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-   -   Addiction 2022.2 (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1249389)

genejockey 04-12-22 01:53 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22470192)
My dad has a watch that looks very much like that, but is electric and makes a high pitched hum. I think it's also about 60 years old. Should I ask him about it?

Sounds like a Bulova Accutron, one of the first battery operated watches, and the first to use a tuning fork for timing.

datlas 04-12-22 01:56 PM

lplo

datlas 04-12-22 01:57 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22470209)
Sounds like a Bulova Accutron, one of the first battery operated watches, and the first to use a tuning fork for timing.

Google says that looks about right. It also says the value for such a watch is modest. Oh well, so much for early retirement on Dad's watch.

Mojo31 04-12-22 02:25 PM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22470197)
So how many nasty, dangerous Android apps were identified this week? :innocent:

There are lots of dangerous iPhone apps as well. The key with any device is to be smart about what you do. :innocent:

But, the answer to your question is "none on my phone."

Mojo31 04-12-22 02:25 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22470215)
Google says that looks about right. It also says the value for such a watch is modest. Oh well, so much for early retirement on Dad's watch.

I came to the same realization when my dad gave me his 60+ year old watch.

datlas 04-12-22 02:41 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22470242)
I came to the same realization when my dad gave me his 60+ year old watch.

My dad also has a fairly extensive U.S. stamp collection from when he was a kid. TONS of interesting postage stamps, mainly from the 1930's and 1940's. I figured they must be highly valuable.

Not so. Sigh.

genejockey 04-12-22 02:42 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22470215)
Google says that looks about right. It also says the value for such a watch is modest. Oh well, so much for early retirement on Dad's watch.

The value of most vintage American watches is pretty modest. Accutrons have the added issue that most watchmakers won't touch them, and there aren't parts available. AND they're completely different from mechanincal watches. Most mechanical watches are basically the same plan laid out in about 1850, so a competent watchmaker can fix any of them. Once you get past the Hamilton Electric, battery-powered watches are totally different.

genejockey 04-12-22 02:44 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22470242)
I came to the same realization when my dad gave me his 60+ year old watch.

The Smiths have been decidedly middle class for the last two centuries. None of the watches I inherited - including two from the late 18th Century - are either rare or valuable.

Mojo31 04-12-22 02:54 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22470252)
My dad also has a fairly extensive U.S. stamp collection from when he was a kid. TONS of interesting postage stamps, mainly from the 1930's and 1940's. I figured they must be highly valuable.

Not so. Sigh.

I have such a collection as well.

I share your depression.

Bah Humbug 04-12-22 03:29 PM

I have heirloom silver and... that's about it. Apparently it'd be worth a couple of grand if sold, but I like it. It's nicer than the stamped stainless stuff from Target.

Oddly, AG is allergic and can't use it; she gets deep painful cracks in her hands when she does.

LAJ 04-12-22 03:38 PM

I still have my Lumia 928 that ran Windows. It was a sad day when I had to go Apple, simply because Android sucks eggs. Apple is far closer to Windows than that goofy-assed Android tomfoolery.

Bah Humbug 04-12-22 03:44 PM

I want this one... the minty-green one. And with the home theater and wet bar. Nice tidy 4200sqft for the two of us.

https://photos.zillowstatic.com/fp/9...1536_1152.webp

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3...3920303_zpid/?

Bah Humbug 04-12-22 03:48 PM


Originally Posted by LAJ (Post 22470307)
I still have my Lumia 928 that ran Windows. It was a sad day when I had to go Apple, simply because Android sucks eggs. Apple is far closer to Windows than that goofy-assed Android tomfoolery.

From your lips to God's ears, as they say. I tried Android once; never again. Mom has one and supporting it makes me itch more than usual. At least iOS is getting closer to the WP7 experience, just a few years late. Funny how many of us there are on here for how unpopular it was.

LAJ 04-12-22 03:50 PM


Originally Posted by Bah Humbug (Post 22470317)
I want this one... the minty-green one. And with the home theater and wet bar. Nice tidy 4200sqft for the two of us.

https://photos.zillowstatic.com/fp/9...1536_1152.webp

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3...3920303_zpid/?

Excellent. I was within a few miles of knowing where that would was, based on the terrain.

genejockey 04-12-22 03:55 PM


Originally Posted by Bah Humbug (Post 22470299)
I have heirloom silver and... that's about it. Apparently it'd be worth a couple of grand if sold, but I like it. It's nicer than the stamped stainless stuff from Target.

Oddly, AG is allergic and can't use it; she gets deep painful cracks in her hands when she does.

Mrs. GeneJockey ended up inheriting both her Mother's and her Grandmother's sterling and stainless. Both of them had the same pattern of stainless, so now we have at least a dozen place settings worth. AND her grandmother also got extra teaspoons, so no matter how long it is between dishwashings, we never run out of spoons.

When the Pandemic began and I was looking around for a project, I cataloged both sets of sterling, bought a few replacements, and polished all of it. I even bought a nice silver chest for her Grandmother's stuff. We haven't used it since.

