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-   -   How simply do you live? (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=163801)

I-Like-To-Bike 06-24-11 04:08 AM


Originally Posted by Artkansas (Post 12832417)
Assumptions, assumptions, assumptions.

In many communities there isn't a stream nearby. I lived near to Bear Creek for 8 years. Barely saw a drop of water in it. Sometimes none at all for over a year at a time.:crash:

:lol: :lol: :lol:

You are assuming the stream has to be nearby. Whatz da matter with riding or walking to the nearest stream no matter how far away it is? Or don't wash clothes until you do see a drop of water. Sounds pretty simple to me.

Whatz wid dis clean clothes fetish anyhow?

Roody 06-24-11 12:43 PM


Originally Posted by Ekdog (Post 12833510)
I do the same. No vinegar smell.

Regarding washing clothes by hand: I imagine that using a washing machine requires less water. I know that's the case with dishes. A dishwasher is much more efficient than washing up by hand.

It doesn't take much water to wash clothes by hand, but it sure takes a lot to rinse them. Hand washing is not recommended if you want to conserve water.

Roody 06-24-11 12:45 PM


Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike (Post 12833663)
You are assuming the stream has to be nearby. Whatz da matter with riding or walking to the nearest stream no matter how far away it is? Or don't wash clothes until you do see a drop of water. Sounds pretty simple to me.

Whatz wid dis clean clothes fetish anyhow?

Down by the river
Mama washes my shirt.
She has to use a stone
To knock out the dirt.
The river is shallow
The kids splash about
And when it's time for supper
Mama has to pull us out!

bluefoxicy 06-30-11 07:06 PM


Originally Posted by Alekhine (Post 1996621)
As for a bed, I prefer to sleep on the floor with my Thermarest and a couple of comfy blankets because my back likes a very firm underlying surface. My time spent in tents put this oddball thing into me. I'm going to be getting a kakebuton and a Japanese futon (shikibuton) soon though, because I've grown fond of them. (It's not what we think of as a futon in the US - which is a sort of hybrid couch/bed. A Japanese futon is a thin wool-filled cotton mattress that trifolds and stows in a closet or large cupboard, with a big, heavy, warm quilted comforter that does the same.)

I've thought about going japanese-style a lot, and I have no furniture; sit in seiza in front of computer. Problem is I was using air mattresses and they died, and then I bought a $1000 bed after not sleeping for like 4 days :notamused: and now my parents bought me this bed frame (bed was a box spring + mattress on the floor), which has made the bed harder to get into as I have to climb onto it.

bluefoxicy 06-30-11 08:22 PM


Originally Posted by Roody (Post 12835654)
It doesn't take much water to wash clothes by hand, but it sure takes a lot to rinse them. Hand washing is not recommended if you want to conserve water.

I use a Laundry Alternative spin drier, and do one rinse in a few gallons of water. The spin dryer removes most of the water (and detergent, which is dissolved in the water, and which oils are dissolved into), so I get soapy water out. A washing machine does the same: toss clothes from the front loader into the damn thing and it'll squeeze out soapy water.

Smallwheels 06-30-11 10:39 PM


Originally Posted by bluefoxicy (Post 12863707)
...bed frame (bed was a box spring + mattress on the floor), which has made the bed harder to get into as I have to climb onto it.

Are you just two feet tall? I use a mattress without a box spring or a bed frame. It makes it easier for my miniature dachshund to jump on and off of it. I don't climb into it. I just squat way down to get on it.


Originally Posted by bluefoxicy (Post 12864074)
I use a Laundry Alternative spin drier, and do one rinse in a few gallons of water. The spin dryer removes most of the water (and detergent, which is dissolved in the water, and which oils are dissolved into), so I get soapy water out. A washing machine does the same: toss clothes from the front loader into the damn thing and it'll squeeze out soapy water.

What type of spin dryer do you have? Is it electric or powered by hand? How many pieces of clothing can it hold? Is it portable and small like the Wonder Wash machine?

