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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BigChief 09-29-19 01:41 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21143116)
1958 Blue Superbe
This one just popped up on Kijiji today
$200.00 asking
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...34094d0b86.png
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5576197cc3.png

Nice one. Only missing pedals, saddle, reflector, front mudguard tip and of course the original grips. Those gray R grips would go nicely on this one. Dyno in the rear hub here. That's different from what I usually see on Superbes.

Commando 09-30-19 08:30 PM

Tube question

I'm in a bit of a pickle today as I've got my Raleigh Superbe here at work and I'm off for a ride with a mate as soon as I'm done.
My rear tube has just blown out at the valve so no repairing that. I've rung up a local bike shop and they've got Duro (#4608) 26x 1 /38x1 1/2 tubes, unfortunately neither the packaging nor the tube have ISO marked on them. That tube isn't showing in Duro's current catalogue, but I'm 90% sure it's the right one.
Duro used to have a single tube listed for ISO's 584, 590, & 597, and I'm assuming the tube the shop has covers our 590 (1 3/8) as well as 650B 584mm (1 1/2).

Before I head out of my way for the tube, can anyone confirm my assumption that Duro's 26x 1 3/8x1 1/2 tube will fit my 1 3/8 tyre?

Thankshttps://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...322206e131.jpg

BigChief 10-01-19 03:37 AM

That's the right tube. The 590mm tires are 37mm to 40mm wide so that comes out to around 1 1/2"

gster 10-01-19 07:37 AM

Another Rim
I took the opportunity yesterday to replace some spokes on the failed 6 speed project.
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...27f12f2066.jpg
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...39527dcdbb.jpg
This rim is labelled EA3 DUNRICK (Dumlop+Endrick) 26" x 1-3/8".
Hub is dated 1961.
Despite this, it took me close to an hour to fit the tire.
In fact, I replaced the spokes with the deflated tire in place...

Commando 10-01-19 08:05 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 21145385)
That's the right tube. The 590mm tires are 37mm to 40mm wide so that comes out to around 1 1/2"

Thanks BigChief,

I made the trip out to the shop before I got your reply, I had no other choice. Perfect fit, and the guys at the shop were happy to find out what the tubes were for. They've had 12 of them sitting under the counter for a few years and nobody could remember why they had them, it's a 'big box' type bike shop and I was amazed they had them, apparently so were they.

Was a great ride, first time out on the Superbe in over 3 years. It's been in storage since my daughter got too big to carry around on it, and then we moved house and all the crap that goes with that. I gave the Sturmey some fresh oil, lubed the cables, and away she went. Rode like a dream and now she's back at the front of the garage for regular use. Time to lace up the new alloy rims I got for it ages ago, freshen up the BB, and perhaps some new brake calipers.

BigChief 10-02-19 05:51 AM


Originally Posted by Commando (Post 21146608)
Thanks BigChief,

I made the trip out to the shop before I got your reply, I had no other choice. Perfect fit, and the guys at the shop were happy to find out what the tubes were for. They've had 12 of them sitting under the counter for a few years and nobody could remember why they had them, it's a 'big box' type bike shop and I was amazed they had them, apparently so were they.

Was a great ride, first time out on the Superbe in over 3 years. It's been in storage since my daughter got too big to carry around on it, and then we moved house and all the crap that goes with that. I gave the Sturmey some fresh oil, lubed the cables, and away she went. Rode like a dream and now she's back at the front of the garage for regular use. Time to lace up the new alloy rims I got for it ages ago, freshen up the BB, and perhaps some new brake calipers.

Alloy rims do work great on these roadsters. You may run into a couple issues with modern dual pivot calipers. I have only one roadster with modern Tektro R559 calipers. It has no mudguards so I have no experience with clearance problems I've heard others mention, but I did have an other issue with the rear brake. There's no brazed on cable stops on the older bikes. The rear cable housing goes all the way from the lever to the rear caliper. In my opinion, all that housing compression is way too squishy for the rear dual pivot caliper. No matter how close you set the pads to the rim, the lever almost touches the handlebar grip at full on braking. I solved the problem by adding 2 bolt on cable stops to the top tube, but I didn't know at the time about compression-less cable housing. That may be the most practical solution, but I haven't tried it. The bolt on stops are working fine.

