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WhyFi 05-25-22 03:12 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22519844)
Yes, it downloads from Strava and as far as I can tell the VO2max estimate has nothing to do with HRV.

Ah, okay. Interesting to learn that that level of HR data is collected by Garmin/Wahoo/Whatever and that Strava maintains that integrity.

Are you a Garmin user? I wonder how the VO2Max estimates compare.

datlas 05-25-22 03:22 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22519837)
Interesting gizmo, but not as interesting as a lactate meter. However, that's a deep hole off the cave of pointless geekiness I'm already in and I don't like finger sticks.

Agree.

What I have noticed is that an easy paced ride (say Z2-3) causes my sugar to go down into a good zone (about 100-ish) and stay there, while a harder ride (Z3-4 with occasional anaerobic bursts) causes my sugar to spike to 150-ish (because adrenaline) for an hour or so, and then it gradually works its way down to 100-ish. I did a 90 mile really hard ride and did not have any low sugar concerns, although I ate reasonably well for it.

Maybe I am too skeptical, but I believe these units are GREAT for folks with diabetes (especially with T1DM and when the sensor is integrated with an insulin pump) to track what actions raise and don't raise their sugars, but for an athlete I don't see much use.

MoAlpha 05-25-22 03:23 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22519850)
Ah, okay. Interesting to learn that that level of HR data is collected by Garmin/Wahoo/Whatever and that Strava maintains that integrity.

Are you a Garmin user? I wonder how the VO2Max estimates compare.

I am, but my Garmin watch doesn't provide fitness measures.

The simplest estimation technique is HRmax/HRrest x 15.3. That gives me a VO2max of 53.

MoAlpha 05-25-22 03:43 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22519864)
Agree.

What I have noticed is that an easy paced ride (say Z2-3) causes my sugar to go down into a good zone (about 100-ish) and stay there, while a harder ride (Z3-4 with occasional anaerobic bursts) causes my sugar to spike to 150-ish (because adrenaline) for an hour or so, and then it gradually works its way down to 100-ish. I did a 90 mile really hard ride and did not have any low sugar concerns, although I ate reasonably well for it.

Maybe I am too skeptical, but I believe these units are GREAT for folks with diabetes (especially with T1DM and when the sensor is integrated with an insulin pump) to track what actions raise and don't raise their sugars, but for an athlete I don't see much use.

So, ignorant question here: Given the ability of brain, skeletal, and cardiac muscle to metabolize lactate and ketones, which are abundant during prolonged exercise, would a somewhat low glucose even be a concern?

Also, are you finding it effective at other times to blunt the highs? My brother has mild T2DM, which he's controlling with diet and exercise, and maybe should have one.

datlas 05-25-22 03:48 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22519885)
So, ignorant question here: Given the ability of brain, skeletal, and cardiac muscle to metabolize lactate and ketones, which are abundant during prolonged exercise, would a somewhat low glucose even be a concern?

Also, are you finding it effective at other times to blunt the highs? My brother has mild T2DM, which he's controlling with diet and exercise, and maybe should have one.

I suspect that our homeostatic mechanisms keep sugar reasonably well controlled, but I also suspect that after several hours of hard work and inadequate calorie intake, when one is bonking or on the verge of it, sugar may dip. That is my best guess about what this might actually be useful for.

I have IFG (pre-diabetes) and I notice that if I have a naughty snack between meals (like that donut I had last Tuesday), my sugar really spikes (up to about 180) for an hour. So I think it could be very helpful as a feedback device to discourage such naughtiness, in a person who is motivated. Again, most useful for T1DM for insulin dosing etc. That's my sense.

MoAlpha 05-25-22 03:59 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22519893)
I suspect that our homeostatic mechanisms keep sugar reasonably well controlled, but I also suspect that after several hours of hard work and inadequate calorie intake, when one is bonking or on the verge of it, sugar may dip. That is my best guess about what this might actually be useful for.

I have IFG (pre-diabetes) and I notice that if I have a naughty snack between meals (like that donut I had last Tuesday), my sugar really spikes (up to about 180) for an hour. So I think it could be very helpful as a feedback device to discourage such naughtiness, in a person who is motivated. Again, most useful for T1DM for insulin dosing etc. That's my sense.

Yeah, obviously a huge thing in IDDM

Bah Humbug 05-25-22 04:05 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22519845)
My sympathies - I love onion and garlic. Are we talking indigestion or similar ailments? It seems odd that it would affect both of you.

FODMAPs. So... well you can infer. There's lots we can do - salt and pepper and all sorts of heat. But prefab seasoning is out.

gnome 05-25-22 04:18 PM


Originally Posted by Bah Humbug (Post 22519833)
Sadly, onion and garlic now do bad things to my stomach (and AG's) and that wipes out essentially all pre-made sauces and spice mixes. Fortunately, Buc'ees sells good huge salads and you can buy chicken and cheese to put on top. Better food than you can get at any other place for a restricted diet. Of course, they also have more interesting fare for those who can partake.

My condolences. I know the feeling. Onions, unless extremely thoroughly cooked, don't agree with my stomach anymore. I can still eat garlic though.

MoAlpha 05-25-22 05:00 PM

I have the FODMAP thing too, but to whatever degree I have it, it’s worth eating the stuff except in the most extreme cases.

