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-   -   Bikepacking/Cycle Touring Tent (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1205780)

indyfabz 06-29-20 03:40 PM

Iíll bet you guys look both ways before crossing the street. Live a little.:D But I did test fire the stove. After all, Iím not crazy.

djb 06-29-20 03:47 PM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21560331)
Iíll bet you guys look both ways before crossing the street. Live a little.:D But I did test fire the stove. After all, Iím not crazy.

chuckle

provably inside one of your tents right Evil Kneivel?

indyfabz 06-29-20 05:10 PM


Originally Posted by djb (Post 21560347)
chuckle

provably inside one of your tents right Evil Kneivel?

Itís ďEvelĒ, my Canadian friend. Hometown was Butte, MT, where I know a neat, retro motor lodge/hotel and where to get a great steak au poivre.

djb 06-29-20 06:11 PM

I have a rather clear memory of the excitement of that snake River canyon jump attempt he did, it might have even been live on tv. A long time ago in any case.
Evel. Probably knew that but hey, the brain's a collander for stuff like that sometimes.

zebkedic 06-29-20 06:52 PM


Originally Posted by reppans (Post 21559433)
I think BA fibs a bit... they spec 2lbs 5oz total for my FC UL2, but somehow my sample weighs 5oz more, then add another 5oz for the OEM footprint and itís 47oz. My pyramid, inner net tent, polycryo footprint, and stakes weighs 25oz, is more versatile and comfortable (for me), and it all packs into a 2.5L stuff sack. Free-standing poles are the big difference in bulk and weight.

Of course, to pack within 30L, you need minimalist gear, AND you need to heavily multitask. For example, I use Everclear for stove fuel, and with powdered ice tea mix, make Vodka Sweet Tea drinks (my Ďbarí); an Evernew/Sawyer bladder with spare cap w/holes drilled in is my daily íastronautí (<1L of water) Ďshowerí.

Pictures are worth a 1000 words: 5lb/10L of core camping gear and the creature comforts of that gear; add 14L for changes of clothing, camp sandals, 4 days food, and 1 gal water for backpacking out of a Deuter Trail 24L ..... or ADVMoto touring. This is the fan w/ timer set-up... optional depending upon weather forecast.

I mostly short bike-tour where a bike has the advantage over motor vehicles.... and thatís in densely populated urban and shoreline areas where parking, campgrounds, and accommodations are very difficult to find, crazy expensive, and/or impossible without reservations made long in advance. For that, I prefer a this 30L folding bike rig which can be wheeled inside like a baby stroller keeping it safe from theft, easily multi-modal, and also that I can hike/carry deep (up 1/2 mile) into the woods for stealth camping.

This will be my 26L gravel bike/bikepacking rig for rail trail/tow path touring (when I get around to it) but I donít like long-distance rural road touring like most of you.... Iíll rather take an ADVmoto for that. Hereís a specialized Bladepacking rig idea for true airline carry-on (incl room/board/transport) touring urban areas with good bike path infrastructures, ~ 2/3rds the efficiency of a bike (but I need brush-up my skate skills).

I also have a minivan rigged as stealth camper, a 16ft Feathercraft folding sea kayak, and Alpacka packraft that can all be mixed and matched in combination with the above.

Hope that covers it. If you keep it small, light, and stealth enough - a LOT more options open up for those infected with and outdoor wanderlust.

Great overview and photos! There are few times I would have loved to have had that fan, LOL. I might have to rig one of those up as well.

cyccommute 06-29-20 10:29 PM


Originally Posted by reppans (Post 21559433)
I think BA fibs a bit... they spec 2lbs 5oz total for my FC UL2, but somehow my sample weighs 5oz more, then add another 5oz for the OEM footprint and itís 47oz. My pyramid, inner net tent, polycryo footprint, and stakes weighs 25oz, is more versatile and comfortable (for me), and it all packs into a 2.5L stuff sack. Free-standing poles are the big difference in bulk and weight.

Of course, to pack within 30L, you need minimalist gear, AND you need to heavily multitask. For example, I use Everclear for stove fuel, and with powdered ice tea mix, make Vodka Sweet Tea drinks (my Ďbarí); an Evernew/Sawyer bladder with spare cap w/holes drilled in is my daily íastronautí (<1L of water) Ďshowerí.

Pictures are worth a 1000 words: 5lb/10L of core camping gear and the creature comforts of that gear; add 14L for changes of clothing, camp sandals, 4 days food, and 1 gal water for backpacking out of a Deuter Trail 24L ..... or ADVMoto touring. This is the fan w/ timer set-up... optional depending upon weather forecast.
.

