Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=181)
-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

jamesj 08-02-15 07:37 PM

Started taking the Superbe apart turns out it is a 1974. The stem was stuck but finally got it out with some WD-40. The thing is covered in grease, needs to be washed and polished. The paint like I said is pretty darn good. The front wheel needs to be adjusted and the rear needs oil.

here are some pics. Even took some awesome black and white stuff.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3766/...54bb5382_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/447/2...e024274d_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/522/2...e8799bbc_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/451/1...66caaeea_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/395/2...cbcdf0dc_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/519/2...08cdddf4_c.jpg

michaelz28 08-02-15 08:13 PM


Originally Posted by jamesj (Post 18037899)
Started taking the Superbe apart turns out it is a 1974. The stem was stuck but finally got it out with some WD-40. The thing is covered in grease, needs to be washed and polished. The paint like I said is pretty darn good. The front wheel needs to be adjusted and the rear needs oil.

here are some pics. Even took some awesome black and white stuff.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3766/...54bb5382_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/447/2...e024274d_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/522/2...e8799bbc_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/451/1...66caaeea_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/395/2...cbcdf0dc_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/519/2...08cdddf4_c.jpg

that's nice . I have a 74 also . a sports . your decal looks like its in a different location than mine ? http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/h...ps5pxv3y1t.jpg

smontanaro 08-02-15 08:40 PM

What type of lock is this? The bike was left on my son's front lawn. It's a Panther Luxus-Sport Klasse, according to Jake. If his attempts to contact the owner via the local PD and Craigslist are fruitless, how does he unlock/disable the lock?

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-q...802_183455.jpg
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-f...802_183703.jpg

dweenk 08-03-15 06:22 AM

^^^^^^^

That is a Tres Lock. I have one on a Raleigh, but fortunately it is in the unlocked position. That type of lock mechanism does not appear to be too complicated, so you may be able to jimmy it open with a bent wire or a modified luggage key. Worst case - hacksaw or grind off the part that protrudes into the path of the spokes.

smontanaro 08-03-15 02:06 PM

@dweenk Thanks. Passed along to Jake.

dweenk 08-03-15 02:58 PM

That is an interesting bike. Does it have 24" wheels, or oversize tires?

dweenk 08-03-15 03:03 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18023775)
First thing yesterday morning, an ad popped up in the local CL for a Raleigh Tourist - asking price $100. The photos looked like everything was in order, so I wasted no time in contacting the seller. We made arrangements to meet as soon as he returned from work that afternoon. I tried the bike and everything was in good order, so I didn't waste time by haggling over the price. Here are some "as found" photos.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467771http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467772http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467773http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467774http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467775http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467776http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467777http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=467778

Does anyone have suggestions on the best place to find replacement consumables (tires, tubes, brake pads)? Also, is there an easy method to remove the wheels (without completely removing the brake pads) for tire repair/changes?

Sorry to quote myself but I located the serial number (MS000547). The hub corroborates that, having a date of (80, 1). So I suppose I have a 1980 Malaysian made Tourist.

BigChief 08-03-15 04:48 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Every Raleigh badged bike from Asia I've ever seen bore little resemblance to the English made models. Here's an example. Your bike looks English to me.http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=468948http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=468949

smontanaro 08-03-15 05:20 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18040995)
That is an interesting bike. Does it have 24" wheels, or oversize tires?

Jake says the tires are 26x1.75...

jamesj 08-03-15 10:30 PM

my Raleigh that I was hit on was exactly like this one.

Gasbag 08-04-15 04:10 AM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18041021)
Sorry to quote myself but I located the serial number (MS000547). The hub corroborates that, having a date of (80, 1). So I suppose I have a 1980 Malaysian made Tourist.

That would be Malaysia (M), December (S), 1980 (O) production # 00547 . Raleigh Serial Numbers & Charts
Eleven months passed between hub production and frame stamping.

Are the brakes oriented rear right hand, front left hand? That is a good clue to whether the bike was built for USA import or came to our shores as someones personal belonging. It only applies to countries such as England that drive opposite of us. My CWS is LH rear brake, RH front brake.

BigChief 08-04-15 06:04 AM


Originally Posted by Gasbag (Post 18042494)
That would be Malaysia (M), December (S), 1980 (O) production # 00547 . Raleigh Serial Numbers & Charts
Eleven months passed between hub production and frame stamping.

Are the brakes oriented rear right hand, front left hand? That is a good clue to whether the bike was built for USA import or came to our shores as someones personal belonging. It only applies to countries such as England that drive opposite of us. My CWS is LH rear brake, RH front brake.

