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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

CV-6 08-03-19 12:14 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21058133)
I never would have thought of that in a million years. In a box, I am.

DD

Don't feel bad. I didn't figure that bit of info out for myself. But it sure is great to be able to pass it on.

jimmuller 08-03-19 12:34 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21058137)
None, actually - the tires that came on the Bianchi are in super shape, but the front is mounted opposite the rear and you know me and my OCD.

I can sympathize. I hate it when the front tire goes forward and the rear tire goes backwards. I never seem to get anywhere when that happens. I end up having to flip the rear wheel around.

DiabloScott 08-03-19 03:13 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21056951)
I've taped but never glued tubulars. Think I'd like to stick with the tape. What say all of you?

Advantages of tape: it's easy and not as messy if you're a tubular noob.

Advantages of glue: you decide how much is enough, you can just not put glue in the "easy to remove" section, you can put more glue on top of old glue, much easier to remove old glue, MUCH easier to replace a tire on the road, the satisfaction of having an old-school skill.

trailangel 08-03-19 03:19 PM

You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

iab 08-03-19 03:34 PM


Originally Posted by trailangel (Post 21058387)
You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

Use the tape in your jersey pocket?

CV-6 08-03-19 03:38 PM


Originally Posted by trailangel (Post 21058387)
You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

The first time I did have a flat on a taped tire, all the tape stayed on the tire. Last time was as you described. I carry some tape wrapped around a flat piece of plastic and a small knife. You put tape in the gaps and peel back part of the "cover" as you do when installing new. It can be difficult mounting the spare straight due to the "old" tape on the rim, but usually the idea is to get home, so it doesn't have to be perfect. Once mounted, remove the "cover" tape as in a new install.

jimmuller 08-03-19 03:48 PM

I find that swapping a glued tire is pretty quick most of the time. Would tape be faster or slower?

Drillium Dude 08-03-19 06:09 PM


Originally Posted by jimmuller (Post 21058418)
I find that swapping a glued tire is pretty quick most of the time. Would tape be faster or slower?

I'm retired so I'm not in a hurry anymore :)

I like the idea of carrying a spare tape roll in the tool bag. Why not? Light stuff.

DD

top506 08-03-19 06:41 PM

When I got back into sew-ups I tried tape for the first few sets, but went back to glue. It's really no big deal.

Top

qcpmsame 08-03-19 07:40 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21058137)
None, actually - the tires that came on the Bianchi are in super shape, but the front is mounted opposite the rear and you know me and my OCD. Besides, I always overhaul a bike that's new to me and I don't know if I can trust the old glue.

DD

Umm, its CDO, at least get the alphabetical order correct:innocent:

As to the current question, glue or tape, still gluing after all these years (apologies to Paul Simon.) Just never saw a reason to switch, and buying bulk flux brushes makes it easier than it ever was back when it was finding a hardware store or plumbing supply with someone stock.

Bill

Drillium Dude 08-04-19 02:14 AM


Originally Posted by qcpmsame (Post 21058714)
Umm, its CDO, at least get the alphabetical order correct:innocent:

As to the current question, glue or tape, still gluing after all these years (apologies to Paul Simon.) Just never saw a reason to switch, and buying bulk flux brushes makes it easier than it ever was back when it was finding a hardware store or plumbing supply with someone stock.

Bill

You know, it's funny but tape is the way I learned, too. I first ran tubulars in 1994 while in London, and since I didn't trust myself with making an indestructible bond between rim and tire, I had Condor Cycles tape up all my tires - that was their go-to method even back then. They removed and replaced them the 3/4 times I flatted them, too. So I never dealt with the icky part :)

But taping up the tubulars a couple months back was fun and I guess I can hope for the best that I don't puncture. I won't be running them all that often since they'll only be on one bike and I do a pretty good job rotating through at least 5 or 6 of them.

