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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

Chr0m0ly 02-01-19 05:11 PM

I'm interested in finding something like these bikes, for utility use, foul weather, errands, pub ride, etc. But from what I can tell they are mostly hi-tension steel, and not butted?
Are there any three (or four or five speeds) with higher end frames? Butted Mangy-molly would be fine, I know these are utility cycles, but something a touch lighter would've nice!

Barring that, I'm conciderering IGH-ifying a nicer frame, and If I go that route what sort of geometry would work best? I have an '84 Trek 520 I think would work well in this role, I would think a mid-level touring frame would be a good choice, am I wrong? Are there better choices?

Thanks!

BigChief 02-01-19 06:29 PM


Originally Posted by Chr0m0ly (Post 20775100)
I'm interested in finding something like these bikes, for utility use, foul weather, errands, pub ride, etc. But from what I can tell they are mostly hi-tension steel, and not butted?
Are there any three (or four or five speeds) with higher end frames? Butted Mangy-molly would be fine, I know these are utility cycles, but something a touch lighter would've nice!

Barring that, I'm conciderering IGH-ifying a nicer frame, and If I go that route what sort of geometry would work best? I have an '84 Trek 520 I think would work well in this role, I would think a mid-level touring frame would be a good choice, am I wrong? Are there better choices?

Thanks!

There have been some really nice IGH roadsters built from higher end frames posted here on this thread. I've been thinking of a roadster based on a Super Course frame for a while now. Might get to it someday.

clubman 02-01-19 06:32 PM

You can convert most frames, keeping in mind that vintage Sturmey hubs are usually made for 110 OLD and commonly 40 holes (36 can be found.) A 120 OLD is totally doable. Newer IGH's are available to fit modern frames with a range of lacing options.
@nlerner had a lovely PX10 out and about not long ago.

gster 02-02-19 07:18 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20774742)
I have a 1965 catalogue/price list from the Merchants Trading Limited, who appears to have owned Canadian distribution rights. The early to mid 60's were a strange time when they 'Canadianized' most of the 3 speeds models as Laurentians, Mounties, Canadians, Space Riders, Colts and Explorers and offered a different range of colours and equipment. You couldn't buy a Sports but you could buy a Superbe...in black, red or blue. I'll scan it when I find it.

By the 70's, everything had reverted to typical Raleigh models, names, colours and equipment but I can't find any documentation.

It would be nice to see some of those pages if you have the time to scan.
I have a blue (with white trim) 1960/61 Superbe that I assume is a Canadian model.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1d9c544c21.jpg

nlerner 02-02-19 07:23 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20775194)
You can convert most frames, keeping in mind that vintage Sturmey hubs are usually made for 110 OLD and commonly 40 holes (36 can be found.) A 120 OLD is totally doable. Newer IGH's are available to fit modern frames with a range of lacing options.
@nlerner had a lovely PX10 out and about not long ago.

See https://www.bikeforums.net/20755686-post19081.html.

markk900 02-02-19 08:39 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20775194)
You can convert most frames, keeping in mind that vintage Sturmey hubs are usually made for 110 OLD and commonly 40 holes (36 can be found.) A 120 OLD is totally doable. Newer IGH's are available to fit modern frames with a range of lacing options.
@nlerner had a lovely PX10 out and about not long ago.

I built up a set of 700C wheels with a 36H AW, and they are currently mounted in my 1983 Trek 600 - always wanted to try a nice 531 frame with a 3-speed. Was an easy installation and I also built a 700C wheel with a 6-speed freewheel so I can swap around - takes about an hour to go from one to the other.

paulb_in_bkln 02-02-19 10:11 AM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20775764)
I built up a set of 700C wheels with a 36H AW, and they are currently mounted in my 1983 Trek 600 - always wanted to try a nice 531 frame with a 3-speed. Was an easy installation and I also built a 700C wheel with a 6-speed freewheel so I can swap around - takes about an hour to go from one to the other.

