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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BFisher 12-23-20 08:47 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 21846042)
BFisher What a lovely photo (and the bike's not bad either!)

Thanks! Occasionally I somehow manage to take a decent picture.

2fat2fly 12-24-20 03:46 AM


Originally Posted by oldspokes (Post 21845690)
Spotted these in that same general area:


Green Raleigh Sports
https://cnj.craigslist.org/bik/d/law...236113787.html

Ladies Sports
https://cnj.craigslist.org/bik/d/law...236128443.html

Clean looking Hercules
https://philadelphia.craigslist.org/...238702588.html

Raleigh in red
https://lancaster.craigslist.org/bik...234781366.html

Rough Hercules
https://baltimore.craigslist.org/bik...237919837.html

Raleigh Superbe
https://cnj.craigslist.org/bik/d/law...249771055.html

The Hercules on Philly CL is likely the cleanest looking of all of these with the Superbe at the end of the list looking pretty decent too.

Regardless of the ads being mixed up on the green and brown bikes, the only one in that list that looks like anything I'd want to own is the Hercules on Philadelphia CL, however its not my size.

I'm still debating whether or not I want to mess with the Sprite since it needs basically a full rebuild with new rear spokes. The Super Course idea has me thinking a bit but it sounds like an expensive undertaking considering it would mean building a set of wheels, finding fenders, handlebars, a 3 spd hub, and a saddle, not to mention hunting down a suitable older Super Course in my size. There was a 25 1/2" SC bare frame on CL a while back for $100, but the cost of building the wheels and finding the other parts would put it out of my budget these days. I figure $250 tops, for a bike in presentable and rideable shape. I really don't care to deal with rust or bad paint, or wheels that need rebuilding or replacing. The way I see it is that if I'm going to spend the money, it has to fit me and it might as well be what I want, which is a 26" Sports style model like I had years ago. If the Sprite was free or really cheap, I might take it and play around with making it into something I can use, otherwise I'll end up with far too much money in a bike I that's really not what I was looking for.

Jawihan 12-24-20 06:39 AM

BFisher Lovely bike, Do you have posted details of the build. I have a Super Course frame , I should build up. It needs painting ( some one previously had done a poor job of rattle canning it). I have a lot of the original parts.
Cheers, James

SirMike1983 12-24-20 08:59 AM


Originally Posted by BFisher (Post 21845959)
@IsleRide I also encourage you to go IGH on a Super Course. I love mine.
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1087930b36.jpg

Nice color on that frame.

BFisher 12-24-20 10:38 AM


Originally Posted by Jawihan (Post 21846432)
BFisher Lovely bike, Do you have posted details of the build. I have a Super Course frame , I should build up. It needs painting ( some one previously had done a poor job of rattle canning it). I have a lot of the original parts.
Cheers, James

Hi, James. I posted this here as I got it together. I had this bike built as a 3x7 with indexed downtube shifting, but decided the setup was redundant and didn't look the way I wanted the bike to look.

I made a trade with @cudak888 (Kurt) for two 3 speed hubs - one modern and one vintage. Ultimately I decided the older AW was the way I wanted to go, so I laced it to the original 27" rim with double butted stainless spokes. I put a newer production trigger shifter on, had the honey Brooks here already, and got a good deal on some SKS longboard fenders from REI. The chainring was a NOS score from ebay - 49 tooth - which is mated to a 22 tooth rear cog, giving me a nice range of about 45, 60, and 80 gear inches if my memory is correct. I have since put a Carradice saddle bag on, but don't have a pic yet.

The bike has been rock solid reliable, and really has a fantastic ride quality. It has been one of my faves this past season. Tires are 27x1 1/4 Continental UltraSports, which are a great tire for their price point. Perfect for these old hookless rims. I run them at around 70psi.