WhyFi 05-25-22 05:07 PM

In the last couple of years, I switched to oat milk, from cow milk, in my morning lattes. In doing so, I discovered that the, uh, coffee effect was actually a dairy effect. While this has been a welcome discovery, I must admit that it makes my morning weigh-in a little less streamlined.

big john 05-25-22 05:25 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22519826)
Spice is the variety of life.

I worked with a guy who brought home made salsa every day and he always had enough to share. He experimented with different chilis and other ingredients and he was really good at it. He was not a mechanic but he got his car taken care of.

genejockey 05-25-22 05:32 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22519960)
In the last couple of years, I switched to oat milk, from cow milk, in my morning lattes. In doing so, I discovered that the, uh, coffee effect was actually a dairy effect. While this has been a welcome discovery, I must admit that it makes my morning weigh-in a little less streamlined.

See, now, I avoid this by never putting milk in coffee, which should be...

Black as Night,
Hot as Hell,
Strong as Love,
and
Pure as an angel's kiss.

At least, so my Dad used to say.

Bah Humbug 05-25-22 05:48 PM


Originally Posted by WhyFi (Post 22519960)
In the last couple of years, I switched to oat milk, from cow milk, in my morning lattes. In doing so, I discovered that the, uh, coffee effect was actually a dairy effect. While this has been a welcome discovery, I must admit that it makes my morning weigh-in a little less streamlined.

Weird - strong black coffee has "the effect" for me. Dairy is fine, but I come from literally centuries, at minimum, of actual dairy farmers.

Bah Humbug 05-25-22 05:49 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22519952)
I have the FODMAP thing too, but to whatever degree I have it, itís worth eating the stuff except in the most extreme cases.

The problem is for us it's not just bathroom issues - it's immediate bloating and cramping.

WhyFi 05-25-22 05:59 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22519985)
See, now, I avoid this by never putting milk in coffee, which should be...

Black as Night,
Hot as Hell,
Strong as Love,
and
Pure as an angel's kiss.

At least, so my Dad used to say.

Did your dad drink espresso?

datlas 05-25-22 06:00 PM

I preach the low FODMAP diet to my IBS patients, but fortunately I can eat pretty much anything I want.

WhyFi 05-25-22 06:07 PM


Originally Posted by Bah Humbug (Post 22519996)
Weird - strong black coffee has "the effect" for me. Dairy is fine, but I come from literally centuries, at minimum, of actual dairy farmers.

Dairy that's a little more processed, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, etc, might make me feel a little bloated when consumed in sufficient (relatively high) quantity, but only straight-up milk will result in the effect. Then again, the only time that I drink (drank) milk was with the morning latte, so maybe it was just a daily perfect storm - a circadian readiness paired with a dairy pat on the back.

WhyFi 05-25-22 06:09 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22519979)
I worked with a guy who brought home made salsa every day and he always had enough to share. He experimented with different chilis and other ingredients and he was really good at it. He was not a mechanic but he got his car taken care of.

I was going to say, "I wish that I had friends like that," but I know brewers, so I'll just be happy to count my blessings.

Trsnrtr 05-25-22 06:17 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22519952)
I have the FODMAP thing too, but to whatever degree I have it, it’s worth eating the stuff except in the most extreme cases.

I’ve been following FODMAP since 2019 and have a pretty good handle on what I can eat and what I can’t and onions and garlic are definitely a no-go for me. Breaded foods like chicken strips or tenderloins are bad, too, and dense breads like pizza crust, pita, bagels, etc. are problematic, too.

Like my gastro guy told me, “You can eat anything you want as long as you can stand the consequences.”

MoAlpha 05-25-22 06:37 PM


Originally Posted by Bah Humbug (Post 22519997)
The problem is for us it's not just bathroom issues - it's immediate bloating and cramping.

That’s exactly what I get! I call it “blokey” the way the patients did at the old Boston City.

Velo Vol 05-25-22 06:37 PM


Originally Posted by DougRNS (Post 22519388)
You people are argumentative. What happened to the kinder, gentler Addiction?:foo:

Remember when you used to post about ironing your laundry?

MoAlpha 05-25-22 06:38 PM

Hey WhyFi , Intervals will now estimate your VO2max and mine agrees with HRV4training.

DougRNS 05-25-22 07:01 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22520053)
Remember when you used to post about ironing your laundry?

no, but curiously I just finished ironing tomorrow's pants and shirt.

On a side note, I go to the cardiologist tomorrow for my anticoagulant monitoring. I hope to get an at home finger stick test kit. I'm going to look like a smack junkie if they keep tapping my veins every week. SM*H

At least I have my weather app with its superior accuracy to bring some sunshine into my otherwise s****y life.

#SmallVictories

WhyFi 05-25-22 07:20 PM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 22520054)
Hey WhyFi , Intervals will now estimate your VO2max and mine agrees with HRV4training.

I poked around and found it. Oof - harsh. :cry: I guess that I haven't been pushing it lately.

indyfabz 05-25-22 07:20 PM


Originally Posted by DougRNS (Post 22520080)

On a side note, I go to the cardiologist tomorrow for my anticoagulant monitoring. I hope to get an at home finger stick test kit. I'm going to look like a smack junkie if they keep tapping my veins every week. SM*H

My last two INRs were an excellent 2.6. Iím supposed to be between 2 and 3.


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