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gster 11-11-17 04:57 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 19986459)
We can stop now, this is all out of line and we can't even consider locking this thread. Let's drop the politics or the moderator will make it so. No room for it on Remembrance day.

Here, I was offered this for 75 bux cdn today. It doesn't have a Brooks. Is it worth it?
Discuss...75 Superbe in very good nick, missing dimple and key.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/GZ...=w1604-h902-no

I agree. Let's not take the bait.
I'm not seeing the photo for some reason but $75.00 sounds reasonable as both a fix up or parts source.
Just have a look at the cost + shipping for a pair of axle lock washers.
When I first started working on these bikes I didn't know how proprietary all these parts were and would discard rusty nuts, indicators, cable housings etc.
Ten years ago I had access to several NOS parts bins from various bike shops/community bike shops etc.
Not so today.
Having a personal parts source is essential.

clubman 11-11-17 06:06 PM

Sorry you can't see it, I tried another path. Google photos is hit and miss. Are you on an Apple product? Lots of fun and games between the big guys.

You're entirely right about the parts. I just haven't got the time and energy to part out bikes. Gonna finish the bikes I have and call it a day.

gster 11-11-17 06:23 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 19987025)
Sorry you can't see it, I tried another path. Google photos is hit and miss. Are you on an Apple product? Lots of fun and games between the big guys.

You're entirely right about the parts. I just haven't got the time and energy to part out bikes. Gonna finish the bikes I have and call it a day.

No, a PC.
I'll try a restart.

thumpism 11-11-17 07:17 PM

It may not be leather, but are you certain it doesn't say "Brooks" on the back? They also produced non-leather types at a much lower price point.

Originally Posted by clubman (Post 19986461)
We can stop now, this is out of line and we can't even consider locking this thread. Let's drop the politics or the moderator will make it so. No room for it on Remembrance day.

Here, I was offered this for 75 bux cdn today. It doesn't have a Brooks. Is it worth it?
Discuss...75 Superbe in very good nick, missing dimple and key.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/hD...w1817-h1022-no


BigChief 11-11-17 09:28 PM

Pretty sure the saddle and center stand are aftermarket. Here's the 1975 catalog page:

http://www.jaysmarine.com/1975raleighcat_us_15_lg.jpg

SirMike1983 11-11-17 10:26 PM

That Trygg type center stand is a common upgrade for bikes of that period. I had one for a number of years on my Sports. Eventually the shell cracked and I replaced it with an ESGE Type A stand. The center stand is good if you need a bike that parks straight up - parking next to a sign post, or a bike rack end, etc.

I took the Raleigh export DL-1 for a ride today. It was quite cold.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WacN3q0IB...111_153912.jpg

arty dave 11-12-17 01:26 AM

Sir Mike - It's green! Wow, nice green, it looked black in your workshop photos. How did it ride with the new spindle?

I swapped over the drum shoes so the better working set (with more braking compound) is now cleaned, de-glazed, and in the front drum. The combo is much more confidence inspiring, but I still have to be aware of steeper hills, children riding towards me on my side of the bike path with no intention of moving, and dogs. A lot like riding with modern brakes, but with more anticipation. It was nice to stretch my legs on the open path - there weren't a lot of people out as it was very overcast and rained on my way home. 18 kms round trip. These grips are nice - a lot better on my hands than DARE grips I used to have on a sports that made my hands feel weird.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4524/...962db54d_b.jpgIMG20171112170723 by arty dave armour, on Flickr

The shoe sets are a bit different to each other, and the set I initially thought was OK is actually quite worn compared to the rear. Different compounds too - one has bits of what looks like brass in it. *Please still let me know if modern drum shoes will fit on a vintage hub* and I'll start saving :)

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4567/...38ece0ff_c.jpgIMG20171112143907 by arty dave armour, on Flickr

gster 11-12-17 08:06 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 19986461)
We can stop now, this is out of line and we can't even consider locking this thread. Let's drop the politics or the moderator will make it so. No room for it on Remembrance day.

