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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Dewey101 07-11-17 10:24 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 19710972)
In my motorcycle experience, 40 nm is very tight so I would cheat towards the SA spec. As long as you've got the safety strap attached of course.

Thanks @clubman, I think I should start with the higher Thule recommended torque setting, absolutely I will use the safety strap as well, and see how it goes on a test ride with a 30lb weight in the trailer before towing anybody.

Dewey101 07-12-17 05:03 PM

I cannot get the Thule hitch adapter for Shimano IGH extension nut to fit on the Sturmey axle despite being threaded to 3/8" 26tpi so it does not work. I don't want to replace the axle and the spare axle nut arrived from Harris so I will just carry that in case.

BigChief 07-12-17 07:44 PM


Originally Posted by Dewey101 (Post 19714422)
I cannot get the Thule hitch adapter for Shimano IGH extension nut to fit on the Sturmey axle despite being threaded to 3/8" 26tpi so it does not work. I don't want to replace the axle and the spare axle nut arrived from Harris so I will just carry that in case.

Why not replace the 5 3/4" axle with a 6 1/4"? I think that would be the easiest way, although you would also have to find the longer indicator HSA 126 to go with it.

thumpism 07-14-17 05:42 AM

Sorry to interrupt the axle discussion. Here's a nice looking 23" on the local CL. I also checked CL for a dozen cities on a recent driving trip to Illinois and back and I found several nice ones that I may post here.

https://richmond.craigslist.org/bik/6210568234.html

1973 Raleigh Sports 3-Speed Men's Bicycle - $120 (Museum District)

https://images.craigslist.org/00m0m_...K2_600x450.jpg

condition: good
make / manufacturer: Raleigh
model name / number: Sports

1973 Raleigh Sports Bicycle with 3-Speed Sturmey Archer hub and Brooks brown leather saddle. The frame size is approximately 56-57cm and the standover height is 32 inches.

This bike is in great shape and everything works as it should. There are minor dings and scratches (it is a 40+ year old bicycle). See photos. It would make a great around-town bike. I've used it as a commuter and have been very happy with it. I'm selling it because I own two bikes right now and need to make some space in my shed.

Velocivixen 07-14-17 07:10 AM

@arty dave - regarding your comment about the crown race just sitting there, not snug. Just about every Raleigh- whether a Twenty, or a Sport had the same crown race situation. @gugie showed me a n old shop trick where he took a small "punch" and made tiny divots around the steer tube right where the crown race would sit. The divots displaced the steel enough to make tiny raised areas, so when the crown race was slid back into place, it held tighter.
Honestly, though, I just reassemble and things work fine. I wonder if they were designed that way?

scale 07-14-17 07:22 AM


Originally Posted by Velocivixen (Post 19700945)
I wonder if anyone knows a few details about what appears to be a 1971 Raleigh Twenty. It's all original. I'm the second owner. Front hub has an oil hole with a band. I've never seen this on a Twenty.
The pedal reflectors, which are built in, are white & not amber/yellow. I did not ask the seller where his grandparents bought them, but they have (406) 20" wheels - for the American market.

I have a 1972 R20 with the hole and band in the front hub and the 406s. I believe the pedal reflectors are amber. Ill check when i get a chance.

BigChief 07-14-17 08:00 AM

Finished the '73 roadster today. I can say with certainty now, since I've tried both, that the Kool Stop salmon inserts are, hands down, more aggressive stoppers than the Fibrax pads. Besides the usual setup steps of getting the pads to land on the correct place on the rim and evenly, I had to bend the levers down a bit to get maximum leverage. I've found that you need a distance of about 3" from the lever ends to the grip. These were a good 1/2" short. I mounted the front pads trailing the stirrup this time and can't say I notice any difference between this and my other roadster with leading mounted pads. I had no trouble at all with this 73 AW hub. I replaced all the bearings and gave it some new marine grease. Shifts smoothly. I did remove the plastic BB bearing cages and used loose balls instead. This is more of a hunch that science. Just seems to me that 22 bearings would be better than 14. I didn't replace the broken shifter and cable pulley with period correct parts. What can I say? I just don't like them. I used late 50s SA parts. Now that's it's geared down and has brakes that work, I really enjoy riding this bike. That's thanks to all the people here at BF that gave me so much valuable info.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4319/...aff3960f_b.jpg73DL1a by Billy Bones, on Flickr

nlerner 07-14-17 08:08 AM

^ Very nice, @BigChief!

