did Raleigh use for the handlebar, stem and seatpost bolts on Sports, etc.? The brown Raleigh Twenty was missing its seatpost clamp bolt and handle. I found the proper handle but the bolt I got with it is too short so I need to find a longer bolt. When I obtained the bolt and handle, I did not know that Raleigh had used a couple of different style clamps. The blue bike takes the shorter bolt.

AFAIK the Sports used the Raleigh proprietary 26tpi. The Twenty is different on some of the lever release stuff. I would have to check. I know that the lever and bolt for the frame release is 3/8" coarse thread (16tpi IIRC).

Aaron :)

nlerner 06-08-11 06:38 AM


Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 12755957)
There should be little to no friction between the arms and the action should be rather light on these brakes... put a spanner on the nut and back the screw out just a little to see if that helps.

My usual approach is to use a large screwdriver for that exterior slot in the brake bolt and a wrench to hold the fixing nut. I tighten with the screwdriver and hold the nut until it's a bit too tight--I squeeze the calipers and they don't bounce back. Then, I back off with the screwdriver until the brakes spring back freely. Then, I use the hammer and punch method to center.

Neal

cobrabyte 06-08-11 08:30 AM

@ ftwelder: thanks! :)

@ noglider: very good guess :) , but it is actually a moreton bay fig tree, these trees have huge roots that grow in a wavy formation above the ground. A banyon tree has roots that grow down from the branches until they reach the ground and dig in...more like the pic below: (and yes, they are amazing, they can grow to be HUGE, enough to where you can walk through one tree and it feels like a forest.)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/56/15...51e60e5ba7.jpg
Banyan Tree in Hawaii by BillyCrafton, on Flickr

@ cazoo: thanks! but it is actually a modern led flashlight I picked up at the local flea market, but I do have a small collection of vintage flashlights...this one is just brighter

@ gna: cool! did not know that

cobrabyte 06-08-11 08:35 AM

[QUOTE=auchencrow;12742677]
http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/h...rowproject.jpg


very, very cool project

Mike Mills 06-08-11 09:39 AM

These kinds of brake adjustment difficulties are what separate a great brakeset from the run of the mill.


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