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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BigChief 12-28-15 07:47 AM


Originally Posted by Narhay (Post 18418240)
These tires came off a 1978 Raleigh Superbe. I've found this tread pattern on a number of old 3 speeds and it seems to have disappeared over the years. The tires may be old but they are very plush.

Kenda uses that same tread on it's Schwinn 26" 597 tires
http://www.amazon.com/Kenda-Schwinn-...44H8BATDJKYCAT

BigChief 12-28-15 08:34 AM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 18418401)
I've also never seen the oiler port on the drive side like that. It's usually on the NDS for easier access.

It does make more sense to place the oil port on the NDS. I'll guess that the lug was placed in the drill press fixture backwards by a Monday morning worker.

Velocivixen 12-28-15 10:32 AM

My 1955 Phillips had its port on the NDS.

3speedslow 12-28-15 12:13 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by Narhay (Post 18418240)
These tires came off a 1978 Raleigh Superbe. I've found this tread pattern on a number of old 3 speeds and it seems to have disappeared over the years. The tires may be old but they are very plush.




http://i1037.photobucket.com/albums/...ps4upexhnf.jpg

Like it when they come with the original tires in at least short time ride-able condition.

+1 they are certainly plush! I have 2 similar tires on my 73 Sport. http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=495504 These have the lines but center tread has solid squares down the middle.

clubman 12-28-15 02:41 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18418502)
It does make more sense to place the oil port on the NDS. I'll guess that the lug was placed in the drill press fixture backwards by a Monday morning worker.

I've seen more than a few models with the port on the drive side. Here's a 53 Rudge. edit, I think my 55 Humber is the same.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-H...te%2B3%2B-%2B1

IronDan 12-28-15 04:14 PM

My triumph palm beach tourist and Raleigh Trent tourist both have oiler port on the drive side

BigChief 12-28-15 05:38 PM

Interesting. Positioning of the oil port might be a useful dating feature if we had more data. It is more accessible on the NDS but there is more stress on the drive side bearing, so there is reason for either side. Also interesting to me is the 23-28 tubing sticker on the 1953 Rudge. That narrows the change down another year for me. I once had a 52 hub date Rudge with that sticker. Mine has a '55 hub and the diamond shaped 20-30. Still no idea what the difference in alloy would be since Raleigh, or was it Tube Investments Corp, seemed to use it's own names for steel. The usual names for this kind of mild carbon steel starts with the number 10. 10-18 10-20 and 10-28. Another Raleigh mystery I guess. I can't remember which side of the BB the oiler was on, but it was a button type, not a flip top.

clubman 12-28-15 06:09 PM

@BigChief, I'm interested as to why the drive side bearing would be under more stress? If there was even the slightest play, might the spindle act as a lever and transfer more energy to the NDS races? Left side cottered cranks are always more prone to loosening although for different reasons. Anyone?

noglider 12-28-15 06:43 PM

@Narhay and @BigChief, the longitudinal tread on those tires is awful. Be glad it's almost out of production. Don't buy those Kendas. Riding tires like that was the only time a tread pattern ruined my ride.

noglider 12-28-15 06:56 PM

Yeah, I think left (NDS) cranks get more stress than right cranks, because when you crank on the right, your crank turns the chainring, but when you crank on the left, you send lots of torque through the spindle which then turns the chainring.

BigChief 12-28-15 09:16 PM

That could, very well, be true. I was transferring my experience with old English motorcycles to bicycles and I'm sure different forces and wear patterns apply. Old triumph Bonnevilles will eat up drive side main bearings at twice the rate of NDS bearings.

BigChief 12-29-15 05:58 AM

Planning on ordering some parts. Can anyone tell me what length spokes I'll need to lace up a 40H SA AW hub and a SA 32H hub to Sun CR-18 26x590 rims? Thanks

JohnDThompson 12-29-15 08:42 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18420625)
Planning on ordering some parts. Can anyone tell me what length spokes I'll need to lace up a 40H SA AW hub and a SA 32H hub to Sun CR-18 26x590 rims? Thanks

For 3-cross lacing, I use 272mm spokes. It's also good practice to use a couple spoke washers under each spoke head to take up the slack with modern spokes designed for thick aluminum flanges when lacing to the thin steel flanges of the AW hub.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21DPs-qB8JL.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/Brass-Spoke-Wa.../dp/B008G85RVA

smontanaro 12-29-15 08:51 AM


Originally Posted by JohnDThompson (Post 18420813)

I notice the description reads (in part): Removes tactical play in spokes

I wonder how you remove strategic play in spokes. :D

BigChief 12-29-15 10:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Thanks @JohnDThompson. How about for this regular 32H Raleigh hub?
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=495639

JohnDThompson 12-29-15 11:08 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 18421002)
Thanks @JohnDThompson. How about for this regular 32H Raleigh hub?
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=495639

If it has a 34mm diameter flange, 3-cross lacing should use 284mm spokes, again preferably with washers.