browngw 07-14-17 09:09 AM

1972 Supercycle "Made in England" 3speed
 
5 Attachment(s)
Another project bike purchased at the Canadian Vintage Bicycle Show. It's owner convinced me I should have it, and when he lowered his price to $50, I took the bait. AW hub stamped 72, original white wall "Coaster" tires (stamped Foreign?) some sort of leather saddle that says Birmingham and can make out a W (Wrights?) There is was enough oil on the rear rim to save it but the front is toast. Picked up one at the show $5 that is presentable. Stem is loose, haven't tried seatpost yet.
Supercycle bikes have a special meaning to me and others as we often rode them as kids.

DQRider 07-14-17 09:30 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19718242)
Finished the '73 roadster today. I can say with certainty now, since I've tried both, that the Kool Stop salmon inserts are, hands down, more aggressive stoppers than the Fibrax pads. Besides the usual setup steps of getting the pads to land on the correct place on the rim and evenly, I had to bend the levers down a bit to get maximum leverage. I've found that you need a distance of about 3" from the lever ends to the grip. These were a good 1/2" short. I mounted the front pads trailing the stirrup this time and can't say I notice any difference between this and my other roadster with leading mounted pads. I had no trouble at all with this 73 AW hub. I replaced all the bearings and gave it some new marine grease. Shifts smoothly. I did remove the plastic BB bearing cages and used loose balls instead. This is more of a hunch that science. Just seems to me that 22 bearings would be better than 14. I didn't replace the broken shifter and cable pulley with period correct parts. What can I say? I just don't like them. I used late 50s SA parts. Now that's it's geared down and has brakes that work, I really enjoy riding this bike. That's thanks to all the people here at BF that gave me so much valuable info.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4319/...aff3960f_b.jpg73DL1a by Billy Bones, on Flickr

She's a beauty, BigChief! :thumb: I'm with you about the older `50s components over the later stuff. I try to eliminate as much plastic as I can on my bikes - and those steel pulleys look and function so much better. :50:

In other news, I've taken temporary possession of a pair of Triumph 3-speeds, sold to me by our very own @gna. These will get a thorough detailing and tune-up before going to their new owners - a guy I work with and his wife. My goal is to get them to ride the Lake Pepin Tour in two years' time. Pics to follow...



eatontkd 07-14-17 10:31 AM


Originally Posted by DQRider (Post 19718497)

In other news, I've taken temporary possession of a pair of Triumph 3-speeds, sold to me by our very own @gna. These will get a thorough detailing and tune-up before going to their new owners -

... You could build one for me DQ... just saying'....

gna 07-14-17 10:59 AM


Originally Posted by DQRider (Post 19718497)

In other news, I've taken temporary possession of a pair of Triumph 3-speeds, sold to me by our very own @gna. These will get a thorough detailing and tune-up before going to their new owners - a guy I work with and his wife. My goal is to get them to ride the Lake Pepin Tour in two years' time. Pics to follow...

Both of those bikes appeared in this thread years ago. They were gone, then returned. I hope they get ridden in their new home.

EDIT: http://www.bikeforums.net/10957686-post448.html

SirMike1983 07-14-17 09:25 PM

Raleigh Sprite 5-speed - warm evenings this week.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1yzg72X54...709_171844.jpg

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WRMklHo9-...713_193708.jpg

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BnOCAjDAk...713_193647.jpg

arty dave 07-15-17 03:55 AM

Velocivixen - Funny you should comment on the crown race - I was recently reading (around page 350ish as I work my way through) about your 1st sports, its loose crown race, the advice you got, and the fix :) So thanks for your reply, it's good to know it's pretty much a non-issue, as I was kinda getting ready to be all worried about it. I think I'll just do what you did and put a couple of spots of epoxy in there, only enough that I can remove it again if I want to. It's weird cause it's not loose enough to shim, really it's just 'there', not loose, not snug. A 'Goldilocks' fit :)

Bigchief the DL is looking great!

Browngw, nice looking bike!

SirMike, you have a jealousy inducing collection!