Mojo31 04-12-22 04:04 PM

My wife is into dishes like I'm into watches and cars. We have china, silver and crystal for 12 that gets used every few years that we got when we married. She has three sets of "everyday" dishes and two sets of stainless, both to serve 12. She has 10 - 15 sets of placemats. And, a set of Christmas dishes.

There are a few really nice bikes in all of that.

I don't get it, but can't really say much.

genejockey 04-12-22 04:26 PM


Originally Posted by Mojo31 (Post 22470344)
My wife is into dishes like I'm into watches and cars. We have china, silver and crystal for 12 that gets used every few years that we got when we married. She has three sets of "everyday" dishes and two sets of stainless, both to serve 12. She has 10 - 15 sets of placemats. And, a set of Christmas dishes.

There are a few really nice bikes in all of that.

I don't get it, but can't really say much.

Between Mrs. GeneJockey and myself, we have inherited at least 4 sets of dishes, none of which we wanted. One set was something that Mom and Dad got back in the 1950s, heavy beige stoneware with mushrooms drawn in them in very 1950s style. We sold the whole set at a garage sale for $10. Mrs. GJ made the mistake of accepting a check, which turned out to be rubber and I think we ended up paying a $25 fee for some reason. Mrs. GJ and I agreed it was worth it to be rid of them. Then there was her mother's Pfaltzgraf, which we used for a few years and also got rid of. And somehow she inherited dishes from both her Grandmothers. She was unable to stop her cousin shipping one set to us, so now they're sitting in two boxes somewhere. Fortunately, she was able to stop a different cousin shipping her other grandmother's set to us. I guess we could put them all in the china cabinet that I inherited from my Great Aunt, which we also don't want and which sits at what used to be my parent's house but now belongs to my oldest sister, which is currently chock full of all kinds of dishes and stuff.

I've concluded that the middle class of the 20th Century acquired a lot of stuff that meant something to them at the time, probably that they were upwardly mobile and could afford some frippery like fancy dishes you'd never use in a decorative cabinet you had to dust, but now that we, their children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren are inheriting it, mostly we don't have any space or interest.

BillyD 04-12-22 04:49 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22470148)
Nope. 60 year old Elgin Automatic, built in the US of A.
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...feb36de4a9.jpg
It tells the time. That's it.

I can talk to people on mine. Sooo . . . . .

bampilot06 04-12-22 04:49 PM

Garmin has been saying my training is unproductive ever since I started riding again. I am offended.

rjones28 04-12-22 04:51 PM


Originally Posted by Velo Vol (Post 22469977)

That is not here.

genejockey 04-12-22 04:51 PM


Originally Posted by BillyD (Post 22470372)
I can talk to people on mine. Sooo . . . . .


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22470374)
Garmin has been saying my training is unproductive ever since I started riding again. I am offended.

This is the advantage of a mechanical watch. They don't pass judgement.

bampilot06 04-12-22 04:52 PM


Originally Posted by rjones28 (Post 22470378)
That is not here.

or here.

Bah Humbug 04-12-22 04:56 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22470360)
Between Mrs. GeneJockey and myself, we have inherited at least 4 sets of dishes, none of which we wanted. One set was something that Mom and Dad got back in the 1950s, heavy beige stoneware with mushrooms drawn in them in very 1950s style. We sold the whole set at a garage sale for $10. Mrs. GJ made the mistake of accepting a check, which turned out to be rubber and I think we ended up paying a $25 fee for some reason. Mrs. GJ and I agreed it was worth it to be rid of them. Then there was her mother's Pfaltzgraf, which we used for a few years and also got rid of. And somehow she inherited dishes from both her Grandmothers. She was unable to stop her cousin shipping one set to us, so now they're sitting in two boxes somewhere. Fortunately, she was able to stop a different cousin shipping her other grandmother's set to us. I guess we could put them all in the china cabinet that I inherited from my Great Aunt, which we also don't want and which sits at what used to be my parent's house but now belongs to my oldest sister, which is currently chock full of all kinds of dishes and stuff.

I've concluded that the middle class of the 20th Century acquired a lot of stuff that meant something to them at the time, probably that they were upwardly mobile and could afford some frippery like fancy dishes you'd never use in a decorative cabinet you had to dust, but now that we, their children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren are inheriting it, mostly we don't have any space or interest.

It's exactly that. And in many cases, the china cabinet and contents are prized by the grandparents and they find it very important that the grandkids want it and take it to their small apartment....

I understand those Hummels that I hadn't heard of until Better Call Saul are the same situation.

Bah Humbug 04-12-22 04:59 PM


Originally Posted by bampilot06 (Post 22470374)
Garmin has been saying my training is unproductive ever since I started riding again. I am offended.

Garmin's opinion on such things needs work. It tends to poorly account for things such as temperature and starting up from scratch, or near-scratch. And yes, they might say "but it's unproductive anyway because your fitness isn't increasing from the effort", but you can't get to those increasing workouts without getting through the ones it doesn't like, in many cases. At least in my experience.

Bah Humbug 04-12-22 05:01 PM

And I just burned my hand taking the dinner frittata out of the oven, so there's that too.


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