Good on you! I have the same Trek in red with the silver trim (also converted to 700c before a U-Ro-Peen bike tour long ago) which because there's some damage to the main tubes isn't worth any $$ but it still rides well. I positively relate to what you've done because what a nice lively feel with that DB 531 (main tubes only, not fork or stays). I believe it's an exaggeration to say, as some do, that it's just the choice of tires that creates a bike's feel. Sometimes, for the sake of nostalgia, I think of having the frame repaired and AW'd but with a repaint and replica decals to the original standard it just seems too expensive for what was a good but not outstanding bike at the time. Although I don't think enough good things can be said about the aesthetics of that lugged frame. Maybe someday.

clubman 02-02-19 01:14 PM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20775892)
I believe it's an exaggeration to say, as some do, that it's just the choice of tires that creates a bike's feel.

Agreed but I think it's still true that upgrading tires gives you the greatest improvement in ride quality with the least expense.

Mind you todays high end tires are getting ridiculously expensive.

paulb_in_bkln 02-03-19 08:25 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20776110)
Agreed but I think it's still true that upgrading tires gives you the greatest improvement in ride quality with the least expense.

Mind you todays high end tires are getting ridiculously expensive.

Col de la Vie? No experience yet myself but seem like they might have a lively feel without demanding crazy $$. The commuters with multi-layer belts etc for puncture resistance like the Schwalbe Marathon line get expensive. The Rudge I've been riding a lot lately came with some light Kendas similar to original equipment and yet so far no flats, which is startling considering the state of NYC streets and also that on other bikes I've had horrible luck with Kendas. I've been getting away with something.

One thought for my old Trek; maybe have it repaired (top and downtube need replacement) and painted satin black, no decals. OK so it doesn't shout "I'm a vintage Trek!" but it takes the bike to like-new functional condition without OTT spending, maybe.

gster 02-03-19 08:52 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20776954)
Col de la Vie? No experience yet myself but seem like they might have a lively feel without demanding crazy $$. The commuters with multi-layer belts etc for puncture resistance like the Schwalbe Marathon line get expensive. The Rudge I've been riding a lot lately came with some light Kendas similar to original equipment and yet so far no flats, which is startling considering the state of NYC streets and also that on other bikes I've had horrible luck with Kendas. I've been getting away with something.

One thought for my old Trek; maybe have it repaired (top and downtube need replacement) and painted satin black, no decals. OK so it doesn't shout "I'm a vintage Trek!" but it takes the bike to like-new functional condition without OTT spending, maybe.

I've using these tires on my bikes and I quite like them.
Good price @ $18.00/tire
Nice tread pattern
Good ride
No flats (yet)
All black w/small logo
The REAL problem these days is inner tubes that slowly (sometimes quickly) leak air.
I've got original Dunlop tubes from the 50's that are tighter than the new ones.
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...894753446b.jpg

paulb_in_bkln 02-03-19 08:59 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20776978)
I've using these tires on my bikes and I quite like them.
Good price @ $18.00/tire
Nice tread pattern
Good ride
No flats (yet)
All black w/small logo
The REAL problem these days is inner tubes that slowly (sometimes quickly) leak air.
I've got original Dunlop tubes from the 50's that are tighter than the new ones.

$18! That is good. Maybe the older inner tubes use thicker rubber?

gster 02-03-19 09:00 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20776991)
$18! That is good. Maybe the older inner tubes use thicker rubber?

Probably REAL rubber.

gster 02-03-19 09:04 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20776993)
Probably REAL rubber.

Like these Raleigh grips that seem to last forever and maintain their softness.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2cde6070b7.jpg

markk900 02-03-19 09:43 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20776954)
Col de la Vie? No experience yet myself but seem like they might have a lively feel without demanding crazy $$. The commuters with multi-layer belts etc for puncture resistance like the Schwalbe Marathon line get expensive. The Rudge I've been riding a lot lately came with some light Kendas similar to original equipment and yet so far no flats, which is startling considering the state of NYC streets and also that on other bikes I've had horrible luck with Kendas. I've been getting away with something.

One thought for my old Trek; maybe have it repaired (top and downtube need replacement) and painted satin black, no decals. OK so it doesn't shout "I'm a vintage Trek!" but it takes the bike to like-new functional condition without OTT spending, maybe.

