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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

big chainring 07-30-19 09:57 PM

I keep it really simple. I use 3M Fastak trim adhesive. Put the tire on the rim. Inflate slightly. Remove a small section of tire and squirt the glue on the rim. Replace tire section. Work around the wheel in that manner. Inflate the tire. Center and adjust tire. Let dry for 45 minutes. Go ride.

I have noticed the Fastak is somewhat short lived. After a few months I reglue the tires. It kinda completely evaporates. But since my riding season is about three or four months, its a refresh in Spring kinda thing.

davei1980 07-31-19 09:07 AM


Originally Posted by big chainring (Post 21052798)
I keep it really simple. I use 3M Fastak trim adhesive. Put the tire on the rim. Inflate slightly. Remove a small section of tire and squirt the glue on the rim. Replace tire section. Work around the wheel in that manner. Inflate the tire. Center and adjust tire. Let dry for 45 minutes. Go ride.

I have noticed the Fastak is somewhat short lived. After a few months I reglue the tires. It kinda completely evaporates. But since my riding season is about three or four months, its a refresh in Spring kinda thing.

I cannot find 3PM Fastak anywhere do you guys mean yellow weatherstrip adhesive?

Fun fact - when I used to work on the stock car racing team, that's the stuff we used to glue the lug nuts to the rims with to make live pit stops faster. Same stuff they use at the highest levels of NASCAR.

noglider 07-31-19 09:16 AM


Originally Posted by Last ride 76 (Post 21052743)
I've said it before, that is one gorgeous bike! :thumb:

Thank you, Eric. It's possible the back pain is caused by my position on the bike. Maybe the reach is longer than I'm used to. I've ridden the bike more since then, and I've gotten used to the tires again. It was an adjustment after riding 32mm clinchers at 50 psi.

seedsbelize 07-31-19 10:05 AM

Tubular curious

Wildwood 08-01-19 11:07 AM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 20884117)
@daviddavieboy, you don't find the Sprinters to ride harshly? Perhaps my problem is either 1. I'm not used to narrow tires any more, or 2. my bike is the harsh thing. It could be both, primarily number 2.

Conti Sprinters ride harshly?
Was pumping my 22mm Sprinters yesterday, not paying attention much, when suddenly the eyes refocused on the pressure gauge - whoops 130psi. Let some air out to 115. Then I checked the sidewall and these Sprinters are rated to 12bar = 174psi. As are some other Conti models. So I assume the material/construction to be stronger/stiffer on Conti's, especially in the sidewall area.

Other brands (that I roll) max at 10bar - for a comparable tire width.

Homebrew01 08-01-19 11:11 AM

Continentals don't impress me. The don't stretch well for mounting, and just never seem as supple as others like Vittoria.

noglider 08-01-19 02:16 PM

Thanks, @Wildwood. But just because the tire can take 12 bar doesn't mean it's a good pressure for me! :)

Wildwood 08-01-19 03:20 PM


Originally Posted by Homebrew01 (Post 21055103)
Continentals don't impress me. The don't stretch well for mounting, and just never seem as supple as others like Vittoria.

Admittedly, my favorites are VeloFlex 25&28mm tires (Roubaix, Arenberg + Vlaanderen) and Spec Turbo 24mm.
My Conti experience is limited to 22mm Sprinters on 2 bikes and 23mm Giros on 1. The Giros were already mounted on a wheelset I purchased.

Totally agree they are less supple, but I haven't purchased Conti's more expensive models.

No experience with Vittoria's upper level tubies, only clincher. And I like the new G+ tire coupled with latex tubes VERY much - but only tested on 1 bike.

edit: The Schwalbe G1 tubie at 30mm is my off pavement roadie (also NOT supple), and their Racing Ralph has been on 2 of my bikes for 33mm knobbie needs.

Wildwood 08-01-19 03:31 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 21055377)
Thanks, @Wildwood. But just because the tire can take 12 bar doesn't mean it's a good pressure for me! :)

Understood! :thumb:

Nor I, but the point is maybe the higher pressure would necessitate a stiffer sidewall??, thereby explaining the harsher ride.


For me, on a relatively smooth road 22mm pumped to 120psi makes for a FEELING of quicker accelerations + responsive handling + speed. I would probably not take 22/23s on a ride beyond 40-50mi, I have bikes/wheelsets with fatter for those occasions.

jimmuller 08-02-19 04:31 AM


Originally Posted by Wildwood (Post 21055518)
For me, on a relatively smooth road 22mm pumped to 120psi makes for a FEELING of quicker accelerations + responsive handling + speed. I would probably not take 22/23s on a ride beyond 40-50mi, I have bikes/wheelsets with fatter for those occasions.