Every bike I've ever had used the right hand lever for the rear brake...except the rod brakes on my DL-1. Always thought that was odd. Mine is a 1973 export model with the hockey stick chainguard.

Gasbag 08-04-15 06:35 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18042670)
Every bike I've ever had used the right hand lever for the rear brake...except the rod brakes on my DL-1. Always thought that was odd. Mine is a 1973 export model with the hockey stick chainguard.

The plot thickens. I just checked both of my DL-1s and the 1969 mens frame is lh rear brake and the 1972 loop frame is RH rear brake. It is my understanding that in England and Japan LH rear brake is mandated for safety as they hand signal their intentions with the right hand.

It just occurred to me that the original owner of the 1969 DL-1 was of Asian descent and his accent was strong suggesting he may have immigrated. So who knows on that one?

dweenk 08-04-15 07:43 AM


Originally Posted by Gasbag (Post 18042494)
That would be Malaysia (M), December (S), 1980 (O) production # 00547 . Raleigh Serial Numbers & Charts
Eleven months passed between hub production and frame stamping.

Are the brakes oriented rear right hand, front left hand? That is a good clue to whether the bike was built for USA import or came to our shores as someones personal belonging. It only applies to countries such as England that drive opposite of us. My CWS is LH rear brake, RH front brake.

The brakes are LH front, RH rear.

BigChief 08-04-15 11:25 AM

I never noticed this before, but do you suppose it was deliberate on Raleigh's part to rout the brake cables differently than the home market for bikes exported to America? Didn't do a lot of research, but the English catalogs I see on line all show right hand to front cable routing and the American catalogs show right hand to rear. That would explain the the right hand to front brakes on my DL-1. Right hand to front was the standard and they just didn't bother to change the rod linkage for export.

Gasbag 08-04-15 12:22 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18043767)
I never noticed this before, but do you suppose it was deliberate on Raleigh's part to rout the brake cables differently than the home market for bikes exported to America? Didn't do a lot of research, but the English catalogs I see on line all show right hand to front cable routing and the American catalogs show right hand to rear. That would explain the the right hand to front brakes on my DL-1. Right hand to front was the standard and they just didn't bother to change the rod linkage for export.

From the U.S. Consumer product Safety Commission: Bicycle Requirements Business Guidance | CPSC.gov
(b) Hand levers have to be on the handlebars and readily usable. The distance between middle of a hand lever and the handlebar may be no wider than 3 inches (3 inches for levers on sidewalk bicycles). Unless a customer specifies otherwise, the hand lever that operates the rear brake must be on the right handlebar. The lever that operates the front brake must be on the left handlebar. A lever that operates both brakes may be on either handlebar. Please note that, if a bicycle has hand lever extensions, all tests are conducted with the extensions in place.

From the National Cycling Charity (British regulations): Safety Regulations | CTC
One might suppose that the remaining provisions of this regulation were comparatively trivial, and so they are. Every new bicycle has to come with:
  1. Any hand-operated brakes arranged left-hand rear, right-hand front

noglider 08-04-15 01:04 PM

The Italians route their brake cables the same way as the British. The French do it the same way as the Americans. Go figure. To my mind, it doesn't make much difference if the rider is conscious of how they are routed and what it means. I've been doing it the American way all my life and don't want to switch, but given that most people are right handed, I think the British way makes a little more sense. I say that because it is reflexive to use your dominant hand more, and on dry surfaces, the front brake is the more useful one. Half the people I survey believe it's better to rely on the rear brake primarily, and they are wrong.

Bandera 08-04-15 01:14 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 18044083)
The Italians route their brake cables the same way as the British.

For the traditional Cyclo Cross NDS dismount/carry/run/remount technique the right brake lever is Front.

-Bandera

Fidbloke 08-04-15 01:26 PM

It's definitely RH=Front, LH=Rear in Britain. Or least, it has been on any bike I've been on.
Some people I know have warned me about hiring a bike on the Continent. They have their brakes the other way round. My Dad hired a mountain bike in Central France a few years back, and found this out. You get used to it eventually..

I didn't know they were arranged like that in the States as well.?

Velocivixen 08-04-15 01:52 PM

I sometimes route my brake cables based on what looks better. If a side pull brake has cable entering on the drive side, I may use the right brake lever for the front, for example. For me it doesn't matter.

Salubrious 08-04-15 02:41 PM

I tend to put the front brake on the right, since that is the way it is on my motorbikes.

Slash5 08-04-15 05:02 PM

Swapping the brake levers from the "usual" locations leads to YouTube and "funniest home" videos. Seen it a couple of times.