The Col de la Vie tires are by no means cheap (at least in Canada), and are slightly larger section than most of the original tires for these bikes. I have a set on the Humber and they ride very nicely but I don't find them "fast".

OT: how bad is the damage on the Trek? Unless unsafe why not throw a sticker over the dent and go ahead and build an IGH?

paulb_in_bkln 02-03-19 10:31 AM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20777044)
OT: how bad is the damage on the Trek? Unless unsafe why not throw a sticker over the dent and go ahead and build an IGH?

The bike is safe but the damage is conspicuous and not cover-up-able. I have thought of what you said, but the Trek has been useful to me as a derailleur bike. Plus, ahead of it project-wise is the cotterless cranking and AW-ing a salvaged mid-70s Peugeot mixte that while the finish is awful is straight and undinged. I finally got back my built 700c wheels (CR18s) after a long wait (two years almost!) and unfortunately some harsh words. I have not been able to locate a cotterless spindle that fits the old French BB, so will probably wind up shelling out for the Velo Orange BB, once I figure out the spindle length I need. I am so much better at making plans than at carrying them out.

PeterLYoung 02-03-19 03:53 PM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 20747176)
I have now stripped this bicycle to last nut & bolt (except wheels). I checked the Philips Catalogue in Veteran Cycle Club's Library for 1957 and established the bike is a P2 Ladies Sports Light Roadster (The Mens version was a P1) On inspection I have found there is a problem with the SW 3 Speed which is missing the 'telltale' and needs to be dismantled to clean and inspect anyway so I will know more once it is apart. I have obtained two further 1957 SW Hubs, one in apparent good condition and one not so but can be raided for spare parts, I also found a NOS Telltale and gear change spindle on eBay which is on its way currently (I was amazed to find this).

I cannot believe how little the bike has suffered considering its age, the paintwork has only minor damage typical on a bike used for a few years only. It must have been stored in a very dry place. for example, the inside on the mudguards had a small amount of dirt which when wiped off revealed the paint full intact, I removed the Chrome Nose from the front mudguard to de rust the inside. Everything dismantled easily and a couple of days soaking in white vinegar has cleaned all the chrome and removed any rust.

The headstock, pedals and bottom bracket bearings were completely dried out with the remains of the grease falling out as dust, fortunately it has not been ridden in this condition as the bearing surfaces are all good and will be re-used with new balls.

The brake cables are beyond redemption however and replacements are unobtainable in my searches so far here in USA but in February I return to the UK and I expect my local bike shop there will be able to find some with correct nipples. I have already found a NOS 3 Speed cable and replacement Sturmey Archer gear changer as the one on the bike has been badly bent & damaged from leaning against a wall as illustrated in recent discussion above.

I have compounded the frame and the paint which was flat and dull has come up well and nows has a shine, I was careful not to damage the transfers so those areas are not a shiny as areas that had none but I am happy with how it looks. I plan to clear lacquer the painted parts which should improve its looks and protect the paint and transfers. I will also inject the frame with 'J. P. Weigles - Bicycle Frame Saver' as the climate here in North Carolina is very humid and it will prevent internal corrosion of the frame.

The wheels I have not touched yet but they only have minor pitting of the chrome rims and hubs are in nice condition. I will deal with them when I come back to USA in May/June


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...c7c84e4d69.jpg
.

An update on progress with the Philips. I completely polished the frame taking care around the transfers then touched up some of the worst blemishes and gave it a couple of coats of clear lacquer. One error I made was to lightly mask the most fragile transfers, big mistake as I lost a small amount when removing the masking tape. Overall the main frame has turned out well and I have injected all tubes with 'frame saver' just in case though I could see very little corrosion in sections I could inspect. When it came to the forks they needed a lot more paint. I managed to mask up the lining and fill in the areas of damage but when I applied the lacquer it did not agree with the paint so I had to strip of all I had applied down to the original enamel but in doing so lost what had remained of the line work. I finished up respraying the forks and they currently await clear coat which I will do when I get back to USA in May/June.

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3052551b6a.jpg

Basic frame after treatment.