Here, I was offered this for 75 bux cdn today. It doesn't have a Brooks. Is it worth it?
Discuss...75 Superbe in very good nick, missing dimple and key.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/hD...w1817-h1022-no

I would think that's worth $50-$75.
Looks too good to part out.
I would do a makeover and gift it to a niece/neighbour etc.

gster 11-12-17 08:17 AM

2 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by arty dave (Post 19987455)
Sir Mike - It's green! Wow, nice green, it looked black in your workshop photos. How did it ride with the new spindle?

I swapped over the drum shoes so the better working set (with more braking compound) is now cleaned, de-glazed, and in the front drum. The combo is much more confidence inspiring, but I still have to be aware of steeper hills, children riding towards me on my side of the bike path with no intention of moving, and dogs. A lot like riding with modern brakes, but with more anticipation. It was nice to stretch my legs on the open path - there weren't a lot of people out as it was very overcast and rained on my way home. 18 kms round trip. These grips are nice - a lot better on my hands than DARE grips I used to have on a sports that made my hands feel weird.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4524/...962db54d_b.jpgIMG20171112170723 by arty dave armour, on Flickr

The shoe sets are a bit different to each other, and the set I initially thought was OK is actually quite worn compared to the rear. Different compounds too - one has bits of what looks like brass in it. *Please still let me know if modern drum shoes will fit on a vintage hub* and I'll start saving :)

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4567/...38ece0ff_c.jpgIMG20171112143907 by arty dave armour, on Flickr

They look like they should have good stopping power.
My experience is with this old Flying Pigeon.....
Drums front and back with minimal stopping power.
Attachment 588542

Attachment 588543
Obviously a Raleigh knock-off and a lot heavier....
In the 50's these were the Model T of China.

BigChief 11-12-17 08:54 AM


Originally Posted by arty dave (Post 19987455)
Sir Mike - It's green! Wow, nice green, it looked black in your workshop photos. How did it ride with the new spindle?

I swapped over the drum shoes so the better working set (with more braking compound) is now cleaned, de-glazed, and in the front drum. The combo is much more confidence inspiring, but I still have to be aware of steeper hills, children riding towards me on my side of the bike path with no intention of moving, and dogs. A lot like riding with modern brakes, but with more anticipation. It was nice to stretch my legs on the open path - there weren't a lot of people out as it was very overcast and rained on my way home. 18 kms round trip. These grips are nice - a lot better on my hands than DARE grips I used to have on a sports that made my hands feel weird.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4524/...962db54d_b.jpgIMG20171112170723 by arty dave armour, on Flickr

The shoe sets are a bit different to each other, and the set I initially thought was OK is actually quite worn compared to the rear. Different compounds too - one has bits of what looks like brass in it. *Please still let me know if modern drum shoes will fit on a vintage hub* and I'll start saving :)

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4567/...38ece0ff_c.jpgIMG20171112143907 by arty dave armour, on Flickr

Just a thought. I've found that my rod brakes need at least 2 1/2" of travel between the lever and handlebar grip to work well. The beat up roadster I fixed last year was well below that and would actually bottom out on the grip at full pressure. On a tip I got here, I bent the levers out another half inch or so and it made a big difference in braking power. I had the same issue with my scorcher when I added dual pivot calipers. The original Raleigh levers have barely enough travel. The rear brake was almost bottomed out at full pressure even with closely set pads. Again, thanks to a tip I got here, I eliminated a bit of wasted travel by cutting out 18" of cable housing by mounting cable stops on the top tube. That little bit of efficiency put the lever high enough off the grip at full brake that it made a big difference in braking power. So maybe a little added lever travel would help you get the most out of your drum brakes.
edit:
I think SirMikes bike is black. Looks like he has a green Birmingham style chainguard. Although, color on computers can be misleading.