BigChief 12-29-15 11:51 AM

Thanks again for your help. This really is a great group here

redfoxdogs 12-29-15 05:25 PM

Really behind on posts, but I like the paint job. Is it more of an olive green, or is it my monitor? I like the rear rack quite a bit.

redfoxdogs 12-29-15 05:39 PM

Love the paint on this!



Originally Posted by Bicyclz (Post 18357231)
Here's one of my Royal Enfield Superlights.
From circa 1960 with 531 mainframe (IE. Not forks or rear stays) which has original paint.
Quite a nice period machine in my opinion.
http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/...20etc%20LR.jpg
http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/...ofile%20LR.jpg

Brakes, stem, bars not original, but I have them in reserve: )


redfoxdogs 12-29-15 05:50 PM

Beautiful!


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 18375011)
This past Sunday was a special day for me. On a grey cool day I donned a tweed cap and wool sweater and went for my first ride on the Raleigh Roadster, "Sir Wayes A. Tonne". Wow! This bike is a different ride than I had imagined. Smooth, upright, momentum, all words describing the tour of the 'hood. Thanks to all BF peeps for your help and support.


redfoxdogs 12-29-15 06:55 PM

1 Attachment(s)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=495723


This was on the cover of the Williams-Sonoma catalog that arrived in the mail today. Looks a little like my Twenty, big wheel in the back. Cool bars to hold the front basket. What is it? Cover says the store is The Cook's Atelier in Beaune, France.

BigChief 12-29-15 08:26 PM


Originally Posted by redfoxdogs (Post 18422338)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=495723


This was on the cover of the Williams-Sonoma catalog that arrived in the mail today. Looks a little like my Twenty, big wheel in the back. Cool bars to hold the front basket. What is it? Cover says the store is The Cook's Atelier in Beaune, France.


1940s Low Gravity Carrier
http://www.jaysmarine.com/1948raleighcat_us_22_lg.jpg

clubman 12-29-15 08:29 PM


Originally Posted by redfoxdogs (Post 18422338)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=495723


This was on the cover of the Williams-Sonoma catalog that arrived in the mail today. Looks a little like my Twenty, big wheel in the back. Cool bars to hold the front basket. What is it? Cover says the store is The Cook's Atelier in Beaune, France.

It's a low gravity carrier of which there were hundreds if not thousands made in Europe. Guessing a brand correctly would require psychic powers.

Or email them info@thecooksatelier.com :)

clubman 12-29-15 08:35 PM

I own one of these but it's a mess. Weighs at least 45 lbs.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-q...o/delivery.jpg

CuttersRidge 12-29-15 08:48 PM

That Royal Enfield is indeed, dashing, that company has flair, as to the other topic at hand, I always called them Butcher Bikes. That CCM is fine as well.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5016/5...028302c5_z.jpg

And a modern company in Copenhagen calls themselves that (with an "and" in it):

Butchers & Bicycles

And work bikes and so on, they get called. Very nice to drive things around on.

CuttersRidge 12-29-15 09:06 PM

New term for me, I didn't realize there were what people call "Mexican Cargo Bikes" so do a websearch if one wants to know more. Kind of cool, all of the ones I see so far are that orangish-yellow, orange cream maybe?

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2460/...a98bd236e0.jpg

Looks like a company called "Mercurio" make a commercial state-side version.

I also find "Dutch Cargo Bikes", so one can check it out for themselves. "Long John Cargo" bikes too. Must be a brand, I think I've heard of them.

And that Chinese bike, non-cargo, named after some bird? I've seen some of those, "Pigeon"? I'm not sure, it's foggy now, but I thought that was a bit like a "Roadster".

jamesj 12-30-15 03:36 PM

Hey guys still on the look out for a pair of these adjusters for my 3 speed.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/428/20...b339f2cd_z.jpg

redfoxdogs 12-30-15 03:56 PM


Originally Posted by CuttersRidge (Post 18422559)
That Royal Enfield is indeed, dashing, that company has flair, as to the other topic at hand, I always called them Butcher Bikes. That CCM is fine as well.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5016/5...028302c5_z.jpg

And a modern company in Copenhagen calls themselves that (with an "and" in it):

Butchers & Bicycles

And work bikes and so on, they get called. Very nice to drive things around on.

I really could have used one of these in junior high. I rode my 3-speed to school every day with guitar, flute, piccolo, music for band, orchestra and guitar class and my books and lunch. It was very awkward. I rode with no hands or barely one, baskets front and back. I routinely got my pants caught in the chain when I forgot a rubber band. Mom was not happy with the tearing and chain grease. I probably should have found a guitar backpack, but I had an old cardboard case. Backpacks weren't really popular for girls until I was in high school.

nlerner 12-30-15 04:36 PM

One thing that's interesting about those small-front wheel carrier bikes is that they've been around for just about as long as the Raleigh Sports. Here's a page from the 1938 Raleigh catalog:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-M...ighCarrier.jpg

michaelz28 12-30-15 05:34 PM

schwinn called it a "cycle truck " [IMG]http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/h...pswf1vzcfd.jpg[/IMG]


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