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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BigChief 08-08-15 07:55 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Guess that explains it. OA removes the chrome as well as the rust. Here's the before and after of mine using the Evaporust.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469885http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469886

nlerner 08-08-15 07:59 AM

I also have a trigger with a brass face:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-z...rCourseAM4.jpg

Gasbag 08-08-15 08:05 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18056156)
Guess that explains it. OA removes the chrome as well as the rust. Here's the before and after of mine using the Evaporust.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469885http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469886

Looks like I may need to try Evapo-Rust. Some of my recent OA experiences haven't been impressive, especially on pre-war nickle plating. Does it harm spokes when cleaning rims? Is it safe on painted surfaces?

I really need new rim cleaning technology, I'm sooooooo tired of cleaning rims by hand.

gster 08-08-15 08:14 AM

3 Attachment(s)
1971 Hercules Update.
This one's almost done for the time being. I installed a pulley on the seat post but it turns out that both of the fulcrum clips i had were too big.I'm still on the lookout for some more mini fenders but may just put the originals back on.
Total cost to date: Bike @ $80.00, New tires @ $30.00, new chain @ $10.00, NOS pedals @ $5.00, new shifter cable @ $8.00, new bearings @ $2.00, vintage saddlebags @ $25.00 = $155.00.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469888http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469889http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=469890

BigChief 08-08-15 09:33 AM


Originally Posted by Gasbag (Post 18056183)
Looks like I may need to try Evapo-Rust. Some of my recent OA experiences haven't been impressive, especially on pre-war nickle plating. Does it harm spokes when cleaning rims? Is it safe on painted surfaces?

I really need new rim cleaning technology, I'm sooooooo tired of cleaning rims by hand.


Don't think it would work so well on rims unless you could soak them somehow. It's not very aggressive. The results on this trigger came from 2 days of soaking in a jar. It works well, but slowly.

BigChief 08-08-15 09:37 AM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 18056165)
I also have a trigger with a brass face:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-z...rCourseAM4.jpg


Gotta say, the brass plate does look nice.

jamesj 08-08-15 07:50 PM

I know this isn't the ISO thread but I figured this would be the best place to ask, does anyone have a pair of Brake cable adjusters as well as the mounting hardware. please Message me if so. Also if moderators need to move this go ahead. thanx

Here is what I'm looking for.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/428/2...0c946969_z.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/400/2...e58b5c51_z.jpg


thanx

gster 08-09-15 08:26 AM

6 Attachment(s)
Final post on this one.
1971 Hercules
I did re route the gear cable through a fulcrum stop and pulley (Fulcrum courtesy of George at Parts Unknown at the foot of Fraser Ave here in Toronto).
Restored the original fenders and chain guard and pushed the saddle bags back a bit as they were interfering with both the indicator chain and the back of my foot as I peddled...
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470075http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470076http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470077http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470078
Also found at Parts Unknown this winged Glider chain guard. Not sure if I'll keep it on this bike (1964 Glider), but I'll try it for a while.
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470079http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470080

markk900 08-09-15 08:51 AM

@gster: I know you like those shorty fenders but I do think the Hercules looks better with the longer ones. Nice work on both bikes (my Glider is languishing in the basement right now - awaiting inspiration).

What tires did you use for the Hercules?

gster 08-09-15 12:53 PM

I agree on the fenders. I originally planned to build a path racer but after attaching the saddle bags it returned to it's original form. The tires are simple Kendas from Canadian Tire @ $14.00/each.

SirMike1983 08-09-15 02:38 PM

Those brass plate shifters are among my favorites. I have a handful of them, some on bikes and some in the parts bin. They function well with the FW and the AW hubs, are pretty well made, and look nice.

rubah 08-09-15 06:47 PM

My current project is swapping out the frame on bike #2 so my boyfriend can actually get on it to ride. He's shorter than me, and it must be the 23" Sport, since I could barely get on it in the lowest seat position. It doesn't help that it has a big ol' thick saddle on it, but he's not going to be riding enough to care what kind of saddle it has, as long as he thinks it should be comfortable. I got a Superbe lady's frame from ebay and it's not in great condition, but the original Sport frame wasn't in great shape either. They're different colors, too, so it'll be a hot mess.


