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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

Classtime 09-01-20 12:11 PM

tcpasley GL330s are pretty light. I'm at 160 lb and I wrecked a pair in a couple of pot holes. I still have a pair on one of my regular riders and they have been fun but when they are banged up, I won't be looking to replace them with same. (I write this now but light wheels are a kick and who knows.) If I were you, I'd get a pair of Ambrosio Nemesis which are still available. I have Nemesis on one bike and have ridden them on multiple very rough events and they are like new. Mavic Tubular Open Pros are still around but we don't know what the future of Mavic will be. I don't think Velocity is making the Escapes anymore so replacement rims will be hard to come by and you may as well find a pair of GP4s which I have also ridden on the rough stuff and they are "bullet proof". In sum: Go new and go Ambrosio.

JJScaliger 09-01-20 03:15 PM


Hey tubular lovers! A set of tubed clinchers just won its first TDF stage
Yuck

dimethi 09-02-20 02:41 PM

Crossposting from the Mechanics sub so I'll try to keep from rambling: I was thinking of gluing on a pair of new (but older) Vittoria Pave tires that I haven't used for a few years.

Wanted to ask for opinions on whether they looked safe to ride on; the tread is free of cracks, but some stitching is exposed on the sidewalls--I took a couple pictures of the worst spots.
Any input would be appreciated, thanks!

Picture 1
Picture 2

Classtime 09-02-20 04:14 PM


Originally Posted by dimethi (Post 21674677)
Crossposting from the Mechanics sub so I'll try to keep from rambling: I was thinking of gluing on a pair of new (but older) Vittoria Pave tires that I haven't used for a few years.

Wanted to ask for opinions on whether they looked safe to ride on; the tread is free of cracks, but some stitching is exposed on the sidewalls--I took a couple pictures of the worst spots.
Any input would be appreciated, thanks!

Picture 1
Picture 2

If they also look like that after you have 90 lbs or so in them, then yea, ride them. However, for me, they would conjure some anxiety while doing any high speed turns. I'd probably not use them on spirited group rides because my problem would be everyones problem.

gaucho777 09-02-20 08:37 PM

dimethi My suggestion is to brush on a flexible water-resistant sealant such as Barge Cement which I use on my wide cyclocross tubulars to help protect the sidewalls.

79pmooney 09-02-20 09:35 PM

Open Pros have a synthetic casing. Pretty durable. I haven't used the tubulars but have ridden many of the clinchers until they were old, tired, flat attracters. Small casing issues aren't going to get you in trouble. Watch for a bulge. When you see that, either retire it or boot the casing. (The casing runs on both diagonals. The bulge means what one layer is shot and just the other is working. It will get you home fine.)

Those are good, reliable, dependable tires except - they love to pick up glass and sharp debris. Great n the wet but the wet accentuates the pickup. Down wet mountain roads I've never seen before with unknown pavement they are my first choice. One some roads closer to cities, my last choice.

I'd take 10:1 you never see that bulge riding it until it dies of other causes.

Edit: weeks later - I said Open Pro, Meant Pave as Diable Scott was quick to point out. (Open - clincher. I knew that! Pave; the great green rain tread, I knew that also.)

Ben

DiabloScott 09-03-20 01:39 PM

Them're the REALLY old Pave's.
https://i.imgur.com/XQ9J7xr.jpg

The casing looks fine, the problem is that the protective layer over the casing is gone, so the casing will decompose earlier than expected.
I wouldn't hesitate to ride that tire but I'd keep a close eye on the exposed threads for fraying.

smontanaro 09-03-20 03:22 PM


Originally Posted by dimethi (Post 21674677)
Wanted to ask for opinions on whether they looked safe to ride on; the tread is free of cracks, but some stitching is exposed on the sidewalls--I took a couple pictures of the worst spots.
Any input would be appreciated, thanks!

Picture 1
Picture 2

Kelly's Cork Renew has been recommended to me and seems to work (I have a bottle which I've used on a few tires).

due ruote 09-03-20 03:30 PM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 21676625)
Kelly's Cork Renew has been recommended to me and seems to work (I have a bottle which I've used on a few tires).

Interesting. I wonder what itís made of. The other recommendation I have heard is liquid latex.

WGB 09-06-20 06:23 PM

I removed an older tubular to add more glue. Base cloth strip was torn and came off. So, without considering it should be replaced I tossed the old cloth strip and glued tire directly to the rim. Tire is very tight.
Should I,
- Strip tire back off and glue on a replacement strip?

Ride it???

DiabloScott 09-06-20 06:48 PM


Originally Posted by WGB (Post 21681247)
I removed an older tubular to add more glue. Base cloth strip was torn and came off. So, without considering it should be replaced I tossed the old cloth strip and glued tire directly to the rim. Tire is very tight.
Should I,
- Strip tire back off and glue on a replacement strip?

Ride ir??

The base tape protects the casing and the stitching from sharp bits on the rim like the spoke holes. The tire is probably glued on just fine if you say so, but it'll be at risk of getting damaged and possibly a blow out.

WGB 09-06-20 07:25 PM

Guessing I'll need a new cloth base strip. Assuming I can just get a strip of cotton the width of the tire and cut to fit??

smontanaro 09-07-20 09:00 AM


Originally Posted by WGB (Post 21681356)
Guessing I'll need a new cloth base strip. Assuming I can just get a strip of cotton the width of the tire and cut to fit??

I think you might want to look for bias tape of appropriate width and weight at a fabric store.