gster 11-12-17 09:56 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19987735)
Just a thought. I've found that my rod brakes need at least 2 1/2" of travel between the lever and handlebar grip to work well. The beat up roadster I fixed last year was well below that and would actually bottom out on the grip at full pressure. On a tip I got here, I bent the levers out another half inch or so and it made a big difference in braking power. I had the same issue with my scorcher when I added dual pivot calipers. The original Raleigh levers have barely enough travel. The rear brake was almost bottomed out at full pressure even with closely set pads. Again, thanks to a tip I got here, I eliminated a bit of wasted travel by cutting out 18" of cable housing by mounting cable stops on the top tube. That little bit of efficiency put the lever high enough off the grip at full brake that it made a big difference in braking power. So maybe a little added lever travel would help you get the most out of your drum brakes.
edit:
I think SirMikes bike is black. Looks like he has a green Birmingham style chainguard. Although, color on computers can be misleading.

Available from Europe....
Not cheap
https://www.dutchbikebits.com/sturme...hub-brake-pads
Attachment 588553

gster 11-12-17 01:16 PM

Raleigh Factory
 
1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 588568

browngw 11-12-17 02:27 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Took SWAT (Sir Wayes A. Tonne) for its last ride this season. Road maintenance crews have started the dreaded salting already. Down to the warm dry basement till spring.

gster 11-12-17 02:29 PM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 19988263)
Took SWAT (Sir Wayes A. Tonne) for its last ride this season. Road maintenance crews have started the dreaded salting already. Down to the warm dry basement till spring.

You could deliver the mail while you're out.

SquidPuppet 11-12-17 02:40 PM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 19988263)
Took SWAT (Sir Wayes A. Tonne)

:roflmao2:

browngw 11-12-17 03:29 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19988268)
You could deliver the mail while you're out.


Those great bags were acquired on sale at MEC in the spring. Great for groceries and stuff, but I might be able to pick up a mail contract as well.

gster 11-12-17 03:46 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by browngw (Post 19988340)
Those great bags were acquired on sale at MEC in the spring. Great for groceries and stuff, but I might be able to pick up a mail contract as well.

I've got a pair of old leather saddlebags on the back of this 71 Hercules.
Yes, great for "groceries" (beer).
Attachment 588592

arty dave 11-12-17 03:51 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19987735)
Just a thought. I've found that my rod brakes need at least 2 1/2" of travel between the lever and handlebar grip to work well. The beat up roadster I fixed last year was well below that and would actually bottom out on the grip at full pressure. On a tip I got here, I bent the levers out another half inch or so and it made a big difference in braking power. I had the same issue with my scorcher when I added dual pivot calipers. The original Raleigh levers have barely enough travel. The rear brake was almost bottomed out at full pressure even with closely set pads. Again, thanks to a tip I got here, I eliminated a bit of wasted travel by cutting out 18" of cable housing by mounting cable stops on the top tube. That little bit of efficiency put the lever high enough off the grip at full brake that it made a big difference in braking power. So maybe a little added lever travel would help you get the most out of your drum brakes.
edit:
I think SirMikes bike is black. Looks like he has a green Birmingham style chainguard. Although, color on computers can be misleading.

Now that you mention it BC, I vaguely remember that too, thanks I'll do that.

When I was painting the DL-1 frame the black always looked a murky-grey green kinda black, it took me a while to realise it was just the reflection of the grey green garage colour. I like Raleigh greens. I was tempted to paint the DL-1 green.


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19987840)

Gster yeah the 90mm replacements are US$40 and then postage on top :( I couldn't find them much cheaper anywhere else...and I assume they would fit the '65 hub shell, but it would be nice to know for sure. I might shoot them an email asking for some dimensions.