There are a couple of things missing from your pictures. One is food. Thatís the bulk of my volume. My off-road tours are very remote with zero opportunity for resupply. If I donít carry it, Iím not eating it. The other item missing is clothing. My off-road tours also tend to be high which means that I have to be prepared for cold weather no matter what the calendar. Clothing has to be able to layer and be able to be ridden in (no long coats).

Another reason for my higher volume is also related the cold. I have a 45įF bag but I have never used it here in the Rockies. I might use it out on the plains but never high. Morning temperatures can be below freezing so I always carry a heavier 20į bag which also requires more volume.

Finally, I would never trust a frameless tent. Colorado weather is changeable and volatile. Wind gusts of 80 to 90 mph are not unknown. A tent held up by a stick is a tent that isnít going to be tent shaped for long. My latest camping trip was accompanied by winds strong enough to nearly wrap my tent around me with a frame. I wouldnít relish the idea of setting up a tent in the middle of the night.

indyfabz 06-30-20 03:20 AM


Originally Posted by djb (Post 21560589)
I have a rather clear memory of the excitement of that snake River canyon jump attempt he did, it might have even been live on tv. A long time ago in any case.
Evel. Probably knew that but hey, the brain's a collander for stuff like that sometimes.

It was broadcast live. My cousin and I watched all of the ďpre-gameĒ hype leading up to that complete fail.

mev 06-30-20 03:29 AM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21559847)
Going to try out my new REI Quarter Dome SL 2 later this week. Taking it on the road without ever taking it out of the sack. I like to live on the edge. :D

I did that once. First night camping on a long trip where I discovered I had a 1-person Hubba tent instead of a 2-person Hubba Hubba tent. It all worked out since I was the only one using it, but it was a surprise.

indyfabz 06-30-20 05:31 AM


Originally Posted by mev (Post 21561144)
I did that once. First night camping on a long trip where I discovered I had a 1-person Hubba tent instead of a 2-person Hubba Hubba tent. It all worked out since I was the only one using it, but it was a surprise.

My stuff sack reads "SL 2," and the drawstring looked factory-tied. It was ordered on line and shipped from an REI distribution warehouse, so I doubt it has ever been out of the sack since it was originally put in. But you never know.

Tourist in MSN 06-30-20 06:19 AM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21560331)
Iíll bet you guys look both ways before crossing the street. Live a little.:D But I did test fire the stove. After all, Iím not crazy.

Couple years ago while testing one of my liquid fuel stoves at home before my trip, tank would not hold pressure. Eventually decided it needed a new filler cap gasket, and this is not the 70s any more, no local stores stock small parts like that. So, a different stove went on that trip.



Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21561214)
My stuff sack reads "SL 2," and the drawstring looked factory-tied. It was ordered on line and shipped from an REI distribution warehouse, so I doubt it has ever been out of the sack since it was originally put in. But you never know.

A couple decades ago I was buying my first solo tent, I asked an REI employee if I could set it up on the floor in the store to see how big it was inside. Store was not very busy, he said sure and helped me. We got it set up and found several dead tree leaves inside the tent. He immediately said that I would get 20 percent off.

indyfabz 06-30-20 06:28 AM


Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN (Post 21561267)
Couple years ago while testing one of my liquid fuel stoves at home before my trip, tank would not hold pressure. Eventually decided it needed a new filler cap gasket, and this is not the 70s any more, no local stores stock small parts like that. So, a different stove went on that trip.

That very same thing happened to me a few years ago. Due to my neglect, a gasket in my Optimus Nova stove dried out and shriveled, preventing the buildup of pressure while pumping. Tried lubing it with butter, but it was too far gone. Good thing I tested it before the trip. Took the Dragonfly instead. I usually save that for tours longer than one week because the fuel bottle is larger. Eventually ordered a repair/replacement kit for the Nova that I found on Amazon. Thanks for reminding me that I should lube the gasket when I get back.

reppans 06-30-20 08:22 AM


Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 21561009)
There are a couple of things missing from your pictures. One is food. Thatís the bulk of my volume. My off-road tours are very remote with zero opportunity for resupply. If I donít carry it, Iím not eating it. The other item missing is clothing. My off-road tours also tend to be high which means that I have to be prepared for cold weather no matter what the calendar. Clothing has to be able to layer and be able to be ridden in (no long coats).

