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phrantic09 09-17-21 12:52 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22234413)
It's kind of a giant pain.


I'd much rather pay someone to do it for me.

genejockey 09-17-21 12:53 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22234407)
I worry about anyone who isn't uneasy about not knowing how the **** they rely on works. For me, knowing how to fix stuff is a huge ego thing, as it was for many of the boys I grew up with. That seems to be gone or is manifested in surface knowledge of electronic gizmos and software. I tried to pass it on to my daughter, but it didn't take, even though she was always mechanically minded, likes cars, and builds mathematical models of real world things for a living.

The thing about being a Scientist, especially a biologist working in BioPharma, is that you have to understand how little you understand, and you have to simultaneously need to know how it works and accept that you never really will, beyond a small corner of it.

LesterOfPuppets 09-17-21 12:54 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22234420)
I'd much rather pay someone to do it for me.

I'd rather do most of it myself.

#mustlovebloodyknucklesandswearing

phrantic09 09-17-21 12:57 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22234421)
The thing about being a Scientist, especially a biologist working in BioPharma, is that you have to understand how little you understand, and you have to simultaneously need to know how it works and accept that you never really will, beyond a small corner of it.

Same is true in my area of work in a different way, my department staff need to understand every bit about how others do their jobs process wise without knowing how to do their jobs. For example, they know our clinical processes end to end but have no idea how to be a clinician or case manager.

phrantic09 09-17-21 12:58 PM


Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets (Post 22234422)
I'd rather do most of it myself.

#mustlovebloodyknucklesandswearing

It's opportunity cost for me

Mojo31 09-17-21 12:59 PM


Originally Posted by sbxx1985 (Post 22234238)
What kind of law do you practice?

Commercial litigation (mostly federal)

Commercial transactions (mostly oil field and construction)

General stuff for small to mid-size businesses (employment, real estate, etc.)

What about you?

genejockey 09-17-21 01:01 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22234413)
It's kind of a giant pain.

My hobbies have tended to be ones where I could actually do the work myself, with practice and the right tools. Archery - I know how to fletch arrows, twist bowstrings, and even tiller a selfbow (or I USED TO know, 15-20 years ago). Vintage watches - I can tear them down, clean them, reassemble, lube and regulate them, and do some minor adjustments. Bikes - I can take them apart and rebuild them, and fix most everything on them. Haven't built a wheel yet, though. The mechanical aspect is always part of the fun, for me. Others, in the same pursuits, buy all their items ready-made, have them serviced exclusively by others, etc. and probably get at least as much enjoyment out of their hobbies as I get out of mine. But I wouldn't.

rjones28 09-17-21 01:01 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22234191)
One time I got referred to a GI doctor. When I checked in I was standing at the receptionist desk doing the regular stuff and she asked to see my insurance card. I causally tossed it toward her on the counter, thinking nothing of it.

Somehow the doctor got word of this (greatly exaggerated, no doubt). He comes in the exam room and says, "Do you have a problem with my staff members? If you do, this appointment is over."

I was like, "wut" Not even knowing what he was referring to.

Anyway, I wonder what my notes said for that appointment. Probably not "pleasant."

Oh, brother.

Mojo31 09-17-21 01:02 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22234420)
I'd much rather pay someone to do it for me.

This.

seedsbelize2 09-17-21 01:03 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22234191)
One time I got referred to a GI doctor. When I checked in I was standing at the receptionist desk doing the regular stuff and she asked to see my insurance card. I causally tossed it toward her on the counter, thinking nothing of it.

Somehow the doctor got word of this (greatly exaggerated, no doubt). He comes in the exam room and says, "Do you have a problem with my staff members? If you do, this appointment is over."

I was like, "wut" Not even knowing what he was referring to.

Anyway, I wonder what my notes said for that appointment. Probably not "pleasant."

Same thing happened to me

rjones28 09-17-21 01:04 PM


Originally Posted by sbxx1985 (Post 22234212)
"Dickhead."

