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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Salubrious 11-20-13 10:01 PM


Originally Posted by iphthime (Post 16264259)
Hi all,

I've been lurking for a while but this is my first time posting. I have recently picked up a 1973 Raleigh LTD-3 (which thanks to you all, I figured out was a variant of the Raleigh Lady Sports) and I would like to replace the front wheel with an alloy wheel without altering the fork. There seems to be one wheel available from a UK seller on ebay, "bankrupt_bike_parts":

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/26-x-1-3-8.../181261095361?

Is this a good idea? Does anyone have experience with this wheel? Including their estimate for US shipping, I think the total will be close to US $100. Thanks!

ETA: Does anyone know of a US source for a wheel like this?

You can get the Sun CR-18 rim in 32, 36 and 40 holes in the 26" size. If it were me I would take apart your existing wheel and use the original hub with new spokes and the CR-18. That would work out well, and less than $100 if you could do the wheel yourself. FWIW its not that hard, and in the process you would learn wheel alignment, and essential skill if you own bikes with spokes.

iphthime 11-20-13 10:54 PM

Thanks - I'm reluctant to destroy the original wheel, even though it's not in great shape (rides and rolls OK, but the chrome is flaking off the rim). The original tire seems to still be on it and I like the idea of being able to reverse any changes even though I know these bikes aren't rare or valuable. Also, if the upgrade doesn't work out then I've still got a working wheel to fall back on!


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 16264660)
You can get the Sun CR-18 rim in 32, 36 and 40 holes in the 26" size. If it were me I would take apart your existing wheel and use the original hub with new spokes and the CR-18. That would work out well, and less than $100 if you could do the wheel yourself. FWIW its not that hard, and in the process you would learn wheel alignment, and essential skill if you own bikes with spokes.


Gasbag 11-21-13 12:02 AM


Originally Posted by iphthime (Post 16264259)
Hi all,

I've been lurking for a while but this is my first time posting. I have recently picked up a 1973 Raleigh LTD-3 (which thanks to you all, I figured out was a variant of the Raleigh Lady Sports) and I would like to replace the front wheel with an alloy wheel without altering the fork. There seems to be one wheel available from a UK seller on ebay, "bankrupt_bike_parts":

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/26-x-1-3-8.../181261095361?

Is this a good idea? Does anyone have experience with this wheel? Including their estimate for US shipping, I think the total will be close to US $100. Thanks!

ETA: Does anyone know of a US source for a wheel like this?

$55 at Harris Cyclery http://harriscyclery.net/product-lis...-x-1-3-8-1437/

oldroads 11-21-13 05:50 AM


Originally Posted by auchencrow (Post 16264421)
+1

+2

Velognome 11-21-13 05:56 AM


Originally Posted by oldroads (Post 16265130)
+2

+3 PITA to follow

iphthime 11-21-13 08:50 AM

Thanks but unfortunately for the Harris wheel,
"Note: This wheel will only fit forks with standard 100mm width."
and mine is closer to 90mm.

(see also http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/in.../t-664604.html)


Originally Posted by Gasbag (Post 16264913)


Salubrious 11-21-13 10:55 AM


Originally Posted by Velognome (Post 16265137)
+3 PITA to follow

+4 not the least of which you have to deal with Facebook nonsense if you want to look at something on Facebook. Not a fan.


Originally Posted by iphthime (Post 16265400)
Thanks but unfortunately for the Harris wheel,
"Note: This wheel will only fit forks with standard 100mm width."
and mine is closer to 90mm.

(see also http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/in.../t-664604.html)

Yes- I looked at the Harris link and it does not seem to be addressing the front wheel of a British three speed. That is why you harvest the original hub and build up a new wheel. I've done this a lot- no worries. That Sun CR18 with new stainless spokes will likely last another 50 years...

I have to admit that I struggle with this original vs updated thing all the time. Oddly, especially on the three speeds, which often are not worth all that much. But I am OK with the new alloy rims simply because of the functionality, which is of course the point with a three speed- they are intended to be as durable as possible and the simple fact is that steel rims don't hold up to the road as well as alloy rims. Anyone who does wheel alignments knows that in spades. A steel rim might have to be aligned a couple of times a year if you ride a lot; if alloy maybe once a decade if it was built right to begin with.

SirMike1983 11-21-13 09:33 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 16265795)
+4 not the least of which you have to deal with Facebook nonsense if you want to look at something on Facebook. Not a fan.