When I'm doing a longer ride those quicker accelerations, responsive handling, and speed are exactly what I want (and I don't believe it is just "feel" since I know what cadences and gears I run).

pastorbobnlnh 08-02-19 06:07 AM

I haven't been able to ride as much as I'd like this season. However yesterday I met up with three buddies from church and we drove to Burlington, VT to do the "Three Ferries Tour." It is a 40 mile jaunt around the northern end of Lake Champlain. Begins with an hour long ferry ride to Port Essex, NY, includes a ferry ride back to Grand Isle in VT, and the final leg is on a gravel/paved rail trail causeway across the Lake. The causeway includes a five or so minute ride on the Bike Ferry to cover the gap where a swing bridge once stood for the railroad.

Anyway--- they rode their modern 11 speed cassettes and compact cranks on carbon fiber Cannondales and a Trek--- with clinchers :p while I navigated and paced them on my '71 Paramount with classic looking Schwalbe One tubulars. :thumb: I was grinding away with my nearly 50 year old five speed freewheel and Campagnolo Rally/Record transmission while they were SIS clicking or DI switching on their 105, Ultegra, and DuraAce magic marvels.

It was a fun ride and I carried in my classic handlebar bag the jar of dill pickles and juice to consume to ward off cramps. All the pickles and most of the juice was gone at the end of the ride :D

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...128db146dd.jpg
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3a4aff2059.jpg

RVS 08-02-19 10:05 AM

I still are using tubulars

Wildwood 08-02-19 10:30 AM


Originally Posted by jimmuller (Post 21056226)
When I'm doing a longer ride those quicker accelerations, responsive handling, and speed are exactly what I want (and I don't believe it is just "feel" since I know what cadences and gears I run).

+100 :thumb:

But
Who gets 40+ miles on smooth pavement? At some point for me the 25/28mm cush from nice compliant tubular tires overtakes the need for speed. Not being a mileage man like yourself, that becomes about mile post 40 on my rides.

Life is Goood.
Ride On!

bikemig 08-02-19 10:36 AM

I may need to get a pair of tubular wheels working again. It has been a long time since I've ridden them but they do ride nice.

tiredhands 08-02-19 12:08 PM

My first experience with oversized tubulars has been pretty great. These are some Challenge Strada Bianca 700x30c mounted to Major Tom rims. I haven't taken them on a long ride yet, or over any rough stuff, but my commutes have gotten a lot faster. They're very fast and comfortable, even though I used too much glue on the front tire and didn't mount them perfectly the first try. They still aren't 100% aligned, but I can barely tell.


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ro...=w1249-h937-no

79pmooney 08-02-19 12:19 PM


Originally Posted by tiredhands (Post 21056831)
My first experience with oversized tubulars has been pretty great. These are some Challenge Strada Bianca 700x30c mounted to Major Tom rims. I haven't taken them on a long ride yet, or over any rough stuff, but my commutes have gotten a lot faster. They're very fast and comfortable, even though I used too much glue on the front tire and didn't mount them perfectly the first try. They still aren't 100% aligned, but I can barely tell.


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ro...=w1249-h937-no

You did take the proper precaution to minimize the ill effects of crooked tire mounting - the basket with stuff in it. (Crooked sewups only slow you down if you think about it. So ... they slow you down far less in back, less with fenders on. Hastily mount a spare because you are in a rough part of town and fear for your bike and welfare? That crooked tire won't slow you down at all! Just be careful on corners.)

A little shared wisdom from 70,000 miles of sewups.

Ben

Drillium Dude 08-02-19 01:28 PM

If I wanted to tape a pair of tubulars to a pair of rims that had previously had tires glued to them, presumably I'd need to remove all the old glue first, right? But if I were to simply re-glue them, do I need to remove the old glue?

I've taped but never glued tubulars. Think I'd like to stick with the tape. What say all of you?

I'm thinking of designating one bike a tubular bike, so will perhaps be getting back into tubulars on a small scale. Want to do it right.

DD

squirtdad 08-02-19 02:06 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21056951)
If I wanted to tape a pair of tubulars to a pair of rims that had previously had tires glued to them, presumably I'd need to remove all the old glue first, right? But if I were to simply re-glue them, do I need to remove the old glue?