Classtime 09-07-20 07:06 PM

I just tossed another Vitoria Rally. A while back, I got a deal on 3 25mm Rally. Bad luck, random chance, whatever--no more Rally tires for me. I was a Sprinter GS/ Competition user and then I spent my birthday $ on a pair of Vittoria Corsa Tubulars and was happy enough that I got some Rally for my vintage ride. Puncture city. On the Corsas and the Rally. I did enjoy the ease of mounting the Vittorias but I just ordered a pair of regular Sprinters and the third Rally that Stans has fixed for now will be my spare.

woodcraft 09-11-20 11:02 AM


Originally Posted by Classtime (Post 21682930)
I just tossed another Vitoria Rally. A while back, I got a deal on 3 25mm Rally. Bad luck, random chance, whatever--no more Rally tires for me. I was a Sprinter GS/ Competition user and then I spent my birthday $ on a pair of Vittoria Corsa Tubulars and was happy enough that I got some Rally for my vintage ride. Puncture city. On the Corsas and the Rally. I did enjoy the ease of mounting the Vittorias but I just ordered a pair of regular Sprinters and the third Rally that Stans has fixed for now will be my spare.


My experience as well- not worth bothering with.

ThermionicScott 09-14-20 03:30 PM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 21653220)
I'm not sure the front/rear differential is enough to cause problems, and most braking isn't of the panic stop variety. Seems to me that the softer "suspension" makes for more comfortable riding, especially over long distances.

Jan Heine is someone I think of as a tire pressure expert. In this post about braking, he said nothing about changing the way he approached tire pressures, so I presume he didn't deviate from his usual recommendations.

I'm a little late to reply on this one, but JH has since clarified/walked-back past support for front tire pressures that were much lower than the rear: https://www.renehersecycles.com/myth...gher-pressure/

It's been about 10 years since I went down the Berto "15% drop" rabbit hole, but pretty early on I decided that 45/55 was about as unbalanced as a road bike ought to be, especially if carrying a front load. Whenever possible, I discourage people from using the 40/60 option that is present on some tire pressure calculators.

And now back to your regularly scheduled programming... :)

seedsbelize 09-14-20 05:19 PM

My wife arrived home from the north country, last evening. Bearing two Servicio Corse and one Challenge Elite, plus three record hubs. I have the rims and will begin spoke calculations shortly. Can tubulars simply live stretched over rims or is there a shelf life for that type of storage?

smontanaro 09-14-20 05:45 PM


Originally Posted by ThermionicScott (Post 21694148)
I'm a little late to reply on this one, but JH has since clarified/walked-back past support for front tire pressures that were much lower than the rear: https://www.renehersecycles.com/myth...gher-pressure/

Thanks for the ThermionicScott .

JohnDThompson 09-14-20 08:10 PM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize (Post 21694323)
Can tubulars simply live stretched over rims or is there a shelf life for that type of storage?

My experience is that if they are stored away from UV light, ozone, excess moisture, etc. they can last at least a couple decades stretched on a rim.

fawudd 09-15-20 07:44 AM

I recently retrieved my old Vitus 979 with Vittoria sewups that had been sitting indoors away from UV for about 20 years. Amazingly, the tires look good, hold air well, and felt fine on a ride around the block. Then they went for a 10 mile ride while I waited for new tires to arrive, then another, then a 15 mile ride. These are flat rides with no high speeds. Even though the new tires arrived, I have repeatedly delayed making the change because it is not my main bike, and it rides as well as ever. 2 questions :

1. How risky do you think it is to keep using the tires for 10-15 mile flat rides at low speed ?
2. Once the tires are changed, and assuming they come off the rim in one piece, would you keep one of the existing tires as a spare?

Thanks

Classtime 09-15-20 08:02 AM

1. Low Risk
2. Yes

IME, old road tires can be very dry and loose their gripping power. Sudden changes in direction, even at slow speeds, could get exciting.

Lord Donnington 09-19-20 09:12 AM

Servizio Corse tires
 
I have had excellent use out of the Yellow Jersey sourced Taiwanese tubulars. My front has 1062 miles while the rear has 867. Tread is still good. I fix any punctures with a syringe of Stanís that I carry with me and it works very well. Vittoria Pit Stop needs to go back to the drawing board...

smontanaro 09-19-20 11:33 AM


Originally Posted by Lord Donnington (Post 21702272)
I fix any punctures with a syringe of Stanís ....

I trust removable valve cores? Or do you just use a needle-equipped syringe? I heard of that as a technique, but am not sure where you poke the tire, tread, casing or base tape?

seedsbelize 09-19-20 03:57 PM


Originally Posted by Lord Donnington (Post 21702272)
I have had excellent use out of the Yellow Jersey sourced Taiwanese tubulars. My front has 1062 miles while the rear has 867. Tread is still good. I fix any punctures with a syringe of Stanís that I carry with me and it works very well. Vittoria Pit Stop needs to go back to the drawing board...

I hadn't heard of the syringe method. But it makes sense. I am now awaiting tubular glue, from Amazon(the passenger airlines don't like to carry that stuff) while I source spokes and build wheels. I think Caffelatex is the closest I can come to Stan's in this part of the world. I was surprised at how easily they mounted to their rims, dry. Might be a good sign.

CV-6 09-19-20 07:55 PM


Originally Posted by seedsbelize (Post 21702848)
I hadn't heard of the syringe method. But it makes sense. I am now awaiting tubular glue, from Amazon(the passenger airlines don't like to carry that stuff) while I source spokes and build wheels. I think Caffelatex is the closest I can come to Stan's in this part of the world. I was surprised at how easily they mounted to their rims, dry. Might be a good sign.


On the wheel tubular repair. Pics don't show.

https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycl...re-repair.html


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