SirMike1983 11-12-17 04:36 PM

It does look black in my garage - the lighting in there is pretty primitive. But it's actually a very dark green color (I think I've seen this called "Superbe Green"). The chainguard is a slightly lighter shade of green and has a star stamp pressed into the corner of it. Someone must have dumped the original chain case (the bolt is even still in the boss) in favor of this chain guard. I actually prefer this style of guard over the chain case because it's much easier to work on the bike. This one even came with a 44 tooth front chainring mated to the long, old-style DL-1 crank arms to go easier in the chain case. But I'll be sticking with this guard for now.

The spindle is running well. It's a little longer than the original, but I've got everything together and running. I took a ride of about an hour's length before dark this evening.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2btcWa9HM...112_163148.jpg

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QXkRu4Yvr...112_155824.jpg

agmetal 11-12-17 05:04 PM


Originally Posted by 73emgee (Post 15867745)
Beautiful Hercules! Here is another classic quadrant shifter, rod brake equipped, with AW hub a 1949 Comrade Roadster Model, built by the Comrade Cycles Company Darlaston, England. If anyone had information about this company please let me know. More pictures on Flicker http://www.flickr.com/photos/73emgee...7624401628722/ Also on my blog Classic Three Speedshttp://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=329978http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=329979http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=329980

I'm curious, did you ever find out more about this bike? Specifically, any idea what the BB threading is? I have my eye on one locally with a weird project in mind

gster 11-12-17 05:04 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19988430)
It does look black in my garage - the lighting in there is pretty primitive. But it's actually a very dark green color (I think I've seen this called "Superbe Green"). The chainguard is a slightly lighter shade of green and has a star stamp pressed into the corner of it. Someone must have dumped the original chain case (the bolt is even still in the boss) in favor of this chain guard. I actually prefer this style of guard over the chain case because it's much easier to work on the bike. This one even came with a 44 tooth front chainring mated to the long, old-style DL-1 crank arms to go easier in the chain case. But I'll be sticking with this guard for now.

The spindle is running well. It's a little longer than the original, but I've got everything together and running. I took a ride of about an hour's length before dark this evening.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2btcWa9HM...112_163148.jpg

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QXkRu4Yvr...112_155824.jpg

Fine looking machine.
I have one small note.
I think the fulcrum stop should be closer to the front.
It should be 2 1/4"- 2 1/2" back from the lug.
I have an unmolested Superbe in the garage that I use as a guide for placements/ cable lengths etc.
The chainguard is a good choice over a full case as it's much easier to service the rear hub, fix a flat etc.

gster 11-12-17 05:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by agmetal (Post 19988477)
I'm curious, did you ever find out more about this bike? Specifically, any idea what the BB threading is? I have my eye on one locally with a weird project in mind

Here's a nice one...

Attachment 588618

SirMike1983 11-12-17 06:51 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19988476)
Fine looking machine.
I have one small note.
I think the fulcrum stop should be closer to the front.
It should be 2 1/4"- 2 1/2" back from the lug.
I have an unmolested Superbe in the garage that I use as a guide for placements/ cable lengths etc.
The chainguard is a good choice over a full case as it's much easier to service the rear hub, fix a flat etc.

That's exactly right for how they are normally. The catalog images and the ones I've seen usually are like 2.5 inches back from the lug. For some reason, this one was set up like this, with the fulcrum farther back. It could be that's what people wanted or had in terms of cable housing lengths in the export market. It did come with its original, fixed-length cable. I ended up just copying how it was when I got it. My other bikes are all much closer to the front lug, and I'm like you in that I like them in the more frontward setting.

SirMike1983 11-12-17 06:59 PM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 19988263)
Took SWAT (Sir Wayes A. Tonne) for its last ride this season. Road maintenance crews have started the dreaded salting already. Down to the warm dry basement till spring.

Very nice condition on that bike - that's a keeper. You probably can't do much better on condition than that.

clubman 11-12-17 07:03 PM

Fulcrum position would be determined by the length of shifter cable, which came in different sizes for the myriad of models. Yours may be slightly shorter.

That's a Birmingham made mudguard on that Raleigh. I really like it too. :thumb:

Ballenxj 11-12-17 09:37 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19988486)
Here's a nice one...