Brian

oldspokes 12-24-20 11:24 PM

I've been knocking around the idea of building this up with an AW or S5 hub. I've had it for 20 years or so now, its been hanging in the basement collecting dust. It definitely needs paint and decals. It takes 700c wheels, 27" won't allow fenders. I also haven't figured out which fenders and I need a set of alloy North Road bars for it and a short reach stem. 1 3/8" wide tires would be the limit, the fork and stays are pretty narrow. The big problem may also be finding room to keep another bike. My original plan was to use a modern SA 7 speed IGH but never found a deal on one and I had tried a Shimano Nexus 7 years ago and really didn't like it, mostly due to the weight it added.
The plan for this was to do a full repaint, some new decals, alloy north road bars, Raleigh grips, an SA hub, wide rims and the widest blackwall tires I can fit, metal fenders painted to match. The frame was built for center pull brakes, and I have no intention of removing the rear brake hanger, so a set of original Weinmann CP calipers are the way I'd go with matching brake levers.
Its just never been very high on my to-do list over the years so it just sat with the thought that if I found the right rims and fenders I'd go ahead to start the project.

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3422b4fb75.jpg

markk900 12-25-20 08:40 AM

oldspokes I laced up an AW and a nice alloy front up to 700C rims and have used them on a couple of bikes I wanted to try as 3-speeds built from frames like yours. Currently they are on a Trek 600 that I did up first with drop bars but have since gone to more upright bars. Not english or I would post a picture here!

oldspokes 12-25-20 02:12 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 21847887)
oldspokes I laced up an AW and a nice alloy front up to 700C rims and have used them on a couple of bikes I wanted to try as 3-speeds built from frames like yours. Currently they are on a Trek 600 that I did up first with drop bars but have since gone to more upright bars. Not English or I would post a picture here!

A number of years ago I built up a Lotus Classique wth Champion #1 tubing with a pair of Araya A20 rims with a roller brake front hub and Nexus 7 rear hub. I used alloy riser bars and a taller stem with a Selle Royale padded leather saddle. The bike was light, nimble, fast and very comfortable to ride but the frame had a ton of flex being used in the upright position. So much so that I gave up on it and put the bike back to stock and sold it. It was an early Nexus 7 speed hub with a trigger type shifter, the shifter was near impossible to keep in adjustment and the roller brake didn't work well with a big rider. I laced the Nexus hub into a 26" wheel and set up a beach cruiser with it and sold it.

I have some concern that I'll get the same issues with the 25.5" Super Course frame but I was hoping that the straight gauge main triangle only 531 tubing would make for a lot stiffer frame. Another issue would be choosing the right crankset to give me proper gearing to match the AW hub.

I also considered that maybe I'd be better off with a plain steel frame both due to my size and the fact that a lesser frame will likely allow a wider tire.

2fat2fly 12-26-20 02:10 AM

My size is something that's kept me away from the higher end frames over the years. As a teen I broke a few chromoly frames, all were 63-64mm size. I did better with a slightly smaller frame in plain steel. I switched to buying mostly 23-24" frames, or 59-60mm. They were stiffer and the smaller size made them a bit lighter, often not much more than the higher end frame in the larger size. Then again, weight was never an issue when your 6ft 3in tall and over 300 lbs. The only Raleigh I broke was a 1978 Professional on which the right chain stay snapped off at the bottom bracket after two seasons of riding. They stood behind it though. I also didn't run the sew-up tires it came with, I swapped in a pair of Weinmann concave rims and a pair of 700x25 tires, something that the dealer did for me before I bought it.
Even then though I had a three speed for going places, a few were English, a few were Schwinn, one was two were German or Austrian, and one older Columbia. I still own both of the Schwinn's but they've been hanging in the attic now for 30 years.
I want something English, I want a three speed, and I prefer it to be black in a 23" frame.

The thought of converting a road bike sounds expensive to me, while it would be lighter and a better long distance ride, I prefer to just find something that's factory. The Sprite 27 was a thought but it will simply cost too much in the end vs. just paying a bit more for a clean bike to start with. I don't need a big project. I don't mind doing a tear down, clean, and re-lube, but the thought of needing to put $100 into something on top of whatever it cost is not the right answer.

One thing that comes to mind if converting a road bike like a Super Course is what to do for a single speed crankset as well as a chain guard and fenders. It seems counter productive to just use steel fenders, and the difference in bottom bracket widths may make using a cottered Raleigh Sports crankset tough to do. Most road chain rings are 52 tooth, that combined with a common 18t rear on an AW will make it hard to pedal and deprive it of the intended low range.

