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-   -   Does a 700c (622mm) tire fit on a 630mm rim? (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=582790)

alakri 09-08-09 12:22 PM

Does a 700c (622mm) tire fit on a 630mm rim?
 
Hello everyone

I recently purchased an older (probably 70's or early 80's) road bike with a CILO frame and a Shimano 600 system. The rear wheel seems to have bursted and i am trying to fix it myself. I removed the rear tire as well as the tube. The only indication i found was "63 Made in France" on the tube/tire and "Mavic" on the rim. Judging by the list of tires on sheldon brown's website i am guessing that i must have a 27", 630mm rim. Now since these aren't around as much anymore i was wondering if anybody has experience with putting on a slightly smaller 700c or 622mm on a 630mm frame and whether this is a good idea or not....
Thanks for the replys.

AK

Shimagnolo 09-08-09 12:25 PM

No.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

CCrew 09-08-09 12:26 PM

700cc will fit on a 27" frame as long as you have the 700c wheels and 4mm left to move the brake pads down to match the smaller rim. Many do have this capability, some don't.

That said, what's the rear dropout width? Many older bikes aren't the 130mm that the newer 700c wheels are. As you can see, it has the potential to be a can of worms...

cman 09-08-09 12:28 PM

Should be okay. The only thing you may not have is enough brake reach. Dropout spacing should not be an issue on a steel frame.

cycle_maven 09-08-09 12:31 PM

I've heard of somebody managing to do it, with some serious struggling, but it is absolutely not a good idea.

That being said, 27" (630) tires are widely available, but there might not be as great a selection as for 700c tires, especially in the narrower widths.

Codys311 09-08-09 12:39 PM


Originally Posted by cycle_maven (Post 9635741)
That being said, 27" (630) tires are widely available, but there might not be as great a selection as for 700c tires, especially in the narrower widths.

Too true. Since you can still buy decent wheels in the 27" size, as well as a variety of different tires, there's not much of a reason to switch to 700c unless you need really high performance wheels/tires. As far as trying to put 700c tires on a 27" rim, I can't say that I've ever tried it, but I can definitely say that I wouldn't want to...especially since my LBS carries a great selection of 27" tires.

DannoXYZ 09-08-09 04:02 PM

I've managed to mount 700c tyres onto 27" rims a customer brought in one time. He said he spent quite a lot of money on the tyres through mail-order and didn't want to send them back to switch for the proper size tyres. So I loaned him some 18" motorcycle tyre-levers to mount the tyres. He managed to force the 1st tyre on, but it was completely distorted and the sidewalls were wrinkled and squeezed down between the rim-edges. On the 2nd wheel, he managed to bend and bow out the rim-edges enough that it cracked the rim.

I told him I'd be more than happy to sell him a set of 700c wheels to go with his new tyres... ;)

masiman 09-08-09 04:11 PM


Originally Posted by DannoXYZ (Post 9637319)
...So I loaned him some 18" motorcycle tyre-levers to mount the tyres. He managed to force the 1st tyre on, but it was completely distorted and the sidewalls were wrinkled and squeezed down between the rim-edges. On the 2nd wheel, he managed to bend and bow out the rim-edges enough that it cracked the rim.

I told him I'd be more than happy to sell him a set of 700c wheels to go with his new tyres... ;)

:roflmao:

At least you didn't try to play hero and do it for him, then he would have had argument to have you replace the wheels at your cost. Now if it had been a pretty girl, hmm, maybe a different outcome, but it would still be funny.

:beer:

alakri 09-09-09 01:36 AM

Hey guys, thanks for the replies! I'm off to my local bike store. I guess i'll try to find a 27" tire+tube to fit my wheel. muchas gracias. best regards from switzerland!

cycle_maven 09-09-09 01:07 PM

Oh- you're in Switzerland! That changes a lot. Before buying a new tire, measure the diameter of your rim- It may be a 622 after all- I didn't think that 630's were ever very common in Europe. Remember that the 622 or 630 diameter is the bead seat diameter, so the rim diameter will be a little more.