SirMike1983 07-15-17 09:00 PM

1958 Raleigh Sports 4-speed for a ride today after fixing a flat.

https://bikeshedva.blogspot.com/2017...-carousel.html

I really like the FW hubs.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2qaqONZis...715_165715.jpghttps://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2qaqONJNZ...715_165715.jpg

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nGtG34vIh...715_165731.jpg

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-snIZJwkln...715_140758.jpg

thumpism 07-16-17 05:07 AM

Tall ones coming out of the woodwork this week, this one a ladies' frame.

https://richmond.craigslist.org/bik/...220938885.html

Raleigh Women's 3-speed (ca.1971) - $95 (Midlothian/Richmond)

https://images.craigslist.org/00m0m_...kR_600x450.jpg

condition: good
make / manufacturer: Raleigh

This is a lovely vintage Raleigh Women's 26" three speed, manufactured in Nottingham, England. The rear three speed hub is not original but was replaced about five years ago. The seat, as seen in the picture, does have a tear, but I'm happy to include a seat cover with purchase. Otherwise, the bike is in very good condition.

Thanks very much for looking!

gster 07-16-17 05:25 AM

There are some very nice bikes out there...
This being one of them.

BigChief 07-16-17 07:11 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19722162)
There are some very nice bikes out there...
This being one of them.

Yes, beautiful photos too. Always enjoying seeing Sir Mikes pictures. Been thinking about finding some chrome pump clamps for the downtube of my Sprite. Can't imagine why Raleigh left off the pump lugs on this model.

gster 07-16-17 11:23 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19722279)
Yes, beautiful photos too. Always enjoying seeing Sir Mikes pictures. Been thinking about finding some chrome pump clamps for the downtube of my Sprite. Can't imagine why Raleigh left off the pump lugs on this model.


When Tube Investments took over Raleigh in 1960 they were determined to cut costs and raise profits. A savings of 50 cents per unit x a million units adds up quickly. The elimination of the heron's eye on the chain ring being a prime example. Loose bearings vs. caged and so on....

BigChief 07-16-17 04:41 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19722683)
When Tube Investments took over Raleigh in 1960 they were determined to cut costs and raise profits. A savings of 50 cents per unit x a million units adds up quickly. The elimination of the heron's eye on the chain ring being a prime example. Loose bearings vs. caged and so on....

True. My cracked piston award goes to Sturmey Archer when, by 1973, they decided to eliminate the little steel nut on the cable pulley band and make the band a bit longer, fold it over on itself and tap a hole in the thin, soft band material for the cheap, barely plated screw. The older ones were a classy bit of manufacturing. Sturdy two piece clip together band, deep headed machine screw, semi domed flatted nut and steel wheel all with a gun barrel blue or zinc finish. The 60s plastic wheeled units may not have been as nice, but at least they worked. Yup...I've got a right to rant. I had one slide down the seat tube and scratch the paint and wreck the 20 30 sticker.

gster 07-16-17 06:43 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19723246)
True. My cracked piston award goes to Sturmey Archer when, by 1973, they decided to eliminate the little steel nut on the cable pulley band and make the band a bit longer, fold it over on itself and tap a hole in the thin, soft band material for the cheap, barely plated screw. The older ones were a classy bit of manufacturing. Sturdy two piece clip together band, deep headed machine screw, semi domed flatted nut and steel wheel all with a gun barrel blue or zinc finish. The 60s plastic wheeled units may not have been as nice, but at least they worked. Yup...I've got a right to rant. I had one slide down the seat tube and scratch the paint and wreck the 20 30 sticker.

We all need a good rant every once in a while.

SirMike1983 07-16-17 06:50 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19723246)
True. My cracked piston award goes to Sturmey Archer when, by 1973, they decided to eliminate the little steel nut on the cable pulley band and make the band a bit longer, fold it over on itself and tap a hole in the thin, soft band material for the cheap, barely plated screw. The older ones were a classy bit of manufacturing. Sturdy two piece clip together band, deep headed machine screw, semi domed flatted nut and steel wheel all with a gun barrel blue or zinc finish. The 60s plastic wheeled units may not have been as nice, but at least they worked. Yup...I've got a right to rant. I had one slide down the seat tube and scratch the paint and wreck the 20 30 sticker.