BigChief 02-03-19 04:39 PM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 20777537)
An update on progress with the Philips. I completely polished the frame taking care around the transfers then touched up some of the worst blemishes and gave it a couple of coats of clear lacquer. One error I made was to lightly mask the most fragile transfers, big mistake as I lost a small amount when removing the masking tape. Overall the main frame has turned out well and I have injected all tubes with 'frame saver' just in case though I could see very little corrosion in sections I could inspect. When it came to the forks they needed a lot more paint. I managed to mask up the lining and fill in the areas of damage but when I applied the lacquer it did not agree with the paint so I had to strip of all I had applied down to the original enamel but in doing so lost what had remained of the line work. I finished up respraying the forks and they currently await clear coat which I will do when I get back to USA in May/June.

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3052551b6a.jpg

Basic frame after treatment.

Looking good! Now you have a perfectly good reason to buy a fun new tool. This has been on my wish list far too long waiting for a need to come along. I'm almost at the point of buying one anyway. Besides, I need to practice before I can use it on a real project. How's that for inventive rationalization?
https://www.beugler.com/

PeterLYoung 02-03-19 04:55 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20777600)
Looking good! Now you have a perfectly good reason to buy a fun new tool. This has been on my wish list far too long waiting for a need to come along. I'm almost at the point of buying one anyway. Besides, I need to practice before I can use it on a real project. How's that for inventive rationalization?
https://www.beugler.com/

Had a look at the website, very interesting and very tempting, yes I am a tool freak, need no encouragement. My wife just rolls her eyes!!!! The guy makes it look so easy, I am sure it is a learned skill needing plenty of practice especially on a tapering & curved tube such as a bike fork. Something to think about though, might go for it!!!. If you get one be sure to post how you get on.

markk900 02-04-19 06:03 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20777098)
The bike is safe but the damage is conspicuous and not cover-up-able. I have thought of what you said, but the Trek has been useful to me as a derailleur bike. Plus, ahead of it project-wise is the cotterless cranking and AW-ing a salvaged mid-70s Peugeot mixte that while the finish is awful is straight and undinged. I finally got back my built 700c wheels (CR18s) after a long wait (two years almost!) and unfortunately some harsh words. I have not been able to locate a cotterless spindle that fits the old French BB, so will probably wind up shelling out for the Velo Orange BB, once I figure out the spindle length I need. I am so much better at making plans than at carrying them out.

Still semi on topic - I also have an early 70s Peugeot - which I owned since 1973 and back then converted to cotterless. You can continue to use the cups that are on the bike and I think the spindle is a "SSS" or "3S" (not sure if that's size). Anyway, it was not hard to source a spindle at the LBS - take the cottered one with you and find a cotterless spindle with same basic specs. As to OT - the IGH on 700C wheels was on this bike before the Trek.

Salubrious 02-04-19 11:32 AM


Originally Posted by Chr0m0ly (Post 20775100)
I'm interested in finding something like these bikes, for utility use, foul weather, errands, pub ride, etc. But from what I can tell they are mostly hi-tension steel, and not butted?
Are there any three (or four or five speeds) with higher end frames? Butted Mangy-molly would be fine, I know these are utility cycles, but something a touch lighter would've nice!

Barring that, I'm conciderering IGH-ifying a nicer frame, and If I go that route what sort of geometry would work best? I have an '84 Trek 520 I think would work well in this role, I would think a mid-level touring frame would be a good choice, am I wrong? Are there better choices?

Thanks!

One thing about that makes these bikes so charming is the ride. That does not come from any one thing; wheel size, tires, frame geometry and materials all play a role. I've played with a lot of high end frames and its a bit of a trick to find one that has the same charm- most are too harsh. If you are planning 700c I would not do anything less than 28mm (33 would be better and likely faster too) and I would run wider rims; both will help with ride quality. The thing about the 650A tire size that most British 3-speeds use is its extremely well adapted to a variety of surfaces (as anyone on the Lake Pepin 3-speed tour can tell you)- not too slow on pavement and relatively sure-footed on gravel (its arguable that the rod-brake machines were the first mountain bikes...). The frame geometries are relaxed where most 531DB frames tend to be designed to be faster handling (although IME three speed geometries handle plenty fast); in their efforts to make lighter frames handle faster, most of what is happened is ride quality suffered unless the frame builder really knew what he was doing.