At least on a Sprite, the BB shell is the same width and a common Sports front crankset can be used, along with the Sports hockey stick chain guard. The rear sprocket though should still be swapped for a larger one due to the larger diameter of the 27" wheels but I'm not sure by how much. The largest sprocket I've ever seen on an AW hub is 22t, and I don't think that was an original cog.
I'm also not sure how much larger a 27x1 3/8" tire is over the original 1 1/4" tire either. Looking at pics, on bikes with fenders, it looks like the diameter increase can be substantial with some tires.

I really like that Hercules listed above, the one listed on Philly CL but its too small. If that were a 23" frame, I'd have likely already made it mine. Its pretty sharp looking in the ad pics. The rest are run of the mill bikes at best judging by their pics.

IsleRide 12-26-20 12:50 PM

Even though I'm working on two derailleur bikes right now I accept the challenge to try and finally do something with this. A friend gave it to me 20 years ago and I'll never sell it but this is the condition I got it in with the finish sanded off. The chrome is good. There are no dents. I have a really nice AW hub with the longer axle. Just need some HMW494 axle washers. Can't see a high end paint restoration (where is Cycle Art when you need them?) but I'm also not sure powder coat will look right on this. For now maybe the idea would be all black with gold high-lighting and build a Pashley-like path racer. Definitely will be three speed though.

BTW standard threaded bottom bracket, Raleigh 26tpi fork.




https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...16e38d2f24.jpg

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...334a3ad0d9.jpg

markk900 12-26-20 12:52 PM

IsleRide Wow - what a beauty. Can you post some more pictures?

dirtman 12-26-20 10:02 PM

Can anyone tell me what an old 531 road frame like that would be worth?
I'll ask here because I don't think that most over in the What's it worth area have the same appreciation for English bikes.

I've often thought that a simple three speed conversion on an old Super Course or similar would be the ideal all around ride.
There's a guy down the road from me with a 23" frame Dawes Galaxy and a bare Raleigh 531 frame both mid to late 70's era.
He told me $250 for the whole Dawes, or $100 for the bare Raleigh frame, which looks about like the orange/red one pictured above.
Both are pre-forged dropouts, so there's no derailleur hanger to cut off. The Dawes is well used but rideable with a set of tires.
The big question is whether a frame like that would take wide enough tires to look right with fenders and all the trimmings a Super Tourer would have had. I trash picked a Nexus 8 speed that's currently in a 26" cruiser wheel but its way wider than an AW, and I absolutely could not picture using a cheap plastic twist grip shifter like was on that cruiser.

I'm leaning toward the Raleigh but somehow feel I'd be better off with a 27" wheel frame. I really like the idea of a Sprite 3 speed if it can be done up to look truly British and not just like another Schwinn Suburban copy.

barnfind 12-27-20 01:10 PM

I owned a Dawes Galaxy back in the day, it was one of my favorite bikes over the years.
I'm not sure I'd take one and turn it into a three speed if it were a complete working bike as is.
Price wise, I'd think that any decent frame set has got to be worth $100, I've gotten that much for
old Schwinn Varsity frame sets. At one point I had over 200 frame sets from one clean out, not many sold
for less than $100.
23" and 25" are also the two most popular sizes so that alone will ad some value. Its the small sizes that sit listed
for months. Finding one local, and not having to pay for shipping to get it is worth something too.
From what I've seen the Nexus hubs are pretty decent but I agree, the shifters all seem to be less than ideal.
The few I've had over the years all seemed overly complicated and hard to keep adjusted.
A plain old Sturmey Archer AW felt so much better to me.

Salubrious 12-28-20 04:32 PM


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 21849860)
Can anyone tell me what an old 531 road frame like that would be worth?
I'll ask here because I don't think that most over in the What's it worth area have the same appreciation for English bikes.

I'm leaning toward the Raleigh but somehow feel I'd be better off with a 27" wheel frame. I really like the idea of a Sprite 3 speed if it can be done up to look truly British and not just like another Schwinn Suburban copy.

I think most of the 3-speeded bikes I've seen have been Super Courses. Its Brit, accepts 27" and the AW hub, and most of all isn't that hard to find or expensive. $100-$300 depending on condition and your luck.