Another reason for my higher volume is also related the cold. I have a 45įF bag but I have never used it here in the Rockies. I might use it out on the plains but never high. Morning temperatures can be below freezing so I always carry a heavier 20į bag which also requires more volume.

Finally, I would never trust a frameless tent. Colorado weather is changeable and volatile. Wind gusts of 80 to 90 mph are not unknown. A tent held up by a stick is a tent that isnít going to be tent shaped for long. My latest camping trip was accompanied by winds strong enough to nearly wrap my tent around me with a frame. I wouldnít relish the idea of setting up a tent in the middle of the night.

I only detail my baseline core camping gear @ an SUL 5lbs/10L as thatís the minimum Iíll use for an overnight; a consistent core of every camping trip; and frankly the part that most folks just can not seem to believe (I think yourself included, and why we are having this conversation).

No big secrets in shrinking the bulk of clothing, food and water - thatís why I donít detail it, and instead specifically state, ďadd 14L for ____Ē to get to my 24L 4-day self-sufficient (except water) backpacking rig. Included in that 24L pack are merino long u/w & Buff, wind shirt & pants, camp sandals, spare socks & u/w, 4days freeze-dried food and 2L of water, plus another 2L water shown in the o/s pocket (for a dayís dry section on this trail).

The ADVmoto, folding bike, and gravel bike pics are even larger capacity (26-30L) than the backpacking rig although packed more loosely. Road/civilized touring, I typically swap food space for additional changes of clothing.

Yes, this is just a 1-2 season set-up, and Iím generally in the Northeast camping in dense forest. For 3 season, I have the 20F version of this poncho/quilt (with down hood) which adds ~10oz and 2.5L (so 27-33L), but otherwise my colder clothing would be worn with the carried long u/w and wind s/p representing 2 spare layers, or sleeping PJs, or another outfit while drying first.

After heavy expedition tents, pyramids are said to be very good wind/snow shelters with their steep walls and smaller surface area at height.... I can also pitch my fly higher for hot weather ventilation, or very low for storm/wind protection, and I can cherry pick the strength of my fallen branch pole. In serious wind, Iíd need to carve better stakes though. Personally, I trust this pryamid more than my Fly Creek UL2 in serious weather, but YMMV.

Tourist in MSN 06-30-20 09:58 AM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21561279)
... Thanks for reminding me that I should lube the gasket when I get back.

In my case it was for a filler cap on an old Optimus 111T, ordered some from a European supplier which means international $hipping. Unfortunately, that supplier did not have the ones I need for Phoebus stoves, so still looking for those. Things like that used to be stock spares in larger camping stores half a century ago.

Before a trip, anything mechanical that can fail, I test it. Does air mattress hold air, does stove work, put up the tent to make sure it is complete and functional, etc. Bike trips, kayak trips, canoe trips, backpacking trips, they all have their own unique potential modes of failure. Backpacking trip this year, I plan to use a new backpack, need to load that up and walk around near home for a few hours first.

Doug64 07-01-20 08:38 PM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21559847)
Going to try out my new REI Quarter Dome SL 2 later this week. Taking it on the road without ever taking it out of the sack. I like to live on the edge. :D


Your not living too close to the edge:) We've used a Quarter Dome 2 for a couple of years, and it is a good tent, and relatively easy to set up. You might count your tent stakes; it only comes with 9 stakes, and it needs 10. The newer version, SL2, may have fixed that problem, but it would not hurt to check. It would be nice if you could get a video of you setting up for the first time. It is usually interesting.

Have a good ride!

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...609243a0_b.jpg

joshtee 01-17-21 01:57 PM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21559847)
Going to try out my new REI Quarter Dome SL 2 later this week. Taking it on the road without ever taking it out of the sack. I like to live on the edge. :D

How did this tent end up working out for you? Likes or dislikes that stand out? I noticed the 'tub' or nylon before mesh starts seems pretty low. I can see how this would be good for ventilation, but seems if the was nylon higher it would cut down on wind going across your body. Or is this not a problem.

indyfabz 01-17-21 07:20 PM


Originally Posted by joshtee (Post 21882136)
How did this tent end up working out for you? Likes or dislikes that stand out? I noticed the 'tub' or nylon before mesh starts seems pretty low. I can see how this would be good for ventilation, but seems if the was nylon higher it would cut down on wind going across your body. Or is this not a problem.

Have only used it that one weekend. Stayed completely dry in a deluge the first afternoon. It poured for over 45 minutes. Like having side doors as opposed to one front door like my BA Fly Creek 2.