So while you can make a more high end bike look the part quite often what occurs is a bike that lacks the ride quality- and as a result tends to spend more time in the garage. One frame that might do the trick is the Schwinn Sports Tourer or Super Sport; both have a more relaxed geometry and have a celebrated ride quality, but those frames aren't exactly lightweight :) They also rode on 27"x 1 1/4" tires.

I have a number of high end bikes, even a custom built frame made of Reynold 953 stainless, but the bike I ride most often is my stupid 1972 Raleigh Superbe- it goes to work, the grocery store, the bank and so on. It has fenders, lights so a ride home at night is no worries, a rack which with a single pannier made it really handy and a locking fork so I usually don't carry a bike lock. I ride it more than any other bike simply because its a great commuter. But I've taken it on the Lake Pepin 3-speed tour and other rides and its totally been up for it. Its not a light bike bit its really ride-able and if the apocalypse came that would probably be my goto.

browngw 02-04-19 02:02 PM

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6405959ea0.jpg
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6e2416c11c.jpg
A fellow bike guy called this morning to see if I was still interested in a bike he has had for 22years or so. It is a Belgium Royal Nord President believed to be circa 1967. I looked at a couple of years ago and took a couple of poor phone shots. At that time he didn't want to part with it, but now has changed his mind. We will have to get to a lower price but I think I want the bike. The green/marble paintjob and the chainguard are fascinating . Now to the English part. Brampton Speedy Switch and hub? Are these similar to the Sturmey Archer?
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...90ecd6407a.jpg

Salubrious 02-04-19 03:11 PM

^^ Yes. Some of the parts are interchangeable.

sd5782 02-04-19 05:10 PM

Tearing into it now
 

Originally Posted by Slowride79 (Post 20768645)
Cotter pin press
New Crank Cotter Press

you will also needpark tool hcw-5 for bb lock ring and hcw-11 for cups. Amazon for those. Fixed cups are a bear but you can leave in or get the bikesmith tool for that too.

As mentioned this is really the first thing along with all other bearings that should be cleaned /replaced /repacked with new wheel bearing grease. 9 times out of 10 they've never been serviced . It will transform the bike from a creaking and clunking contraption to smooth running machine!

Well, thanks to you enablers, I am tearing into the 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman now. Got the cotters out with a modified chain breaker, and even got the crank out. Rust and crud inside. Good call I think on disassembly. I want to start with some grease, and in later years oil down the seat tube. After seeing the axle, it would seem that for oil to get to the bearings, one would be advised to put the bike on its side and work pedals, and then the other side. I think I may get the park tool HCW-11 so as not to have to use a punch and hammer again.

Yes, one pedal was quite stiff so that is apart now. Maybe take the steering head bearings out tomorrow. Can the rear hub bearings be serviced without taking the 3-speed mechanism apart? A bit challenging working on a 50+ year old bike, but a good winter project.

clubman 02-04-19 05:11 PM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 20778973)

Cool 5 pin crank. Is that ring bolt on or riveted? See if you can find a makers mark on it somewhere.

The chainguard is super 60's cool as well.

BigChief 02-04-19 09:59 PM


Originally Posted by sd5782 (Post 20779365)
Well, thanks to you enablers, I am tearing into the 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman now. Got the cotters out with a modified chain breaker, and even got the crank out. Rust and crud inside. Good call I think on disassembly. I want to start with some grease, and in later years oil down the seat tube. After seeing the axle, it would seem that for oil to get to the bearings, one would be advised to put the bike on its side and work pedals, and then the other side. I think I may get the park tool HCW-11 so as not to have to use a punch and hammer again.

Yes, one pedal was quite stiff so that is apart now. Maybe take the steering head bearings out tomorrow. Can the rear hub bearings be serviced without taking the 3-speed mechanism apart? A bit challenging working on a 50+ year old bike, but a good winter project.