Commando 08-04-15 05:34 PM


Originally Posted by Gasbag (Post 18043963)
From the U.S. Consumer product Safety Commission: Bicycle Requirements Business Guidance | CPSC.gov
(b) Hand levers have to be on the handlebars and readily usable. The distance between middle of a hand lever and the handlebar may be no wider than 3 inches (3 inches for levers on sidewalk bicycles). Unless a customer specifies otherwise, the hand lever that operates the rear brake must be on the right handlebar. The lever that operates the front brake must be on the left handlebar. A lever that operates both brakes may be on either handlebar. Please note that, if a bicycle has hand lever extensions, all tests are conducted with the extensions in place.

I wonder why the decision was made to have the front brake operated by the left hand. Early on, motorcycles eventually came to use the right hand to operate the front brake. In fact, US standards forced British motorcycle manufacturers to convert the rear brake pedal from the left to the right in the 70's so both brakes were operated on the same side. This also moved the gear change to the left and made for some gangly looking linkages and serious costs.

I can swap easily between both on my modern motorcycles and old British bikes, however.


I think the British way makes a little more sense. I say that because it is reflexive to use your dominant hand more, and on dry surfaces, the front brake is the more useful one
I've never given the bicycle levers a thought as to what is right and wrong, and took no notice of the "national" difference until recently. If the front brake lever is on the left though, I usually switch it over to the right bar to stay in line with my motorcycles and for the reasons mentioned by Noglider.

BigChief 08-04-15 06:26 PM

Well, this explains why the brake levers are reversed from what I'm used to on my old DL-1. This is a great forum, learning new things all the time.
I don't know why I should be surprised that some bureaucracy is demanding a particular cable routing on bicycles, but I am. I suppose I'm hopelessly old fashioned.

michaelz28 08-04-15 08:26 PM

my 69 schwinn stingray is right rear ..they all should be

Sixty Fiver 08-04-15 09:31 PM

I run all my bikes right front / moto as do my children... it may have started with my Rudge which had this set up and since I used to ride motorcycles this was pretty natural for me.

I always have to warn people if they take my bikes for a spin... especially on those bikes that have really powerful brakes.

Narhay 08-06-15 11:27 AM

I've been looking at a number of wheels on the Raleigh superbes I have kicking around the house. I've noticed that their 2, 3 and 4 cross lacing patterns are over over over instead of over over under. Anyone else notice this with their wheels? I've relaced them with aluminum rims and corrected it but it seems like they were built that way.

thumpism 08-06-15 11:42 AM


Originally Posted by Narhay (Post 18050668)
...cross lacing patterns are over over over instead of over over under. Anyone else notice this with their wheels? it seems like they were built that way.

My three Sportses are like that and most others I've seen as well. Might have been cheaper to produce that way.

I ride both bikes and motorcycles and keep the brakes left-front on the bicycles with no ill effect.

markk900 08-06-15 02:39 PM

I'm with @thumpism: don't have any problem making the switch to whatever side the brakes are on, though I will cop to trying too downshift my Ducati single with the rear brake once....

BigChief 08-07-15 08:26 AM

A while ago, I bought a 55 Rudge Sports in terrible condition so I could have fun doing a total restoration and maybe some customization without wrecking a bike that deserved preservation. It has a 70s SA trigger with only a small broken bit of the original plastic cover under the screw, so I've been looking for an earlier trigger to keep the 1950s feel. I knew a fellow who had a 3 or 4 speed 50s window trigger in very good condition for sale, but I thought somebody polished off the chrome plating from the faceplate, leaving it plain brass, so I didn't buy it. Later I found the same trigger on a salvage bike that had been left outside for years and restored it as best as I could. It was rusty and pitted, but the chromed faceplate was in very good condition. Then I figured that I should buy the clean trigger and swap the faceplates so I could have a really good one for my Rudge and put the ruined plate on the pitted case and have a useable but messed up 50s trigger for a future project. So, I stopped by and bought the trigger with the ruined faceplate. On closer inspection with an eye loupe, I was surprised to see the brass trigger had traces of brass plating on the band and not a trace of chrome. It was now almost all bare steel. Also, not a trace of chrome anywhere on the faceplate. Not even in the corners of the embossed logo. I now believe this trigger was originally made with an all brass finish even though I have never seen this in my experience or research of old English bikes.
Today, I see this eBay listing. Now I'm totally convinced SA offered these triggers in a decorative brass finish. So, just another bit of SA minutiae for us 3 speed enthusiasts.
Vintage Sturmey Archer 3 Speed Trigger 1 Raleigh BSA Rudge Hercules | eBay


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:31 AM.


Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.