Platy 07-01-11 12:27 AM


Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 12864604)
Are you just two feet tall? I use a mattress without a box spring or a bed frame. It makes it easier for my miniature dachshund to jump on and off of it. I don't climb into it. I just squat way down to get on it.

I'd like to comment on this because I have to stand on tippytoes to climb into our bed. Mattresses have become very thick over the past 15 years. At the Bed Bath & Beyond online store, the majority of fitted sheet offerings are for mattresses that are 18 inches thick. Add 8 inches for a standard box spring and 8 inches for a bed frame, and you get a sleeping surface that's 34 inches off the floor. The average American male inseam is 34 inches, so there are a very substantial number of people who could have a bit of difficulty getting into that kind of bed.

One result of this situation is that low profile box springs with a 4 inch thickness are becoming more popular. You might wonder, what's the point of making mattresses thicker and box springs thinner. I guess it's just one of those marketing fashions.

bluefoxicy 07-01-11 06:47 AM


Originally Posted by Smallwheels (Post 12864604)
What type of spin dryer do you have? Is it electric or powered by hand? How many pieces of clothing can it hold? Is it portable and small like the Wonder Wash machine?

Electric, I got the larger model. 3200 RPM spin speed, pretty small. 400W, clothes go in, run for 3 minutes, shut off, remove clothes. They hang to dry for about an hour or so.

It won't hold a queen sized comforter, just barely too small. It'll hold quite a bit, though. The power usage is minimal, far less than running a window AC unit or a vacuum cleaner.

Floor to the top of my mattress is about 30-32 inches. My feet hang about a foot off the ground if I sit off the edge, so I have to jump down. Getting a knee up on the bed or whatnot isn't doable without lifting my entire body mass... there's no way to get on the bed without lifting myself. Mattress + box spring on the ground was pretty level, to the point that I'd just slide onto and off of the bed with no lifting and no impact with the ground.

bluefoxicy 07-01-11 06:49 AM


Originally Posted by Platy (Post 12864819)
One result of this situation is that low profile box springs with a 4 inch thickness are becoming more popular. You might wonder, what's the point of making mattresses thicker and box springs thinner. I guess it's just one of those marketing fashions.

More expensive, same margin %, more total profit. Of course marketing lets you bull**** people into thinking they can feel the bottom layer 3 feet down. Well, maybe because you have two 350lb fat lardasses on the mattress now, versus me at 143 by myself....

I-Like-To-Bike 07-01-11 07:14 AM


Originally Posted by bluefoxicy (Post 12865385)
...versus me at 143 by myself....

Living the simple life, eh?

Platy 07-01-11 07:57 AM

Antique American beds (circa 1920s) were often a full 36 inches high. Step stools were used to get in and out.

zoltani 07-01-11 09:47 AM


Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike (Post 12865449)
Living the simple life, eh?


That's some serious trolling, not that you don't just troll the threads normally, but you've sunk to a new low IMO.

Neil_B 07-01-11 10:04 AM


Originally Posted by zoltani (Post 12866210)
That's some serious trolling, not that you don't just troll the threads normally, but you've sunk to a new low IMO.

As opposed to insulting the obese, which is standard practice on Bike Forums.

zoltani 07-01-11 10:14 AM

That too....

was not cool

I-Like-To-Bike 07-01-11 10:27 AM


Originally Posted by zoltani (Post 12866355)
That too....

was not cool

Tell us again for the umpteenth time how cool it is to boast about shedding/avoiding material possessions, family obligations and simply living physically, socially and mentally in the equivalent of a cave.

It is obvious from the posts on this list, that at least for a sizable slice of posters, "Simple life" means No Spouse Responsibilities, No Children Responsibilities, No Likelihood to ever have either, nor any empathy for those people who do have those responsibilities.

zoltani 07-01-11 10:50 AM

Your post makes no sense..... I was replying to Neil...

FWIW I am married, have responsibilities, and personally don't give a **** how you want to live your life.

zoltani 07-01-11 11:13 AM

Looks like there are quite a few with spouses and responsibilities. Living simply doesn't have to stop when you get a partner or kids. Have you visited any simple living blogs? There are quite a few written by mothers that are really good reads.