Biggest dislike is the size when packed. My tents go on the rack parallel with the rack. It sticks off the end father than I like, somewhat obscuring the rear light which bolts to the end of the rack. The stuff sack also seems to have a needlessly large diameter. As I think I noted in another post, Iíll probably only use it for flattish routes and save the lighter, smaller BA for hilly/mountainous routes.

Dr.Lou 01-19-21 11:01 PM

Another vote for the Fly creek. I ve been using a FC UL2 for several years and itís been a great tent -.Uber light. However, for a few ounces more the two-man version is a better choice. The Copper Spur is a great tent, just heavier.

Below is the two-man Fly Creek UL2.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b11a0ce51.jpeg

joshtee 01-20-21 11:25 PM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21882495)
Have only used it that one weekend. Stayed completely dry in a deluge the first afternoon. It poured for over 45 minutes. Like having side doors as opposed to one front door like my BA Fly Creek 2.

Biggest dislike is the size when packed. My tents go on the rack parallel with the rack. It sticks off the end father than I like, somewhat obscuring the rear light which bolts to the end of the rack. The stuff sack also seems to have a needlessly large diameter. As I think I noted in another post, Iíll probably only use it for flattish routes and save the lighter, smaller BA for hilly/mountainous routes.

Good info, thanks!

Has a tent that is 'Semi-Freestanding' ever been a problem for you?

cyccommute 01-20-21 11:47 PM


Originally Posted by joshtee (Post 21887407)
Good info, thanks!

Has a tent that is 'Semi-Freestanding' ever been a problem for you?

Which tent are you referring to as “semi-freestanding”? Both the Quarter Dome and the Fly Creek stand entirely on their own. The Quarter Dome has four corners while the Fly Creek only has three but they will both stand on their own.

indyfabz 01-21-21 05:14 AM


Originally Posted by joshtee (Post 21887407)
Good info, thanks!

Has a tent that is 'Semi-Freestanding' ever been a problem for you?

No. The BA is semi. Again ladt September I set the body up in an Adirondack shelter on the GAP to keep bugs at bay. Didnít have as much room as normal but also didnít need it since I didnít have to bring much inside. And obviously didnít need the fly. Did the same at 2 state parks in VT in 2018.

cyccommute 01-21-21 09:47 AM


Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 21887527)
No. The BA is semi. Again ladt September I set the body up in an Adirondack shelter on the GAP to keep bugs at bay. Didn’t have as much room as normal but also didn’t need it since I didn’t have to bring much inside. And obviously didn’t need the fly. Did the same at 2 state parks in VT in 2018.

Gonna have to disagree on the “semi-freestanding” thing. That implies that the tent has to have something other than the frame to keep it up. “Semi-freestanding” implies that the tent needs stakes and/or guy wires to hold it up. I stake my tent when I set it up but I stake every tent I’ve ever owned...even old Eureka Timberlines...because I’d rather not chase a tent during a wind.

That said, I can and have picked up the tent and moved it around after it is set up. Every morning, I pick up the tent by the frame and shake out any dirt and debris before I pack it. The tent needs nothing else to keep it erect.

robow 01-21-21 10:16 AM

When we say semi-freestanding, don't we mean that you have to stake out at least a portion of the tent to maximize the available floor space where as with freestanding tents it's not really necessary ?

indyfabz 01-21-21 11:50 AM


Originally Posted by robow (Post 21887841)
When we say semi-freestanding, don't we mean that you have to stake out at least a portion of the tent to maximize the available floor space where as with freestanding tents it's not really necessary ?

That is what I always understood it to mean; it will stand without steaks, but you won't get the maxim available space if you don't use at least some of the steaks. I can erect by BA Fly Creek without having to use steaks, but their is less room at the narrow end because steaks are required to maximize the floor space of the corners and to stretch it out to full length. REI describes this tent as semi-free standing. I have also seen it called that it several other descriptions and reviews.

imi 01-21-21 01:19 PM

Iíll usually just gloss over misspellings, but this one made me chuckle. Cheers Indy! ✌️😊

indyfabz 01-21-21 01:37 PM


Originally Posted by imi (Post 21888158)
Iíll usually just gloss over misspellings, but this one made me chuckle. Cheers Indy! ✌️😊

heh. Thanks for cutting me a ďbrake.Ē Iím still recovering from hand surgery to correct 3 fractures and ligament damage, including a complete evulsion.


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