2fat2fly 12-29-20 03:13 AM

As neat as the idea of a three speed road bike sounds, I don't think it would fit my needs as well as a stock Sports type bike.
Many of the places I ride have lengths of dirt trails, some are hard packed dirt, some sort of look like fine mulch over sand.
A road bike doesn't go through that well. What I really need is a Sports type bike with the widest tire made.
I thought about converting a mountain bike but don't like the feel of that type of bike. ( I might consider an earlier mountain bike as they tended to have more relaxed angles than the bikes that came after around the mid 80's or so.). The relaxed angles of the Sports or any of the clones fits me better. I don't ride nearly as much as I used to, or likely should but I do so both to get some exercise and to get around the immediate area. Fenders are a must, a low enough gear to pull a few minor hills, the ability to mount a basket and rear rack, and tires wider than most. I did buy a set of Michelin World Tour tires off CL for another bike, I like how they look, they're nearly as wide as most middle weight tires mounted on Schwinn S5 rims, so I'd expect about the same look on a Raleigh with Westrick rims.
The wider tires also handle my size and weight better. They seem less likely to pinch flat over curbs and potholes.

bluesteak 12-29-20 10:11 AM

Hercules
 
Thanks for the good words about the Hercules. Unfortunately good words donít prevent me from being a bike hoarder, placate my concerned loved ones, or provide funds to use on new projects aka the mongrel Lenton.

What is the solution to offloading excess bikes? Is it worthwhile to become a premium member so I can advertise on the site? It seems like that would be like preaching to the choir.

gster 12-29-20 12:35 PM

Truth in Advertising
Another example of a bike flipper.
Listed @ $240.00
Raleigh built Rodeo bicycle.
Built for the Canadian hardware chain Beaver Lumber
Listed as a "fixie" with a coaster brake....
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...cc1857b30a.jpg

gster 12-29-20 12:38 PM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21853263)
Thanks for the good words about the Hercules. Unfortunately good words donít prevent me from being a bike hoarder, placate my concerned loved ones, or provide funds to use on new projects aka the mongrel Lenton.

What is the solution to offloading excess bikes? Is it worthwhile to become a premium member so I can advertise on the site? It seems like that would be like preaching to the choir.

Earlier this summer I decided to cut back
20+ bicycles were too many.
I had set myself a limit of 10 a few years back.
I advertised locally and sold 5 of them.
There was a real bike shortage last summer and they moved quickly.
No profit but it freed up some space.

bluesteak 12-29-20 04:44 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21853573)
Earlier this summer I decided to cut back
20+ bicycles were too many.
I had set myself a limit of 10 a few years back.
I advertised locally and sold 5 of them.
There was a real bike shortage last summer and they moved quickly.
No profit but it freed up some space.

So I am reading that always have at least one bike advertised locally, and donít be too aggressive on price.

gster 12-29-20 04:48 PM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21853962)
So I am reading that always have at least one bike advertised locally, and donít be too aggressive on price.

i would think so.
Most people don't want to pay for shipping and I don't want to spend time breaking a bike down to ship..

dirtman 12-30-20 06:45 AM

Most of the buyers I've run into on CL over the past few years likely couldn't even fix a flat tire let alone put a bike together out of a box.
What happened to the days when every kid knew how to fix a flat tire on his bike by the time they were eight years old?
I've actually had neighbors come to me wanting me to replace their tires because they were flat. When you ask if they tried putting air in it they just look at your funny.

Bikes have been a tough sell around here all year, it seems junk sells and decent bikes just sit. They go crazy for Walmart bikes but older or classic bikes never get a reply. When they do, its from someone far away who's willing to make the drive. The last bike I sold went to a guy who drove 350 miles each way. It had been listed for over four years.