Originally Posted by PatrickZ (Post 17749364)
I missed your earlier posts, but did you also service your cranks before adjusting the chain guard? There is sufficient space on the flat surface of the spindle to allow the crank to be properly seated, but further outboard the bottom bracket than normal, thus causing the chainguard to rub. This happened to me once.

glad I searched this thread! I finally got around to disassembling my bottom brackets, and after cleaning and putting it back together, found it very difficult to turn the cranks to drive the sprocket, but when I went the opposite direction where there was no load, it was fine. And when I would run the wheel by itself, there was also no issue (after I readjusted it a dozen times to stop rubbing against the fender stays... or the brakes... or the top of the fender... damn narrow clearances!) Anyway, drove the cotter back out, wiggled the chainring a little, drove the cotter back in, repeat a couple of times because I couldn't figure out if the nutted ends of the cotters should be same or alternate... I hope it's okay if they're on the same side, 'cause I don't want to keep risking my luck with this dang cotter. I had used the press from the co-op, but it's about half an hours' drive, so I have to plan my trips there efficiently.

[Edit, pic of the bee that fell out of my bottom bracket...]
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Fv...52whvpG_0=s600

dweenk 08-10-15 01:46 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Today I finally got around to repairing a Sturmey Archer trigger that I've been "meaning to get to" for a couple of years. The pawl spring was broken and needed to be replaced. It is the older type of spring that is made of flat stock. A few weeks ago one of the forum members pointed me to an Ebay seller who had a couple of them for a decent price. I had removed the pawl rivet long ago (I saved the original and made a backup from a nail just in case). The job turned out to be a minor PITA, but it came together well in the end. I was even able to reuse the original rivet. I have attached a photo of the repaired trigger and the spare spring.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470386

BigChief 08-11-15 03:30 AM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18062574)
Today I finally got around to repairing a Sturmey Archer trigger that I've been "meaning to get to" for a couple of years. The pawl spring was broken and needed to be replaced. It is the older type of spring that is made of flat stock. A few weeks ago one of the forum members pointed me to an Ebay seller who had a couple of them for a decent price. I had removed the pawl rivet long ago (I saved the original and made a backup from a nail just in case). The job turned out to be a minor PITA, but it came together well in the end. I was even able to reuse the original rivet. I have attached a photo of the repaired trigger and the spare spring.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=470386


Getting those pins lined up while under spring pressure is a bit tricky. I love these old shifters, well worth the effort.

dweenk 08-11-15 02:56 PM

I have a Sturmey Archer SC3 hub from 1988 that needs repair. I've never had to rebuild an AW hub (they seem to be invincible), but I've been told that they are fairly easy to deal with. I know that many folks think that the SC3 was a poor design - but I have one that does not want to freewheel.

I have a diagram and exploded view of the hub, but I would appreciate tips from folks who have actual experience in the process.

JohnDThompson 08-11-15 04:42 PM


Originally Posted by rubah (Post 18059922)
drove the cotter back out, wiggled the chainring a little, drove the cotter back in, repeat a couple of times because I couldn't figure out if the nutted ends of the cotters should be same or alternate... I hope it's okay if they're on the same side, 'cause I don't want to keep risking my luck with this dang cotter. I had used the press from the co-op, but it's about half an hours' drive, so I have to plan my trips there efficiently.

If I'm understanding your question about the cotters, they should alternate; that is, with the crank arms horizontal, one pin should should have the nut facing up and the other side should have it facing down. If they're both facing the same direction, the arms won't be 180 apart and pedalling will feel goofy.

BigChief 08-11-15 07:16 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18066378)
I have a Sturmey Archer SC3 hub from 1988 that needs repair. I've never had to rebuild an AW hub (they seem to be invincible), but I've been told that they are fairly easy to deal with. I know that many folks think that the SC3 was a poor design - but I have one that does not want to freewheel.

I have a diagram and exploded view of the hub, but I would appreciate tips from folks who have actual experience in the process.

Never worked on a sc3 hub, but I did see this video. Might be some similarities.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hm0YgtZyAE

I watch things like this on my coffee breaks.