+5 Well said, Salubrious and Clubman.

arex 11-24-13 01:15 PM

I tore down my Raleigh frame yesterday, to rebuild the bottom bracket and headset. Took some work, but they cleaned up well. The headset bearing races were nothing I've seen before, very well thought out.

Salubrious 11-24-13 02:47 PM

The bearings for the headset are a bit of a trick. They are 5/32" if you need any. These days its easiest to get them off of Ebay. You can buy a bag of 100 for about $6-$7.

sykerocker 11-25-13 07:51 PM

Haven't been posting much lately due to Maggie and I putting my life back together after Patti's funeral. However, I have been in the shop and its been three-speed-city for the past few months. First off, I finally got myself one of two bikes that I've wanted for quite a few years, a '73 Raleigh Tourist:

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps94ea5884.jpg

Meanwhile, Maggie's taken up with riding with me and after a few frustrating sessions with derailleur bikes (I supposed it didn't help that the first try was a Raleigh Sprite 10 with the original Huret Allvit), she's definitely taken well to the three-speed roadster. While I was finding something for her, she was riding my Ranger. Then some local dropped off a '68 Schwinn Breeze that was in rather pathetic shape (not worth fixing up to sell), but with some work was put in rideable shape for her:

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q...pscbbdb1f6.jpg

And just about the time I got it on the road, Poguemahone gives us a '74 Raleigh Sports that had a slightly bent fork. Got my big, shiny Park tool out, and after about ten minutes the fork was back to original geometry. The rest of the bike, except for the bars, was in rather good condition under all that crud, so I was able to restore that one to original:

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q...psc429d484.jpg

I'll just be keeping my eye out for another set of bars in better cosmetic condition, otherwise its done and is now Maggie's daily commuter to her job.

That's five three speeds (counting my Ranger and the Raleigh Twenty) now. If I can just find a nice Sports men's 23-1/2" frame to add to the collection, I'll be set for life.

choteau 11-27-13 10:03 AM

Good work on the bikes and they look sharp (even the Schwinn). I found that my Phillips roadster was a labor of sorts well worth the time and $ spent to get er done. I tend to work thru stuff better when fiddling with or riding my bikes. Tim

arex 11-27-13 10:36 AM


Originally Posted by sykerocker (Post 16278173)
Got my big, shiny Park tool out, and after about ten minutes the fork was back to original geometry.

What tool is that? I'm interested because I'm going to have to cold-set my fork a bit, and anything that'll help me keep things straight will be well-appreciated.

gna 11-27-13 10:37 AM


Originally Posted by iphthime (Post 16264259)
Hi all,

I've been lurking for a while but this is my first time posting. I have recently picked up a 1973 Raleigh LTD-3 (which thanks to you all, I figured out was a variant of the Raleigh Lady Sports) and I would like to replace the front wheel with an alloy wheel without altering the fork. There seems to be one wheel available from a UK seller on ebay, "bankrupt_bike_parts":

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/26-x-1-3-8.../181261095361?

Is this a good idea? Does anyone have experience with this wheel? Including their estimate for US shipping, I think the total will be close to US $100. Thanks!

ETA: Does anyone know of a US source for a wheel like this?

I do not have experience with this wheel, but based on the description--a narrow 5/16" axle and 90mm spacing-- it should fit. It looks like it has locknuts, but you may be able to work around them if they get in the way. That said, with shipping it will get up to $100, so I'd ask the seller if it will work. Then if it doesn't you have a case for returning it.

I'm not aware of a US source for that wheel--the Harris one will require you to spread the fork--but, as others have pointed out, you can get Sun CR-18 rims. I can't remember if an LTD-3 has Westrick on Endrick rims, but you may even be able to reuse your old spokes if you have Westricks.

sykerocker 11-27-13 11:08 AM


Originally Posted by arex (Post 16282947)
What tool is that? I'm interested because I'm going to have to cold-set my fork a bit, and anything that'll help me keep things straight will be well-appreciated.