Folks sometimes do that to me at the bike shop. This is the name I give them (in my mind).

Velo Vol 09-17-21 01:06 PM

I'd love to jettison all mechanical things that break.

rjones28 09-17-21 01:07 PM


Originally Posted by sbxx1985 (Post 22234303)
We got a very one sided opinion of the witch doctor.

The fact that she calls them "the witch doctor" is a clue.

MoAlpha 09-17-21 01:07 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22234421)
The thing about being a Scientist, especially a biologist working in BioPharma, is that you have to understand how little you understand, and you have to simultaneously need to know how it works and accept that you never really will, beyond a small corner of it.

That's a very important point. As Dunning and Kruger demonstrated, you have to know a lot to know how little you know.

Mojo31 09-17-21 01:07 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22234401)
Yes, and they listen. When I was younger and cars were just mechanical things the problem with male customers was worse. I always wondered, if they know what's wrong with it then why are they bringing it to me?
It's harder for them to argue about an electric car but they still do. I had a guy tell me there are just a bunch of 12 volt batteries in the bottom of an e-car. Another told me his e-car didn't have a cooling system, why would batteries need coolant? Or a radiator?
One Volt customer was stuck on the miles per charge thing. "it's false advertising to say the range is 50 miles". It's an estimate depending on many things. "Why does it show a different number each time I charge it". The number is generated by an algorithm based on the way you've been driving. He thought it meant it was charged to a different level each time and I tried to explain it as patiently as I could but he was very agitated. Finally a salesman took him off my hands.

God forbid he read the owner's manual.

You just plug them in for a while and then go. Who cares about all that other stuff. :thumb:

Just don't drive it till it runs out of charge! Hard to get back home when you do that.

genejockey 09-17-21 01:11 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22234448)
That's a very important point. As Dunning and Kruger demonstrated, you have to know a lot to know how little you know.

"The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt." - Bertrand Russell.

rjones28 09-17-21 01:13 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22234348)
A smooth flick of the wrist, which resulted in the card being right in front of her.


Velo Vol 09-17-21 01:14 PM

Periodic reminder:

https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9ba95b4e62.png

LesterOfPuppets 09-17-21 01:15 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22234443)
I'd love to jettison all mechanical things that break.

So you're putting down the trumpet and getting a low-maintenance bugle?

datlas 09-17-21 01:15 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22234457)
"The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt." - Bertrand Russell.

He said cock-sure.
Are you sure?

Hehehehehehehehe.

#BeavisAndButthead

bampilot06 09-17-21 01:16 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22234418)
I assume it's better regardless right?


ill let you know in 3 months.

seedsbelize2 09-17-21 01:17 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22234407)
I worry about anyone who isn't uneasy about not knowing how the **** they rely on works. For me, knowing how to fix stuff is a huge ego thing, as it was for many of the boys I grew up with. That seems to be gone or is manifested in surface knowledge of electronic gizmos and software. I tried to pass it on to my daughter, but it didn't take, even though she was always mechanically minded, likes cars, and builds mathematical models of real world things for a living.

Having been a shade tree mechanic for many years, I haven't the first clue about how my current car works. I was underneath it yesterday, replacing the plastic protector thing, and noted it has a catalytic converter. A friend and I were discussing whether he could buy a car here and drive it back to the states. It has electrical power steering! Wtf?
Edit: Of course I still understand the nuts and bolts of it but the electronics aspect has me baffled.

WhyFi 09-17-21 01:19 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22234448)
That's a very important point. As Dunning and Kruger demonstrated, you have to know a lot to know how little you know.

D&K would love BF.

Velo Vol 09-17-21 01:20 PM


Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets (Post 22234464)
So you're putting down the trumpet and getting a low-maintenance bugle?

I haven't had anything break/need replaced on the trumpet. Some of the finish doesn't look great, though. Sad.

Mojo31 09-17-21 01:23 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22234476)
I haven't had anything break/need replaced on the trumpet. Some of the finish doesn't look great, though. Sad.

That's called patina.


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