Salubrious 12-30-20 11:09 AM


Originally Posted by 2fat2fly (Post 21852964)
As neat as the idea of a three speed road bike sounds, I don't think it would fit my needs as well as a stock Sports type bike.
Many of the places I ride have lengths of dirt trails, some are hard packed dirt, some sort of look like fine mulch over sand.
A road bike doesn't go through that well. What I really need is a Sports type bike with the widest tire made.
I thought about converting a mountain bike but don't like the feel of that type of bike. ( I might consider an earlier mountain bike as they tended to have more relaxed angles than the bikes that came after around the mid 80's or so.). The relaxed angles of the Sports or any of the clones fits me better. I don't ride nearly as much as I used to, or likely should but I do so both to get some exercise and to get around the immediate area. Fenders are a must, a low enough gear to pull a few minor hills, the ability to mount a basket and rear rack, and tires wider than most. I did buy a set of Michelin World Tour tires off CL for another bike, I like how they look, they're nearly as wide as most middle weight tires mounted on Schwinn S5 rims, so I'd expect about the same look on a Raleigh with Westrick rims.
The wider tires also handle my size and weight better. They seem less likely to pinch flat over curbs and potholes.

For something like this I would consider going one of three ways: 1) get a Sport and use the 650A tire size which is a pretty good compromise for pavement and gravel, although it favors pavement. 2) get a rod brake frame and build wheels for it using modern SA hubs with drum brakes front and rear. The rod brake frames are nice and long and really work pretty well on trails and it doesn't hurt that you have better rollover with the increased diameter and tire width. 3) get a frame that allows for 650b rims and tires. The 650b tire size is meant to do well on gravel, trails and pavement since that was/is what's around if you do a randonneur.

markk900 12-30-20 11:34 AM


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 21854670)
Bikes have been a tough sell around here all year, it seems junk sells and decent bikes just sit. They go crazy for Walmart bikes but older or classic bikes never get a reply. When they do, its from someone far away who's willing to make the drive. The last bike I sold went to a guy who drove 350 miles each way. It had been listed for over four years.

Dragging this thought back to 3-speeds, I will say that to me its all about familiarity.....I am now over 60, but even when I was a kid 3-speeds in general and "english 3-speeds" were becoming a rarity: I was an enthusiast in my area (itself a huge rarity) and no one in the enthusiast space would bat an eye at a 3-speed, decent or not. Fast forward to today and you have potentially 2 or 3 generations of riders that have never seen anything except department store bikes (none of which are 3 speeds); the audience looking to buy from the local online ads are either enthusiasts who will drive 12 hours for the right bike, and the general public who don't know crap about decent bikes and are looking at names they know and price. We are actually quite lucky in the sense it keeps a pretty decent supply going for our hobby.

There's another thread here in C&V about a $300 mountain bike challenge....its an interesting thread but in one of the attached videos they illustrated a search for their target bikes (under $300) - i was shocked at how many bikes in one sequence were listed in that person's locality of decent quality mountain bikes for under $75..... sure they might be junk but the quality bikes were abundant; one of the participants ended up with a wally-world hybrid that was (as he put it) museum quality (he knew it was crap!).

dweenk 12-30-20 01:16 PM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 21855098)
Dragging this thought back to 3-speeds, I will say that to me its all about familiarity.....I am now over 60, but even when I was a kid 3-speeds in general and "english 3-speeds" were becoming a rarity: I was an enthusiast in my area (itself a huge rarity) and no one in the enthusiast space would bat an eye at a 3-speed, decent or not. Fast forward to today and you have potentially 2 or 3 generations of riders that have never seen anything except department store bikes (none of which are 3 speeds); the audience looking to buy from the local online ads are either enthusiasts who will drive 12 hours for the right bike, and the general public who don't know crap about decent bikes and are looking at names they know and price. We are actually quite lucky in the sense it keeps a pretty decent supply going for our hobby.

There's another thread here in C&V about a $300 mountain bike challenge....its an interesting thread but in one of the attached videos they illustrated a search for their target bikes (under $300) - i was shocked at how many bikes in one sequence were listed in that person's locality of decent quality mountain bikes for under $75..... sure they might be junk but the quality bikes were abundant; one of the participants ended up with a wally-world hybrid that was (as he put it) museum quality (he knew it was crap!).

I saw that thread. Initially I thought that the premis was to find or build a bike for as little under $300 as possible. Now I see people stripping frames, welding/brazing, and repainting. I don't get it.

gster 12-30-20 01:37 PM


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 21854670)
Most of the buyers I've run into on CL over the past few years likely couldn't even fix a flat tire let alone put a bike together out of a box.
What happened to the days when every kid knew how to fix a flat tire on his bike by the time they were eight years old?
I've actually had neighbors come to me wanting me to replace their tires because they were flat. When you ask if they tried putting air in it they just look at your funny.