The inner tube should fit either diameter.

garage sale GT 09-12-09 03:27 PM

I think the guys who said you could easily do it were referring to putting a 700c wheel onto the bike.

I prefer to buy my 27" tires online because the selection is better.

operator 09-12-09 07:05 PM

Lol. Half the posters in this thread didn't even bother to read the OP's post. 27" (630bsd) are a dime a dozen. Hell walmart has them.

old and new 09-12-09 07:12 PM


Originally Posted by operator (Post 9664158)
Lol. Half the posters in this thread didn't even bother to read the OP's post. 27" (630bsd) are a dime a dozen. Hell walmart has them.

TRUE on both counts ... LBSs though are less likely to have them, I'd heard the line from shops many years ago concerning the scarcity and even had a man offer to try to fit a 700 on my 27" rim ... bad idea. Walmart and the cheaper on-line stores : Performance, Nashbar have plenty.

Jaeger 09-12-09 08:26 PM


Originally Posted by operator (Post 9664158)
Lol. Half the posters in this thread didn't even bother to read the OP's post. 27" (630bsd) are a dime a dozen. Hell walmart has them.

And others don't seem to realize that there are no Walmarts in Switzerland. Or that 27" tires were pretty rare there.

Chris_W 09-14-09 06:28 AM

I also live in Switzerland, and I can't remember seeing any 27" tires being sold here. However, amongst the hundreds of tires that veloplus.ch sells, they do stock ONE 27" tire - a 27 X 1 1/4 Schwalbe Marathon for 39 CHF (Swiss Francs), see here, they are even listed as being in stock! Given this, I expect that if your local bike store sells any Schwalbe tires then they can also order this tire from their distributor for you. As stated above, do not try to mount a 700c tire.

Johntcl 12-02-21 07:46 AM

Local Bike contact
 

Originally Posted by Codys311 (Post 9635826)
Too true. Since you can still buy decent wheels in the 27" size, as well as a variety of different tires, there's not much of a reason to switch to 700c unless you need really high performance wheels/tires. As far as trying to put 700c tires on a 27" rim, I can't say that I've ever tried it, but I can definitely say that I wouldn't want to...especially since my LBS carries a great selection of 27" tires.


Hi I am from Singapore, my wheel size is 27" size, appreciate you can share with me your local bike email contact for me to order the 27" x 1" x 3/4" (height). Thank you

cxwrench 12-02-21 10:37 AM


Originally Posted by Johntcl (Post 22326436)
Hi I am from Singapore, my wheel size is 27" size, appreciate you can share with me your local bike email contact for me to order the 27" x 1" x 3/4" (height). Thank you

You might want to check the date of that last post...it was 2009. I'm sure you can find 27" tires somewhere on the interwebs if you'd put the effort into looking for them.

dmark 12-02-21 12:00 PM


Originally Posted by Johntcl (Post 22326436)
Hi I am from Singapore, my wheel size is 27" size, appreciate you can share with me your local bike email contact for me to order the 27" x 1" x 3/4" (height). Thank you

Check this thread:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ce-thread.html
Good comments and some links. Last pages are fairly current.
I like these for my C&V wheels:
https://www.westernbikeworks.com/pro...7-x-1-1-4-tire

squirtdad 12-02-21 01:46 PM


Originally Posted by operator (Post 9664158)
Lol. Half the posters in this thread didn't even bother to read the OP's post. 27" (630bsd) are a dime a dozen. Hell walmart has them.

true but harder to get higher end ones panaracer pasela

Iride01 12-02-21 02:07 PM

Though the noob is looking for a 1-3/4" tire. Unless that is a mistake. That's probably a very rare 27" tire if they ever made on that size.

All I can say for that is they need to look at their old tire. Google to see if the manufacturer is still making 27" tires in that size and then find out where to buy them. Many mfr's have a dealer locator or where to buy on their site if they don't do online sales themselves.

And the noob should also double check the old tire for the ISO or ETRTO size that probably is embossed or stamped on the tire to double check this isn't some kind of other than 27" tire that just says 27" on it. Maybe a 27.5 x 1.75 tire which is for a 584mm bsd rim, not the 27" tires 630 bsd rim.