Gasbag 08-12-15 04:33 AM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18066378)
I have a Sturmey Archer SC3 hub from 1988 that needs repair. I've never had to rebuild an AW hub (they seem to be invincible), but I've been told that they are fairly easy to deal with. I know that many folks think that the SC3 was a poor design - but I have one that does not want to freewheel.

I have a diagram and exploded view of the hub, but I would appreciate tips from folks who have actual experience in the process.

If the drive side bearing cone is too tight, that might be all that is keeping it from freewheeling.

When I rebuild a hub, I layout a white towel and place the parts in a row in order of disassemble; non drive to the right, hub center, drive side left. Inward facing is placed upward on the towel. Each part cleaned and inspected prior to removing the next part. I leave pawls and springs in place unless there is a reason to remove them. Bearings get packed with Phil Woods grease upon reassembly. Sliding parts assemblies get a very light coating of PW grease.

Gasbag 08-13-15 07:27 AM

The crank cotters came in the mail for my CWS restoration last week. Same day, I tripped while doing yard work and injured my shoulder. The shoulder was and still is painful so I put off fitting the cotters so I could rest it and let it heal. This morning it felt better so I started fitting the cotters and noticed the body of my home brew http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ter-press.html cotter press was cracked and is now officially a paperweight. Grrrrrrrrr :cry:. Ordered a cotter press and cup tool from BikeSmith design. They are a bit pricey but I've long earned my living as a truck mechanic and inferior and faulty tools get my dander up. Maybe next week I can get back to it.

BigChief 08-13-15 09:32 AM


Originally Posted by Gasbag (Post 18071467)
The crank cotters came in the mail for my CWS restoration last week. Same day, I tripped while doing yard work and injured my shoulder. The shoulder was and still is painful so I put off fitting the cotters so I could rest it and let it heal. This morning it felt better so I started fitting the cotters and noticed the body of my home brew http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ter-press.html cotter press was cracked and is now officially a paperweight. Grrrrrrrrr :cry:. Ordered a cotter press and cup tool from BikeSmith design. They are a bit pricey but I've long earned my living as a truck mechanic and inferior and faulty tools get my dander up. Maybe next week I can get back to it.


It's pricey, but did you notice how he upped his game on this tool? Plated now, nice rounded edges, quite slick. Not a home made tool anymore.

Gasbag 08-13-15 10:30 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18071913)
It's pricey, but did you notice how he upped his game on this tool? Plated now, nice rounded edges, quite slick. Not a home made tool anymore.

It is a much better looking tool now. The BikeSmith press also looks to have the advantage of properly installing cotters due to the cotters nut can be left on during the pressing process. I was going to make a fixed cup tool but BikeSmith discounts $5 for the combined purchase and there is no additional charge for shipping. I guess this means I'm going to have to restore some more English bikes so I can justify the purchase :thumb:

gna 08-13-15 11:21 AM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 18066378)
I have a Sturmey Archer SC3 hub from 1988 that needs repair. I've never had to rebuild an AW hub (they seem to be invincible), but I've been told that they are fairly easy to deal with. I know that many folks think that the SC3 was a poor design - but I have one that does not want to freewheel.

I have a diagram and exploded view of the hub, but I would appreciate tips from folks who have actual experience in the process.

I've done two. The links to diagrams and instructions at Sheldon Brown are helpful. It's not that hard to rebuild. The biggest problem is getting the left side adjusted correctly when tightened down. I had to use "Kentucky windage" to set it.

BigChief 08-13-15 02:12 PM

I bought the BB tool with the discount. Even though I never remove the fixed cup for a normal service. So, it's oiled and wrapped in plastic way back in the tool box just in case I ever need to replace a fixed cup. You never know after all and it's always fun to get new tools.

Velocivixen 08-13-15 02:32 PM

@gna - what's "Kentucky windage"?

dweenk 08-13-15 04:03 PM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 18072787)
@gna - what's "Kentucky windage"?

When you aim at the target and you are not quite sure that you are right - you shoot a little left or right (depending) - then you recalc your "Kentucky windage" if you missed. And that's the truth.


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