DD

smontanaro 08-04-19 04:58 AM

I've never used tape so can't comment on the relative ease of changing a flat. I have had tires which the PO had taped. Small PITA to get the little leftover nubs of tape off.

As for the no-glue-opposite-the-valve trick. I'm aware of it but never seen to remember to it while I'm applying glue to the rim. Hasn't been an issue removing the (thankfully rare) flat so far.

DiabloScott 08-04-19 12:03 PM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 21058949)

As for the no-glue-opposite-the-valve trick. I'm aware of it but never seen to remember to it while I'm applying glue to the rim. Hasn't been an issue removing the (thankfully rare) flat so far.

I don't do it either, I have an old tire lever in my cycling wallet to get the removal started if necessary. And I am always a little surprised at how hard they are to get off... a testament to my glue jobs.

markwesti 08-04-19 04:34 PM

It was a good day my friends . Got my Campy/Nisi wheels back from the LBS and they did a fine job lacing . The tires I'm using are NOS Giro d' Italia . I do my own thing when gluing , maybe it will bite me someday maybe not . I 1 coat the tire and rim , let dry and then 1 coat tire and rim and mount . Using (this time) Challenge mastic , it's a Italian build so Italian glue . Previously I had been using 3M Fast Tack , 1 thick coat on the rim and tire and mount . Never a problem . Many beers ago I used to let my buddy (Psycho Billie) ride one of my bikes and it had tubulars , anyway we had one mile to go after a 60 miler and Billie gets a flat . Typical Billie he flies into a rage and then starts crying , I'm like Billie no big deal I can fix it . At the time I was using tape and a Co2 cartridge for air . So I got to work , Billie was silent (for once) he had never seen tape and never filled with Co2 .
Anyhow the second picture with the blue tape is for holding the tire valve stem straight while pulling on the tire , works good .


https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...a6ae09b6_z.jpg
IMG_0401 by mark westi, on Flickr
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...fd24e4ae_z.jpg
IMG_0403 by mark westi, on Flickr

Wileyone 08-04-19 05:00 PM


Originally Posted by Drillium Dude (Post 21057186)
Since I have a lot of Dremel experience (!) I will try a wire brush attachment on it and go from there. Thanks for the suggestion!

The tape job I did recently for another Forum member was easy-peasy. Made it super-simple to locate the tire exactly where we wanted it, then you just pull the protective tape off and you're all set. Bob Freeman says tape holds much better, too - tho that can be a bit of a hassle when getting a tub off, I suppose.

DD

Don't use a Dremel tool.

Use one of these.

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...89e7634296.jpg

qcpmsame 08-04-19 06:18 PM

Just use some Goof Off and a rag to remove the mastic from the rims. Using a brush on a drill just sprays the bits hither and yon. Usually the hither is various components and the yon is one of my eyes, that's why I use safety glasses.

Bill

RobbieTunes 08-04-19 06:41 PM


Originally Posted by trailangel (Post 21058387)
You won't like tape when you need to remove tire on the road because of a flat. Half the tape will stick to the tire and the other half to the rim... randomly. Then how do you mount your spare?

I use tape exclusively, and have never had that problem. It always stuck to the rim. So much that I've twice forgotten to re-tape.

seedsbelize 08-04-19 08:35 PM

I have read the entire thread, in about a week. Seems like something I'd like to try. Ideally I would go YJ, cheap, to learn the ropes and see if I like it. Actually, I live in Mexico and, though they might ship here, and they might actually arrive, there would be duty to pay.
I will search out a wheel, or rim set preferably. And I will see what glue is available. Tires are not cheap here. Even cheap tires are not cheap. Slow and steady.

jimmuller 08-05-19 05:00 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize (Post 21060045)
I have read the entire thread, in about a week.

Something to do when it's too hot to ride?

If you do try sewups, make sure they have removable valve cores so you can squirt some Stan's Tire Seal in them. Also check out TireAlert.com. Or consider that patching sewups is something else to do when it's too hot to ride.

jimmuller 08-05-19 05:03 AM


Originally Posted by qcpmsame (Post 21059858)
Just use some Goof Off and a rag to remove the mastic from the rims.