Oh.... Johntcl welcome to BF ! We sometimes are a little blunt and brutal here. Just read everything with a smile and don't let us get under your skin. We mean well in spite of ourselves.

Road Fan 12-05-21 11:19 AM


Originally Posted by cycle_maven (Post 9643119)
Oh- you're in Switzerland! That changes a lot. Before buying a new tire, measure the diameter of your rim- It may be a 622 after all- I didn't think that 630's were ever very common in Europe. Remember that the 622 or 630 diameter is the bead seat diameter, so the rim diameter will be a little more.

The inner tube should fit either diameter.

Well, recall the UK at least had a “lightweight” tire option at least back into the 1950s, the 27 x 1 ¼ “high pressure” up to 90 psi. My 1952 Rudge has those as new, with nice, elegant Dunlop rims which perfectly held the old tires, and perfectly hold a pair of modern Specialized Road Force in that designation - wired beads on rims designed for them. So at least in UK such tires were once avjailable widely enough for folks to use them on daily bikes.

Today? I can’t say.

ThermionicScott 12-05-21 01:21 PM


Originally Posted by Road Fan (Post 22329563)
Well, recall the UK at least had a “lightweight” tire option at least back into the 1950s, the 27 x 1 ¼ “high pressure” up to 90 psi. My 1952 Rudge has those as new, with nice, elegant Dunlop rims which perfectly held the old tires, and perfectly hold a pair of modern Specialized Road Force in that designation - wired beads on rims designed for them. So at least in UK such tires were once avjailable widely enough for folks to use them on daily bikes.

Chris was talking about Europe, not the UK. :p

Road Fan 12-05-21 05:45 PM


Originally Posted by ThermionicScott (Post 22329653)
Chris was talking about Europe, not the UK. :p

just in case Europe sometimes includes the UK

dabac 12-06-21 02:07 AM

If ”need” be, 700C tubulars can fit on 630mm rims.
Rideable, but not overall a great solution.

Trakhak 12-06-21 07:58 AM


Originally Posted by dabac (Post 22330178)
If ”need” be, 700C tubulars can fit on 630mm rims.
Rideable, but not overall a great solution.

People make that claim from time to time, but until I see a video of someone actually installing a tubular tire on a 630-mm (27") rim, or at least a photo supporting the claim, I'll remain dubious. Most tubulars require quite a bit of stretching (and sometimes cursing, in my experience) to fit on 700c tubular rims, let alone a 27" rim with raised sidewalls.

That said, some tubulars stretch considerably after being installed on a tubular rim and inflated, so maybe it's possible. If anyone can provide a video or photo demonstrating such a combination, please post it here.

dabac 12-06-21 01:12 PM


Originally Posted by Trakhak (Post 22330306)
People make that claim from time to time, but until I see a video of someone actually installing a tubular tire on a 630-mm (27") rim, or at least a photo supporting the claim, I'll remain dubious. Most tubulars require quite a bit of stretching (and sometimes cursing, in my experience) to fit on 700c tubular rims, let alone a 27" rim with raised sidewalls.

That said, some tubulars stretch considerably after being installed on a tubular rim and inflated, so maybe it's possible. If anyone can provide a video or photo demonstrating such a combination, please post it here.

I didn’t think it’d be such a controversial statement. If It’d known, I’d put more effort into documenting it.
But really, it’s no big deal.
Think about it. On a rim for tubulars, the surface that the tubular tire sits on is only a touch inside the outer edge of the brake track.
On a clincher, the ”bottom” of the rim is at the inner edge of the brake track.
The net effect is that the diameter where a tubular tire ends up resting is a tad less for a tubular on a 630 mm rim than for a tubular on a tubular-specific rim.
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...8ae7d6898.jpeg
This was my project bike and rolling test bed for several experiments. 630 mm hookless rims.
It doesn’t have the tubulars here.
As I said, 700C tubulars on 630 mm clinchers is rideable but not ultimately worthwhile - which I’d discovered by the time of the pic.


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