Bikes have been a tough sell around here all year, it seems junk sells and decent bikes just sit. They go crazy for Walmart bikes but older or classic bikes never get a reply. When they do, its from someone far away who's willing to make the drive. The last bike I sold went to a guy who drove 350 miles each way. It had been listed for over four years.

Sadly its a different world and changing very quickly (for some of us)
There are few 35 year olds who know how to work with their hands (other than computer/video games)
A large % don't have a driver's licence.
I still have a flip phone..
No apps, no GPS, no funny cat videos, selfies or photos of my lunch.
I packed up my stuff and came down to Mexico last month and will stay here
until things at home return to something tolerable.

IsleRide 12-30-20 08:08 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21855333)
Sadly its a different world and changing very quickly (for some of us)
There are few 35 year olds who know how to work with their hands (other than computer/video games)
A large % don't have a driver's licence.
I still have a flip phone..
No apps, no GPS, no funny cat videos, selfies or photos of my lunch.
I packed up my stuff and came down to Mexico last month and will stay here
until things at home return to something tolerable.

Which bike did you bring with you?

dirtman 12-31-20 12:51 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21855333)
Sadly its a different world and changing very quickly (for some of us)
There are few 35 year olds who know how to work with their hands (other than computer/video games)
A large % don't have a driver's licence.
I still have a flip phone..
No apps, no GPS, no funny cat videos, selfies or photos of my lunch.
I packed up my stuff and came down to Mexico last month and will stay here
until things at home return to something tolerable.

Its sort of the same here, but I find guys as old as 50 who don't have a clue.
I really don't understand the not wanting to get a driver's license thing though?
I see that here more and more. I'm in a neighborhood that's been slowly changing as the older folks die off. There's couples in the early 20's with multiple kids and no license, a huge mortgage, and no clue how to do anything themselves.
I really don't get the not wanting to learn to drive, when I was 15 I was building my first car, I got it up and running in a few months and was sneaking out with it pretty often. I couldn't wait to get my license so I didn't have to worry about getting caught.
I had my license three days before I headed to FL for a week with a bunch of buddies in my van. These days these kids can't fathom driving around the block let alone 1500 miles away. This isn't an area where you can do without a car either. Nothing is close, its 5 miles to just about anything you need. One young couple rely on uber or neighbors, and the neighbors are getting tired of giving them rides. Now there's 5 more just like them.
I asked the one guy why he never got a license and he said he didn't want to contribute to the destruction of this planet. Yet he's got no issue asking me for a ride in my F350 diesel when he needs something from the store. The bad part is that most don't even own a bike, they walk, call Uber, or bum a ride.

I also only have a flip phone, I never saw the need for anything else. Its a phone and that's all I want it to be.
I also don't get texting, to me its like going back to those little pagers they used to sell. It takes the same amount of time to dial a call as it does to send a text, with less typing. My phone is capable but I block all texts. I feel if someone needs to get hold of me they can just call me.

I haven't been to Mexico in 35+ years when a bunch of us spend a drunken weekend or two in Tijuana in the middle of a trip to San Diego.

adventurepdx 12-31-20 01:14 AM


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 21856084)
I really don't get the not wanting to learn to drive, when I was 15 I was building my first car, I got it up and running in a few months and was sneaking out with it pretty often. I couldn't wait to get my license so I didn't have to worry about getting caught.

Well, why would young folks get a car? Most cars are way too expensive these days and require folks to go into debt in order to drive. And most modern cars are too complicated for most folks to work on them themselves.

I owned cars for five years of my life in my late teens into early twenties. Most were crappy $500 cars that had things that broke monthly. One time I decided to "step up" and get a "quality" used car from a dealer. I ended up paying $200/month in payments, $150/month in insurance, and add on gas. And I was making $800/month take home. I needed a car to get to my job so I can pay for my car. That got old fast.

I decided to skip buying another car and moved to a city like Portland where I didn't need to drive on a daily basis, a place where I could walk, take transit, or bike. Yes, I still keep my license current. The past couple years I've had access to my girlfriend's van, but I try to limit using that as much as possible.