Attachment 588618

What is going on with that rear hub? Can you post photos specifically of it? Looks almost like it has an engine? :foo:

Charmlessman 11-12-17 11:11 PM

Looking for advice
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hi all, first post in this forum. I rode a bike last time when I was 15 (now 38) and recently got back into it again. As I was browsing Craiglist I found a Raleigh LTD - 3 and started researching about this kind of bikes. Long story short I have now contacted 2 sellers in the Houston - Austin area and I would like to get your opinion on them:

Both bikes are Superbes, the cheapest is 90 but its very rusted and it is missing the Dynahub, the other ones is 200 but it looks in excellent condition (early 60s) and has the Dynahub , not sure about a key for locking fork.

I have zero experience working on bikes but find myself now with at least 30 days of free time until I start anew job.

Should I go with the cheaper one? How hard is it to work on these bikes?

johnnyspaghetti 11-13-17 05:10 AM

You have found the right place to be.
It would be better if folks could see more of the second bike which looks to be in real nice shape by looking at the rear of it. I see it doesn't have original pedals.
It shouldn't matter what you pay if that is what you want.
$200 is not too much-a good deal a Dynahub equipped w/forklock if thats what your after. The fork lock is code stamped on the lock cylinder face that provides info to get a dup key.
The first Superbe appears to be a 1969'-72' shown is rough looking and you could find one in better shape under $100. It does look to be all there and may ride very well after getting your fingers dirty.

The second Superbe pictured all i can see is other than original pedal gone & a nice reflector-paint back there. Some sellers are thinking these bikes are rare investments, not really. It would be always be better to have the original parts intact, don't make it a rule. Original parts seem to be out there.

Don't be afraid to travel a couple a hundred miles for a better bike or one you want.

gster 11-13-17 05:32 AM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 19989064)
Hi all, first post in this forum. I rode a bike last time when I was 15 (now 38) and recently got back into it again. As I was browsing Craiglist I found a Raleigh LTD - 3 and started researching about this kind of bikes. Long story short I have now contacted 2 sellers in the Houston - Austin area and I would like to get your opinion on them:

Both bikes are Superbes, the cheapest is 90 but its very rusted and it is missing the Dynahub, the other ones is 200 but it looks in excellent condition (early 60s) and has the Dynahub , not sure about a key for locking fork.

I have zero experience working on bikes but find myself now with at least 30 days of free time until I start anew job.

Should I go with the cheaper one? How hard is it to work on these bikes?

I would opt for the better of the the two as well.
The more complete and original the better.
Leather seat? Pump. etc?
These add value.
Please post some more photos.

BigChief 11-13-17 06:45 AM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 19989064)
Hi all, first post in this forum. I rode a bike last time when I was 15 (now 38) and recently got back into it again. As I was browsing Craiglist I found a Raleigh LTD - 3 and started researching about this kind of bikes. Long story short I have now contacted 2 sellers in the Houston - Austin area and I would like to get your opinion on them:

Both bikes are Superbes, the cheapest is 90 but its very rusted and it is missing the Dynahub, the other ones is 200 but it looks in excellent condition (early 60s) and has the Dynahub , not sure about a key for locking fork.

I have zero experience working on bikes but find myself now with at least 30 days of free time until I start anew job.

Should I go with the cheaper one? How hard is it to work on these bikes?

Welcome! I do have one bit of important advice for you. These bikes come in 2 different frame sizes. 21" and 23". If you are a taller person, say 5'10" or more, I would limit any purchase to the taller 23" framed bikes. Even in crummy craigslist photos, it's easy to see what frame size it is by looking at the steering tube length. The difference is obvious.

here's a 23"
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4524/...24cc91d4_b.jpg73 sports800 by Billy Bones, on Flickr

here's a 21"
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4257/...9e74a89e_b.jpgsprite_may_16 by Billy Bones, on Flickr


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