Ged117 10-02-19 07:02 PM

1940s-1950s CCM-Raleigh Project
 
I'm going to see what I think is a 1940s-1950s CCM ladies model tomorrow morning. Next week I'm picking up a '72 Sports, again ladies model. I plan to use the components from the Raleigh (AW and switch gear, likely brake calipers too) for the CCM. I think the CCM has a coaster brake and I can't see any rim brakes in the below photos. Do you fellows think it has the coaster brake? Reviewing the catalogue I found online for 1951 CCM ladies models, they could have a coaster hub, a free wheel, or a SA three speed. I think this one has a coaster. I really like the CCM design and colour, and I think she will too. I also like that it is a piece of Canadian industrial heritage. Does anyone know more about this era of CCM? I don't know very much. I imagine it would be relatively simple to install an AW equipped 26 x 1 3/8 rim, and the seller claims the bike has 26" wheels (not the 28" Canadian rims I expected), but we'll see tomorrow. I'm hoping all the frames were drilled for rim brakes, even if they weren't fitted to this one. It is an interesting bicycle for sure. I think that is a Brooks saddle, but it could be something else.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/wj...Y=w899-h662-no

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/r9...c=w899-h657-no

clubman 10-02-19 07:21 PM


Originally Posted by Ged117 (Post 21147898)
I'm going to see what I think is a 1940s-1950s CCM ladies model tomorrow morning. ...I'm hoping all the frames were drilled for rim brakes, even if they weren't fitted to this one. It is an interesting bicycle for sure. I think that is a Brooks saddle, but it could be something else.

These were fine roadsters but had some quirks. No they weren't drilled for rim brakes and as the pic suggests, this looks to have 28 (700c) Cdn size westwood rims so brake calipers are useless. These woman's frames in general looked very similar over 5 decades of production. Serial numbers (at the seat post lug will help. I've a couple of these with either TCW (coaster0 or KT (cable0 operated rear drums. CCM rarely put front brakes on this generation of internal hub! Poor risk management..
Some SA hubs require rear fork spacing as well.

Saddle looks like a used up Brooks? Circa 60's model based on chrome fenders?

Commando 10-02-19 07:26 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 21146857)
Alloy rims do work great on these roadsters. You may run into a couple issues with modern dual pivot calipers. I have only one roadster with modern Tektro R559 calipers. It has no mudguards so I have no experience with clearance problems I've heard others mention, but I did have an other issue with the rear brake. There's no brazed on cable stops on the older bikes. The rear cable housing goes all the way from the lever to the rear caliper. In my opinion, all that housing compression is way too squishy for the rear dual pivot caliper. No matter how close you set the pads to the rim, the lever almost touches the handlebar grip at full on braking. I solved the problem by adding 2 bolt on cable stops to the top tube, but I didn't know at the time about compression-less cable housing. That may be the most practical solution, but I haven't tried it. The bolt on stops are working fine.

I'm going to fit the rims first and see how much the braking improves, I'm sure it will be more than adequate. My Superbe has two cable stops along the top tube, I suppose because it's a later model, '75 or '76, can't remember.

Ged117 10-02-19 08:36 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 21147922)
These were fine roadsters but had some quirks. No they weren't drilled for rim brakes and as the pic suggests, this looks to have 28 (700c) Cdn size westwood rims so brake calipers are useless. These woman's frames in general looked very similar over 5 decades of production. Serial numbers (at the seat post lug will help. I've a couple of these with either TCW (coaster0 or KT (cable0 operated rear drums. CCM rarely put front brakes on this generation of internal hub! Poor risk management..
Some SA hubs require rear fork spacing as well.

Saddle looks like a used up Brooks? Circa 60's model based on chrome fenders?