I especially think that it is worth reading what newspaperguy said below (bolded)



Originally Posted by phillyskyline (Post 10863436)
I don't think this thread was meant to be a p*ssing contest or philosophy lesson, and personally, I don't feel that anyone here is bragging or trying to make others feel guilty about their life choices. I happen to be one of the folks Roody is referring to who is trying to simplify and declutter my life, and I'm just interested to see how other people live. It's inspiring in some cases, and in others it makes me realize that I do enjoy the stuff I have, like my ridiculously large house, my pets, my cooking equipment, and of course, my bikes :)


Originally Posted by Curious LeTour (Post 10920693)
Comparing for the sake of competing is futile. Those of us into voluntary simplicity know this. Comparing for the sake of learning is beneficial, in my opinion.

I'd love to live car free, but I use my compact pick up to haul tools and brush to earn a living. I work for a company, so I can't choose to use a bike for that purpose.

Also, the woman that I'm in a relationship with does not live with me. Even though she loves to ride mountain bikes and cross bikes, she prefers to use an automobile for transportation 95% of the time.

She also likes riding horse, and I formerly trained horses for a living. Now I'm feeling the urge to purchase a horse again. I'm feeling motivated to do this for two reasons. The first is that it would be something that would bring us closer together. The second is that I struggled with self esteem issues earlier this year, and training a young horse would make me feel special and confident to some extent.

On the other hand, I don't want to pay for a horse, the stall rent, the extra fuel, and the tack. I've already purchased a trailer. I feel like it is a slide back into mainstream competition and consumerism.

It is great to read these posts and see where people draw the lines for themselves, and why they draw them.


Originally Posted by Newspaperguy (Post 10920940)
Simplicity does not necessarily mean getting rid of everything except for the most meagre of essentials. Simplicity, the way I see it, is about stripping out the clutter from life, getting rid of the non-essentials.

On a material level, it may involve downsizing, getting rid of possessions which have no purpose in one's life and avoiding expensive hobbies or habits. On a personal level, it also may mean stepping away from commitments which drain time and energy.

However, simplicity for one person may not be simplicity for another. My version of a simple lifestyle for me as a single person is completely different than a simple lifestyle for a couple, and a couple's version of simplicity is not the same as that of a family with children. Someone who works as an independent trades person will have need for tools and transportation different from an employee in an office or a retired person.

The point is that a horse, while not part of my simple lifestyle, may fit in to yours. Meanwhile, I may have things in my simple lifestyle which would be unnecessary in yours.

There is no one right method here, simply because each of us has different needs and different circumstances.


Originally Posted by proethele (Post 6561937)
Interesting thread - my fiancee & I have long been talking about how we have far too much stuff, now we are motivated to do something about it. I would love to go car-free one day, but it's a bit more difficult in the Midwest than along the Northeast Corridor (when you're surrounded by farmland, they just keep building out.) Plus, my fitness level needs to come up quite a bit before that's viable ;) .

As far as dumpster diving - I don't do it personally (I'm a bit of a "germ freak"), but I used to have a job delivering to grocery stores. When a product is expired, the store usually pulls it off the shelves and puts it in the "back room" to be returned to the delivery man / distributor for a partial credit. 99% of the time, the delivery man just needs a count of the items, or the UPC code - often, they will just tear off the UPC code and chuck the items in the store's dumpster. I used to see quite a few people dumpster diving (often with the manager's blessing) and it wasn't unusual for them to pull out loads of canned goods, prepackaged coffee cakes/donuts, bread, etc. that were just one day past the expiration date - the cans/boxes were still sealed, just the UPC code was missing. Unless the manufacturer's have found a way to make the food magically turn rancid on midnight of the expiration date, that stuff is perfectly edible if the packaging isn't compromised. Meat & produce are a bit trickier, but I know people who've done it - one tip is to look for large bags of produce (it's not unusual to find a whole large bag of oranges/apples/onions/potatoes/etc. that was thrown out because just one of them got squished). It's not for me, but I do agree that this country wastes a ton of food that could easily go to people who need it...