I'm pretty happy to see a new generation that's not that excited to drive. And hopefully more of them will get on bikes.

adventurepdx 12-31-20 01:18 AM


Originally Posted by dirtman (Post 21856084)
I also only have a flip phone, I never saw the need for anything else. Its a phone and that's all I want it to be.
I also don't get texting, to me its like going back to those little pagers they used to sell. It takes the same amount of time to dial a call as it does to send a text, with less typing. My phone is capable but I block all texts. I feel if someone needs to get hold of me they can just call me.

I hate talking on the phone. Hate. Didn't like it much before cell phones and the like, either, and yes, I am old enough to grow up using a rotary dial phone.
Texting gets to the point. No pleasantries and beating around the bush. Plus, if someone texts me important info (like their address) I have it stored on the phone. I don't have to worry about remembering it or look for something to write on.

dirtman 12-31-20 01:20 AM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 21855098)
Dragging this thought back to 3-speeds, I will say that to me its all about familiarity.....I am now over 60, but even when I was a kid 3-speeds in general and "english 3-speeds" were becoming a rarity: I was an enthusiast in my area (itself a huge rarity) and no one in the enthusiast space would bat an eye at a 3-speed, decent or not. Fast forward to today and you have potentially 2 or 3 generations of riders that have never seen anything except department store bikes (none of which are 3 speeds); the audience looking to buy from the local online ads are either enthusiasts who will drive 12 hours for the right bike, and the general public who don't know crap about decent bikes and are looking at names they know and price. We are actually quite lucky in the sense it keeps a pretty decent supply going for our hobby.

There's another thread here in C&V about a $300 mountain bike challenge....its an interesting thread but in one of the attached videos they illustrated a search for their target bikes (under $300) - i was shocked at how many bikes in one sequence were listed in that person's locality of decent quality mountain bikes for under $75..... sure they might be junk but the quality bikes were abundant; one of the participants ended up with a wally-world hybrid that was (as he put it) museum quality (he knew it was crap!).

I find that they not only 'recognize' only the cheap bikes, they search for them.
I've had buyers tell me they don't want any old junk, they're looking for something new that's cheaper than Walmart.
It don't help either that many of the younger crowd don't even ride bikes anymore.
As a kid, I don't think there was anyone I knew that couldn't ride or didn't own a bike of some type. Most had brand new Schwinn or Columbia 10 speeds from one of two local shops, the rest had department store Huffy bikes, but at least they knew how to ride.
Many of us rode our bikes to school, so having one was a necessity. Now you don't see kids on bikes, they get their parents to chauffeur them around by car or they walk. I had a pair of older BMX bikes that came from a garage clean out I did, they were lower end models but both were in nice shape. I offered them to the neighbor who had two boys, 8 and 10 years old. I was told "Absolutely not", "we're not going to deal with all the problems that come with kids on bikes". That was a dozen or so years ago, the kids never learned to ride, they played video games. One is in his 20's and don't drive, never got his license, the other is also old enough but has no intention to drive a car either. They still play video games all day.
When I was in my teens, there were dozens of kids out and about all day long, we all had bikes, we all used them to go places. I used to ride 30 miles each way a few times a month to go visit my grandparents. I used my bike to deliver newspapers for almost 10 years as a kid, I delivered 250 newspapers every day of the week on a bike, up to the point I got a motorcycle and I used a 350cc BSA for the last few months before getting a real job and moving to another state just after high school.
Now that's unheard of. Kids don't have paper routes, kids don't have bikes, and kids don't go outside, they just sit around and play games on their high dollar smart phones.
Although I wish I wasn't passing the 60 year mark myself sometimes, I'm kind of glad I'm not growing up in today's society. I couldn't imagine not being able to ride a bike, fix my truck, or fix things around the house. As I get older, I and choose to do less myself I find it hard to find someone who is capable of doing repairs correctly. Its gotten to the point those doing the work were trained by those who didn't really ever learned how themselves. They all just seem to skate by these days not really knowing what they're doing. I found out the hard way that there's no longer a bike shop around that stocks spokes, or parts of any kind, and not a one that knows how to build or true a wheel. They all rely on a guy who travels shop to shop fixing wheels. In my opinion, its just sad that its come to this these days.


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