Thanks for the response Clubman. That is disappointing to hear that they weren't drilled - do you think the coaster brake would be adequate? That does limit the bike for her intended use - commuting to work, day rides, errands. I might just stick with the '72 Sports. I'll keep you posted.

gster 10-03-19 05:49 AM


Originally Posted by Ged117 (Post 21147898)
I'm going to see what I think is a 1940s-1950s CCM ladies model tomorrow morning. Next week I'm picking up a '72 Sports, again ladies model. I plan to use the components from the Raleigh (AW and switch gear, likely brake calipers too) for the CCM. I think the CCM has a coaster brake and I can't see any rim brakes in the below photos. Do you fellows think it has the coaster brake? Reviewing the catalogue I found online for 1951 CCM ladies models, they could have a coaster hub, a free wheel, or a SA three speed. I think this one has a coaster. I really like the CCM design and colour, and I think she will too. I also like that it is a piece of Canadian industrial heritage. Does anyone know more about this era of CCM? I don't know very much. I imagine it would be relatively simple to install an AW equipped 26 x 1 3/8 rim, and the seller claims the bike has 26" wheels (not the 28" Canadian rims I expected), but we'll see tomorrow. I'm hoping all the frames were drilled for rim brakes, even if they weren't fitted to this one. It is an interesting bicycle for sure. I think that is a Brooks saddle, but it could be something else.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/wj...Y=w899-h662-no

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/r9...c=w899-h657-no

You can join/post photos and questions on this site
Vintage CCM

I've had a few CCM 3 speeds in the past but
decided to limit my insanity to English bikes...

sykerocker 10-03-19 06:47 AM


Originally Posted by Ged117 (Post 21147992)
Thanks for the response Clubman. That is disappointing to hear that they weren't drilled - do you think the coaster brake would be adequate? That does limit the bike for her intended use - commuting to work, day rides, errands. I might just stick with the '72 Sports. I'll keep you posted.

Having built a number of Ďfake fixiesí (coaster brake single speeds built on vintage 10-speed frames in the fashionable minimalist style), Iíve never had a problem using a coaster brake hub on a commuter bike. Yeah, itís possible to skid the bike on wet pavement, but a reasonably judicious application of the pedals, and most commuters doing ride in the rain, anyhow.

gster 10-03-19 07:11 AM


Originally Posted by sykerocker (Post 21148296)
Having built a number of Ďfake fixiesí (coaster brake single speeds built on vintage 10-speed frames in the fashionable minimalist style), Iíve never had a problem using a coaster brake hub on a commuter bike. Yeah, itís possible to skid the bike on wet pavement, but a reasonably judicious application of the pedals, and most commuters doing ride in the rain, anyhow.

I've built a couple of coasters as well.
A large frame Raleigh w/ 28" wheels.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b2444b270b.jpg

And a nice Glider w/ a 2 speed kick back hub.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6121faf5cc.jpg
As pointed out by someone else on this forum, adding a front brake is
a must if you plan to actually "ride" the bike.

Ged117 10-03-19 08:06 AM


Originally Posted by sykerocker (Post 21148296)
Having built a number of Ďfake fixiesí (coaster brake single speeds built on vintage 10-speed frames in the fashionable minimalist style), Iíve never had a problem using a coaster brake hub on a commuter bike. Yeah, itís possible to skid the bike on wet pavement, but a reasonably judicious application of the pedals, and most commuters doing ride in the rain, anyhow.

I think it would be great for me, but I'd like her to have some more stopping power in a pinch situation. She is also unfamiliar with coaster brakes, and found the idea a little spooky. I'll clean up the brakes on the '72 and fit kool-stop salmon pads. I found a blue colour-match fork on eBay as well.

I use the Panaracer col de la vie tires on my Raleigh, and I haven't had any issue with punctures or flats, and they have a real comfy ride, but I was thinking of using Schwalbe's delta cruiser in black instead on this bike for extra insurance for her 6 mile commute. How is the ride? Seems like they have good flat resistance at least. Anybody use them daily in traffic / paths?