Just make sure you get the can with the handy-dandy well-ventilated area included in the box.

qcpmsame 08-05-19 06:02 AM


Originally Posted by jimmuller (Post 21060321)
Just make sure you get the can with the handy-dandy well-ventilated area included in the box.

Working garage door, functioning fan and operable window all are there, and get used every time.

I use an off the shelf contact cement to glue my tubs on, DAP, Weldtite contact cement. The 3M product used for so many years was discontinued, I understand its been reformulated now, however. Works just as well as the tire manufacturers' branded stuff, and costs a fraction of the price. Hardware stores and the big box home improvement stores have to on their shelves in several sizes, acid flux brushes come from Amazon, in bulk.

Bill

WGB 08-07-19 05:47 PM

Just got 5 tubular rims , two sets and a spare for $20 total. This will be my first attempt at tubulars.

One set of Campagnolo Record rims has mismatched tires, red and black. Only one of the Nasbar set has a tire and it's black. Is it worth it to try and remove these tires so I can have a matched set??

Asking because new tubulars add up.

WGB 08-07-19 05:58 PM

Also rims were previously glued and most spoke holes had been filled with a clear silicone type substance (to ensure they are sealed?). What can I use to fill the holes? I cleaned the rim surfaces and now they are clear but also stripped out theat silicone type stuff.

79pmooney 08-07-19 06:30 PM

I don't know what that clear silicon was put there for. Never heard of it being don.e Never did it or needed it. I'd just ignore it.

iab 08-07-19 06:42 PM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize (Post 21060045)
Ideally I would go YJ, cheap, to learn the ropes and see if I like it.

You won't like it if you use the YJ tires. I would recommend not using tubulars if that is your plan.

YJ tires are perfectly acceptable as a spare, nothing else.

iab 08-07-19 06:45 PM


Originally Posted by WGB (Post 21065117)
Also rims were previously glued and most spoke holes had been filled with a clear silicone type substance (to ensure they are sealed?). What can I use to fill the holes? I cleaned the rim surfaces and now they are clear but also stripped out theat silicone type stuff.

No need to fill any holes.

But if you must, there are mini corks made specifically for the job. I think they are silly, but if it floats your boat, by all means, knock yourself out.

WGB 08-07-19 07:10 PM

Won't fill holes then but assuming not worth effort transferring tire from one rim to another?

jimmuller 08-08-19 05:00 AM


Originally Posted by WGB (Post 21065212)
Won't fill holes then but assuming not worth effort transferring tire from one rim to another?

If the color mismatch bothers you then do it. It will be good practice for when you need to do a real tire installation.

But I would be more concerned about the quality of the tire than about its color. How old are they? How much tread do they have? Is the tread covered with a zillion tiny cuts from the previous owner's riding? Can you trust that they were glued well? What sort of tires are they anyway? If you are going to ride tubulars, you might as well ride good ones. You will need to know how to install a new one if you ever get a flat on the road that Stan's Tire Seal won't fix.

jcb3 08-08-19 05:45 AM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize (Post 21060045)
. Ideally I would go YJ, cheap, to learn the ropes and see if I like it.
.


Tufo S33 Pros are great starter tires - $30 each, nearly impossible to flat, last forever, and constructed such that sealant works very well.

Ride like gator skins, and not a lot of love to be found for TUFOs, but a good gateway to get over the fear of tubulars.

Iím now riding vittoria pave and like them a lot, although they only last me 1200 miles on a rear.

WGB 08-08-19 08:01 AM

jimmuller - tires are old but have no nicks or cuts. Previous owner had rebuilt hubs a year ago and then hardly ridden. Was thinking that besides aesthetics it would give me a cheaper chance to learn than maybe wrecking a new tire.


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