I've taped but never glued tubulars. Think I'd like to stick with the tape. What say all of you?

I'm thinking of designating one bike a tubular bike, so will perhaps be getting back into tubulars on a small scale. Want to do it right.

DD

FWIW brass brush on a drill gets rid of glue quickly

squirtdad 08-02-19 02:11 PM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize (Post 21053427)
Tubular curious

I am still really a newbie but what I have learned is

Gluing is not really that big of a deal Taping is easy but not order of magnitudes easier than gluing

the ride is worth it....even tires that have a rep for being not as smooth as other tubuies are still smoother than the equal clincher

At risk of jinxing my self, i have been lucky and not had flats....but my mileage is low

all in all going tubie seems about 1000% less hassle than going tubeless

davei1980 08-02-19 02:24 PM


Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 21057007)
FWIW brass brush on a drill gets rid of glue quickly

I used the wire-brush attachment on my angle grinder. Just held it in place with one hand and rotated the wheel in the truing stand in the other. Took the old glue of in maybe 4mins

I am the son of a welder and I have learned the acetelene torch and angle grinder are two tools who are undefeated!

davei1980 08-02-19 02:28 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21056951)
If I wanted to tape a pair of tubulars to a pair of rims that had previously had tires glued to them, presumably I'd need to remove all the old glue first, right? But if I were to simply re-glue them, do I need to remove the old glue?

I've taped but never glued tubulars. Think I'd like to stick with the tape. What say all of you?

I'm thinking of designating one bike a tubular bike, so will perhaps be getting back into tubulars on a small scale. Want to do it right.

DD

See my quote above - I have used my angle grinder with a wire brush wheel - works great although I would see why some would caution against using such a tool on nice rims. I am pretty steady with it but would be easy to possibly do some damage. Bonus - if you use the angle grinder/wire brush attachment you can probably skip the sanding stage prior to gluing! +1 to Squirtdad's tape vs. glue question. I have never glued before this pair and it can get messy but not rocket science. Watch some videos. You'll be fine. Hardest part is centering, although I have heard if they're not perfectly centered that's fine, I just have no corroborating evidence for this.

Drillium Dude 08-02-19 03:56 PM


Originally Posted by davei1980 (Post 21057052)
See my quote above - I have used my angle grinder with a wire brush wheel - works great although I would see why some would caution against using such a tool on nice rims. I am pretty steady with it but would be easy to possibly do some damage. Bonus - if you use the angle grinder/wire brush attachment you can probably skip the sanding stage prior to gluing! +1 to Squirtdad's tape vs. glue question. I have never glued before this pair and it can get messy but not rocket science. Watch some videos. You'll be fine. Hardest part is centering, although I have heard if they're not perfectly centered that's fine, I just have no corroborating evidence for this.

Since I have a lot of Dremel experience (!) I will try a wire brush attachment on it and go from there. Thanks for the suggestion!

The tape job I did recently for another Forum member was easy-peasy. Made it super-simple to locate the tire exactly where we wanted it, then you just pull the protective tape off and you're all set. Bob Freeman says tape holds much better, too - tho that can be a bit of a hassle when getting a tub off, I suppose.

DD

Drillium Dude 08-02-19 03:57 PM


Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 21057007)
FWIW brass brush on a drill gets rid of glue quickly

Thanks, I'll give that a shot with the Dremel.

DD

davei1980 08-02-19 04:02 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21057186)
Since I have a lot of Dremel experience (!) I will try a wire brush attachment on it and go from there. Thanks for the suggestion!

The tape job I did recently for another Forum member was easy-peasy. Made it super-simple to locate the tire exactly where we wanted it, then you just pull the protective tape off and you're all set. Bob Freeman says tape holds much better, too - tho that can be a bit of a hassle when getting a tub off, I suppose.

DD

I like it! maybe I'll try tape next time!

squirtdad 08-02-19 04:16 PM


Originally Posted by davei1980 (Post 21057052)
See my quote above - I have used my angle grinder with a wire brush wheel - works great although I would see why some would caution against using such a tool on nice rims. I am pretty steady with it but would be easy to possibly do some damage. Bonus - if you use the angle grinder/wire brush attachment you can probably skip the sanding stage prior to gluing! +1 to Squirtdad's tape vs. glue question. I have never glued before this pair and it can get messy but not rocket science. Watch some videos. You'll be fine. Hardest part is centering, although I have heard if they're not perfectly centered that's fine, I just have no corroborating evidence for this.

brass brush....not steel very important


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