52telecaster 10-03-19 09:00 AM

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...54c348f398.jpg
This showed up at the coop in peoria il. 1955 ahttps://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f1e45b9faf.jpg
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...0e38fbe58d.jpg
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...47dbd8ff10.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1ee7f860d1.jpg
ccording to the hub.

gster 10-03-19 12:13 PM

1951 Raleigh Lenton
found on Kijiji, Guelph
listed as a 1951 for $250.00
This may have been posted/discussed previously.
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...79f6b27579.jpg
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f53bcc83c9.jpg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...5ca7ed291c.jpg
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...cb40b9ad35.jpg
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-road-bike/gu...ationFlag=true

Ged117 10-03-19 12:48 PM


Originally Posted by 52telecaster (Post 21148458)
This showed up at the coop in peoria il. 1955 according to the hub.

I don't remember where Armstrong sits in the Raleigh pecking order (or did TI not own Armstrong in 1955?), but that colour is really fantastic. I like seeing '40s and '50s survivors like that. I think I should spend more time at my local co-op here in Ottawa...

52telecaster 10-03-19 01:03 PM


Originally Posted by Ged117 (Post 21148790)
I don't remember where Armstrong sits in the Raleigh pecking order (or did TI not own Armstrong in 1955?), but that colour is really fantastic. I like seeing '40s and '50s survivors like that. I think I should spend more time at my local co-op here in Ottawa...

It was tempting at 65.00 but i have a houseful of bikes now. Were it a 23" mens I'd buy it.

BurleyCat 10-03-19 11:01 PM

I'm considering going to a 700c wheel on my 1950 Rudge, because they're more common than the 27" as found on my Raleigh Sprite 5spd. There appears to be plenty of room in the fork and rear triangle. And while I'm at it, I should be able to fit a decent set of short/regular reach alloy brakes to replace the stock steel items. I've scanned a few posts here that address the issues that others have dealt with when making similar modifications. Any wisdom on preferred rim and tire combinations as well as upgraded vintage caliper brake considerations?

52telecaster 10-03-19 11:11 PM


Originally Posted by BurleyCat (Post 21149476)
I'm also considering going to a 700c wheel on my 1950 Rudge, because they're more common than the 27" as found on my Raleigh 5spd. There appears to be plenty of room in the fork and rear triangle. And while I'm at it, I should be able to fit a decent set of short/regular reach alloy brakes to replace the stock steel items. I'm wondering if you swapped out brakes and what tire size you've chosen for those 700c hoops?

I've done what you're thinking about doing. The front fork on my robin hood just barely had enough room for 32s and a fender. If your bike takes 27s thought it will be fine of course. I will say I like 700s on three speed bikes. Seems like they roll really nice.

jackbombay 10-04-19 12:47 AM

My favorite townie 3 speed has 700's on it, I LOVE IT! I actually ride it pretty far at times, a century earlier this summer and many half centuries on it.

BigChief 10-04-19 07:47 AM


Originally Posted by 52telecaster (Post 21149486)
I've done what you're thinking about doing. The front fork on my robin hood just barely had enough room for 32s and a fender. If your bike takes 27s thought it will be fine of course. I will say I like 700s on three speed bikes. Seems like they roll really nice.

An issue for a 1950 Raleigh conversion to 700 would be the hubs. Raleigh used 40 spoke rear and 32 spoke front hubs back then. They didn't change to 36/36 until sometime in the mid 70s.

jackbombay 10-04-19 09:38 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 21149771)
An issue for a 1950 Raleigh conversion to 700 would be the hubs. Raleigh used 40 spoke rear and 32 spoke front hubs back then. They didn't change to 36/36 until sometime in the mid 70s.

You can get 20 hole 700c rims and use every other hole on the hubs.

Hudson308 10-04-19 10:36 AM

I know they made Sun Mistral 700c clincher rims with 40 holes, as I've got a pair stashed. 32-hole rims are everywhere as well.

Ged117 10-04-19 11:29 AM

I'm building a 700c 40h wheel with a sturmey four speed FW hub from '53 and a 1963 dynohub 36h for the front. Velocity still makes 40h rims, but true that 40h is slowly disappearing. I imagine a few years from now we'll have to hunt for new leftovers, or find good used ones for 40h wheel builds using 40h SA hubs. Plenty of older rims would be ok. I considered super champion vintage for my Peugeot club bike commuter build, but I decided to go with new while I still can.


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