Park FFS-1. It's runs around $60-70, is big, heavy, and will take whatever force you can possibly put on it. The few times I've had problems using the tool, it's because whatever I had the frame bolted to wasn't immobile enough. I finally solved that by inventing the Park FFS-2 (the 40 year old oak tree just outside my shop door, and a couple of good, strong straps).

adventurepdx 12-01-13 12:15 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Just saw this interesting three-speed listed on the Portland CL. Not that crazy about the choice of handlebars, though.
http://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/bik/4222797529.html


Reynolds 531 Elswick Clubman 3 Speed - $350 (sw portland)
The ultimate tweed ride bike, this 1951 Elswick Clubman was perhaps the high water mark for British three speeds featuring alloy fenders, a beautiful fork crown and Stallard type dropouts. Converted to 700c with alloy rims and Mafac brakes. Well used with 60+ years of patina and original finish. Price is firm for this very rare bicycle.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=353403

adventurepdx 12-01-13 04:44 PM

As I look at the photo of the Elswick more, I notice how some of the "details" that can be seen on the overall bike photo aren't present in the detail shots. Besides the bars, I just noticed that the chainguard is from a Triumph.

Also, did Elswick Clubmans originally come with 27" wheels?

rhm 12-01-13 05:00 PM


Originally Posted by adventurepdx (Post 16292548)
Also, did Elswick Clubmans originally come with 27" wheels?

Probaby. 26 x 1 1/4 is a possibility. 26 x 1 3/8 is less likely, as that was typically used on heavier bikes with upright bars.

BluesDaddy 12-03-13 07:34 PM

Quality, man. This is the lower headset cup on a 40+ year-old Raleigh Sports, after a couple minutes with Simple Green, Scotchbrite pad & 0000 steel wool.

http://i430.photobucket.com/albums/q...psfokdkg22.jpg

oldroads 12-04-13 05:44 AM

Hundred Year bicycles, they are.

Schwinnsta 12-05-13 07:30 PM

Question, I am getting ready to change out the rims of my 72 Raleigh Sports. This will be my first wheel rebuild. I have two CR-18 rims. My current spokes are original but are in good condition as are the rims. Are the current spokes the correct size?

Salubrious 12-05-13 09:25 PM

No. They are too long.

Sixty Fiver 12-05-13 10:33 PM


Originally Posted by BluesDaddy (Post 16298739)
Quality, man. This is the lower headset cup on a 40+ year-old Raleigh Sports, after a couple minutes with Simple Green, Scotchbrite pad & 0000 steel wool.

It has been rare to see a Raleigh headset in bad condition here... they can handle a lot of miles.

Schwinnsta 12-06-13 08:04 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 16305394)
No. They are too long.

Well, if I need new spokes, anyone have a good source. The LBS, who I like to support charges $2.00 a spoke. I need 72.

sykerocker 12-06-13 09:13 PM


Originally Posted by Schwinnsta (Post 16308390)
Well, if I need new spokes, anyone have a good source. The LBS, who I like to support charges $2.00 a spoke. I need 72.

I've been dealing with Niagara Cycle for a couple of years now. Their prices are good enough that, on my scale, I've put off trying to talk a serious wholesaler into taking me on as a customer. As to their spoke prices, $19-35.00 for a bag of 50 seems reasonable:

http://www.niagaracycle.com/search.p...h_query=spokes

surreal 12-06-13 09:32 PM

cheap spokes, custom lengths, with nerplez:
http://www.danscomp.com/products-PAR...14G_Spoke.html

gna 12-06-13 11:38 PM


Originally Posted by Schwinnsta (Post 16305092)
Question, I am getting ready to change out the rims of my 72 Raleigh Sports. This will be my first wheel rebuild. I have two CR-18 rims. My current spokes are original but are in good condition as are the rims. Are the current spokes the correct size?


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 16305394)
No. They are too long.

Not in my experience. If you have Westrick rims they are the correct size, but the left/right pattern of the rim may be different.

I taped CR-18s to my rims, loosened the spokes, and transferred them over one by one. I snugged up the spokes and trued the wheels.

markk900 12-07-13 06:48 AM


Originally Posted by gna (Post 16308724)
I taped CR-18s to my rims, loosened the spokes, and transferred them over one by one. I snugged up the spokes and trued the wheels.

Just be aware of the orientation of the spoke holes when you lay the rims side by side....each hole angles slightly to one side or the other and you can get them wrong!

gna 12-07-13 09:48 AM


Originally Posted by gna (Post 16308724)
... but the left/right pattern of the rim may be different.


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 16309107)
Just be aware of the orientation of the spoke holes when you lay the rims side by side....each hole angles slightly to one side or the other and you can get them wrong!

I had to offset where the valve stem was, but they worked ok.

Schwinnsta 12-07-13 02:01 PM


Originally Posted by gna (Post 16309377)
I had to offset where the valve stem was, but they worked ok.

What do you mean by this? I am not understanding. Guess I will soon.

Thanks everyone for all the info.


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