Originally Posted by TheFool (Post 6100443)
Thanks Big2Wheeler and ataraxium. No sense in trying to be some kind of purist. Nothing wrong with comprimise. My wife and I live far away from where each of us currently works (and therefore we each drive) so that we can each do interesting and meaningful work and make enough to save for the future, but also live in a good community where we can work by ourselves and with neighbors on local self sufficiency and sustainability. Self sufficiency is a contradiction, really, you need to be part of some kind of local system or community. Any changes in how we all live are not going to happen by everyone radically changing overnight. Changes will be small and, I hope, be part of an integrated way of improving our towns and neighborhoods, along many dimensions.


zoltani 07-01-11 11:23 AM

To me, I-Like-To-Bike, you seem like the kind of person that is unhappy with the way you live (and feel you are powerless to change it) and when you come in here and read a thread like this you see everything as an attack on you. You may live simply given your personal responsibilities or you may not. In fact we don't know, because all you do is berate those that post about their own experiences instead of sharing your own. As newspaperguy says, simple living is different for different people that have different responsibilities. That is what makes this thread interesting. There are people from all walks of life, all with different situations and responsibilities, and it is interesting and helpful to some of us to read about their idea of simplicity.

IMO some of the things that people do for simplicity is not simple at all, for example washing clothes by hand. It is simpler to just throw them in a machine. But that is my opinion, someone else can have a different one. How do you judge if something is "simple"? Is it the time it takes? The money needed to do it? How much time do you have to work to pay for the washing machine, electricity, soap, etc versus the time sink of washing by hand? We all make our choices, and we don't have to agree on those choices.

People often implore you, I-Like-To-Bike, to actually contribute to the thread. Tell us how you live and what you consider simple living, given your responsibilities and personal situation. Or are you even interested in trying to simplify your life?

How do you expect us to empathize with you if you do not actually share your life and experiences with us?

I-Like-To-Bike 07-01-11 11:51 AM


Originally Posted by zoltani (Post 12866677)
To me, I-Like-To-Bike, you seem like the kind of person that is unhappy with the way you live (and feel you are powerless to change it) and when you come in here and read a thread like this you see everything as an attack on you. [SNIP]
How do you expect us to empathize with you if you do not actually share your life and experiences with us?

Share life experiences with an arm chair Interwebs psychiatrist like yourself? Don't make me laff.

Try reading with an open mind instead of through your hazy crystal ball and you might actually understand the content of what people post instead of some goofy scheme it "seems like" to you.

zoltani 07-01-11 12:05 PM


Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike (Post 12866837)
Share life experiences with an arm chair Interwebs psychiatrist like yourself? Don't make me laff.

From your past posts I didn't really expect you to.

Roody 07-01-11 12:46 PM

This has been a sane and civil thread for several years. I hope people will choose to ignore the one person who occasionally tries to ruin the thread. Responding to him in any fashion is not an effective tactic, in my lengthy experience. This is definitely a place for the "simple" tactic of non-violent non-participation.

zoltani 07-01-11 12:54 PM

Indeed.

I don't know what got into me.

I-Like-To-Bike 07-01-11 01:47 PM


Originally Posted by zoltani (Post 12866907)
From your past posts I didn't really expect you to.

And where is YOUR Simple Life story, Herr Freud?

zoltani 07-01-11 01:56 PM

I've been posting in this thread for a few years, if you're interested go back and read them.

Platy 07-01-11 03:36 PM


Originally Posted by Neil_B (Post 12866316)
As opposed to insulting the obese, which is standard practice on Bike Forums.

The Internet offers equal opportunity insulting for everyone!

Neil_B, if it makes any difference, weight wise I'm much closer to you than bluefoxicy. Us clydes can just keep riding and prove every day that bumblebees can fly regardless of what anyone else thinks.


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