Glad the cotters came out well. Being able to reuse them saves time and money. You are right about laying the bike on it's side to get oil into the bearings. You are also right about a proper servicing being much better. I never remove the fixed cup for regular servicing. I just reach in there with a chopstick and rag soaked in paint thinner. Grease will hold the new bearings on the spindle as you thread it through again when reassembling. Yes, if the AW hub is working properly, you can get by with squirting a bit of oil into it. Oil tends to spread around inside nicely. Just don't use anything too heavy. Regular motor oil will do, but servicing it isn't hard to do and can be a fun winter evening project. Beats watching TV. Here's a good video of a rebuild.


sd5782 02-05-19 07:22 AM

Thanks Big chief. On the rear hub, does oil squirted into the hub migrate to the axle bearings? The video doesn't seem to show any greasing of axle bearings. 1964 AW is the hub, and it spins freely and adjustment seems spot on also.. Thanks
Steve

BigChief 02-05-19 10:01 AM


Originally Posted by sd5782 (Post 20780009)
Thanks Big chief. On the rear hub, does oil squirted into the hub migrate to the axle bearings? The video doesn't seem to show any greasing of axle bearings. 1964 AW is the hub, and it spins freely and adjustment seems spot on also.. Thanks
Steve

The oil does seem to migrate everywhere in these hubs and it doesn't take much. Still, it's good to tear down a hub that's been sitting around for 50 years and clean it up. RJ does pack the bearings with marine grease in the video. I use marine grease too. It's claimed it has some sort of additive that fights moisture. I can't say how well it works, but I take them at their word. Moisture is your enemy, hopefully it helps. But, yes, just adding some oil will protect the hub and you could put off a full service without worrying about it. You don't want to run it dry.

Salubrious 02-05-19 11:52 AM


Originally Posted by sd5782 (Post 20779365)
Can the rear hub bearings be serviced without taking the 3-speed mechanism apart? A bit challenging working on a 50+ year old bike, but a good winter project.

The SA AW hub is a very durable design.

If I have one that is stiff and won't shift, I spray WD40 into the oil port for about 5 seconds. Then I spin the wheel a bit with the cranks and try to shift it- some WD-40 will leak out. If weather permits, I take the bike for a spin around the block and see if the gears start shifting. They usually do. Regardless, I put the bike back on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it out with the WD40. Then I let it drain. I then rotate the wheel so the oil port is up, and install about a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid (Dextron). Then I take the bike for another spin- this time for about a mile. At this point it should be working quite nicely (if the bearings are not over-tightened). On return home, I put the bike on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it one more time with the WD40. Then I install the regular oil.

The hub bearing should have a tiny bit of play- they should not be snugged down. If you have the hub set up right, it won't leak a whole lot and the wheel will spin as freely as any good quality hub (like Campagnolo).

sd5782 02-05-19 12:29 PM

Shifts and spins fine now
 

Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 20780437)
The SA AW hub is a very durable design.

If I have one that is stiff and won't shift, I spray WD40 into the oil port for about 5 seconds. Then I spin the wheel a bit with the cranks and try to shift it- some WD-40 will leak out. If weather permits, I take the bike for a spin around the block and see if the gears start shifting. They usually do. Regardless, I put the bike back on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it out with the WD40. Then I let it drain. I then rotate the wheel so the oil port is up, and install about a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid (Dextron). Then I take the bike for another spin- this time for about a mile. At this point it should be working quite nicely (if the bearings are not over-tightened). On return home, I put the bike on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it one more time with the WD40. Then I install the regular oil.

The hub bearing should have a tiny bit of play- they should not be snugged down. If you have the hub set up right, it won't leak a whole lot and the wheel will spin as freely as any good quality hub (like Campagnolo).

It operates just fine now. Bike was purchased last year and I fought shifting a bit until I got rid of the twist grip shifter. I added a liberal amount of oil. Perhaps a dozen rides last year, and it seems fine. Rear hub bearings and shifting seemed fine before winter set in. Perhaps in the warmer future I may tackle the hub. I am just happy now to have done crank bearings. Head bearings, pedals, front wheel, and tires/tubes next. Need brake pads, and the front wheel has a bit of wobble too. Oh what fun.

As an aside, the British seem to like to do things differently.

trainman999 02-05-19 12:55 PM

What is normal OLD on a SA three speed hub?


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