The clear plastic-faced shifters: the plastic-faced shifters that used the clear plastic don't necessarily look bad, but they rely on tension of the screw to hold them tight. The problem is the same screw exerts pressure on the plastic faceplate and inevitably cracks it once you have it tight enough to hold the shifter in place. Then once the crack appears, it loosens the screw just a bit and the shifter isn't tight enough again. When the plastic was new, maybe it worked OK, at best. 40+ years later, the design is self-defeating.

gster 07-16-17 07:01 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19723477)
The clear plastic-faced shifters: the plastic-faced shifters that used the clear plastic don't necessarily look bad, but they rely on tension of the screw to hold them tight. The problem is the same screw exerts pressure on the plastic faceplate and inevitably cracks it once you have it tight enough to hold the shifter in place. Then once the crack appears, it loosens the screw just a bit and the shifter isn't tight enough again. When the plastic was new, maybe it worked OK, at best. 40+ years later, the design is self-defeating.

I like and collect the all metal ones with the the etched face.
George at Parkdale Bicycles, gave me a nice one today.

BigChief 07-16-17 07:45 PM

Yes...the trigger shifters too. On my roadster, all that was left of the trigger shifter cover was a tiny bit of plastic under the screw head. Another bad idea IMO. I also don't like the key hole ferrule connector on the later shifters. The cable tends to move around more than the earlier shifters with the threaded ferrule joint. Those face plates were embossed brass, chrome plated then printed. Very nice work by skilled craftsmen. No CNC machines back then. Those dies were made by hand. The work that went into those shifter face plates is something you would never see today's products. I've been hoarding bike parts for a long time. I just had the SA box out to finish the roadster. I'll post a picture of them before I put them away.

SirMike1983 07-16-17 08:00 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 19723505)
I like and collect the all metal ones with the the etched face.
George at Parkdale Bicycles, gave me a nice one today.

The 1950s-era window ones are my favorites - every time I see one for cheap, I buy it.

BigChief 07-16-17 10:15 PM

3 Attachment(s)
I was a flee market junkie back in the 70s. Always scanning for old English bikes and parts. Most of the shifters I have came at one time in a treasure chest of SA stuff somebody else collected. I'm not finding much in the way of 50s parts these days. My wife did come home with this a couple years ago. Here's a before and after of the 3 or 4 speed shifter that I got from it. It's on my roadster now.

Attachment 572291

Attachment 572292

Attachment 572293

gster 07-17-17 02:41 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 19723868)
I was a flee market junkie back in the 70s. Always scanning for old English bikes and parts. Most of the shifters I have came at one time in a treasure chest of SA stuff somebody else collected. I'm not finding much in the way of 50s parts these days. My wife did come home with this a couple years ago. Here's a before and after of the 3 or 4 speed shifter that I got from it. It's on my roadster now.

Attachment 572291

Attachment 572292

Attachment 572293

Those are my favourite as well.

markk900 07-17-17 05:07 AM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 19718430)
Another project bike purchased at the Canadian Vintage Bicycle Show. It's owner convinced me I should have it, and when he lowered his price to $50, I took the bait. AW hub stamped 72, original white wall "Coaster" tires (stamped Foreign?) some sort of leather saddle that says Birmingham and can make out a W (Wrights?) There is was enough oil on the rear rim to save it but the front is toast. Picked up one at the show $5 that is presentable. Stem is loose, haven't tried seatpost yet.
Supercycle bikes have a special meaning to me and others as we often rode them as kids.

Lovely score @browngw .... nice match to the Robin Hood.

The very first drop bar bike I ever saw was a friend's Supercycle just like yours, so I also have good memories of that brand and that colour in particular. He was also the first kid I knew who grew long(ish) hair - not at the back mind you, just his bangs - his parents would not allow the back to grow out (circa 1967/8).

BigChief 07-17-17 06:14 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by gster (Post 19724022)
Those are my favourite as well.

Here's an ad from December 1949. This was an improvement over the older design. An internal spring that didn't get lost when you changed the cable. The new small end style cable with threaded ferrule and the new more modern SA logo. How sharp.
Attachment 572321

nlerner 07-17-17 06:24 AM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 19723645)
The 1950s-era window ones are my favorites - every time I see one for cheap, I buy it.

I've managed to accumulate a bunch of those, but on most the spring seems kind of shot, and I don't think it has enough tension to hold the gear. Anyone have a fix for that?


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