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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

johnnyspaghetti 12-09-17 08:11 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20042675)
These are hard to find. Much nicer looking than the big rounded aluminum modern ones and correct for early 60s Raleighs. The ferrules I've seen on older 50s Raleighs were the same as these but shorter.

I would think the longer ones may offer more support, or do they? The ferrules I have on my 60's bikes are oll good with the exception of the spiral casing coming out has been stressed in many different conditions of severity but ar some how still working and none have broken strands or in a untwisted conditon. Seeing is these are traped parts by the assy. process ai am lucky but using kid gloves to deal with. The less severe ends I was able to use some cheap clear vinyl 3/16 ID X 5/16 OD tube and slipped it on the over the casing from the caliper end using a heat gun to soften ti expandeed over that ball end and re shrunk down to size and fits snug & will move but has tensiton over the original casing. I'll go get a picture & edit my mess. this computer crashed wpower problem I will re du. And have pics and addition bs.

johnnyspaghetti 12-10-17 12:49 AM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 20042525)
Brake cable size, the step-down is just a little too large for the cable opening in the trigger.

I made this mod/repair of sorts on the trigger end of the cable. Not the brake. I am on a different pc now and need to be fikin' things on the communication so's I & maybe you understand

johnnyspaghetti 12-10-17 03:16 AM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20043775)
I made this mod/repair of sorts on the trigger end of the cable. Not the brake. I am on a different pc now and need to be fikin' things on the communication so's I & maybe you understand

OK then all that dinking with the pc's rather sucked. I took another bad picture. This seemed to help stabilize the end movement that seats on this ferrule and does a good job of stabilizing it and may offer some future protection although I take a semi concious efft to not bang the ends of cables on the bars. It is clear tube, definitely seen but you have to look. I do believe it protect it from further end fray of the fluted casing. As i look at my Raleighs I see the brake is larger and the $10 Tiawan Phillips(orwhatever)has perfect fluted white/cream cables in pristine un fettered condition & have the short ferrules. huh.

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...7568-local2&zw

Down the line I put another peice of the same at a minor kink/bend in this pic. this was simple & cheap been on there all summer. it is snug on the ferrule but a good fit on the casing without calling it slop.

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...7568-local1&zw

Velocivixen 12-10-17 11:04 AM

Those are nice. I have saved various ones off different 3 speeds but they look old.

BigChief 12-10-17 11:24 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20043473)
I would think the longer ones may offer more support, or do they? The ferrules I have on my 60's bikes are oll good with the exception of the spiral casing coming out has been stressed in many different conditions of severity but ar some how still working and none have broken strands or in a untwisted conditon. Seeing is these are traped parts by the assy. process ai am lucky but using kid gloves to deal with. The less severe ends I was able to use some cheap clear vinyl 3/16 ID X 5/16 OD tube and slipped it on the over the casing from the caliper end using a heat gun to soften ti expandeed over that ball end and re shrunk down to size and fits snug & will move but has tensiton over the original casing. I'll go get a picture & edit my mess. this computer crashed wpower problem I will re du. And have pics and addition bs.

This is the older style from the 50s. Cables got replaced over the years so ferrules and old style housings are very rare. So if you ever run across any...hang on to em. Even if they're in rough shape.

Attachment 591842

johnnyspaghetti 12-10-17 03:26 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20044279)
This is the older style from the 50s. Cables got replaced over the years so ferrules and old style housings are very rare. So if you ever run across any...hang on to em. Even if they're in rough shape.

Attachment 591842

With a step in them. I see. Good Knowledge. thank you.

johnnyspaghetti 12-12-17 06:48 PM

I need to see what I can do with this one. What a shame, the cable is intact, no fray/breaks. The spiral winding is some what mangled as you all can see. This is the result of a poor front wire basket installation.

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...8352-local2&zw
https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...8352-local1&zw

browngw 12-12-17 10:28 PM

I'm of a different mind when it comes to cables, housings, brake pads, grips and chains. If new is available and will work, I change them. They are still very special bikes even wearing new "consumables". Sometimes concessions are made like "new" cloth bar tape but generally think a bike looks well sorted with newer components.

johnnyspaghetti 12-13-17 12:59 AM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 20049625)
I'm of a different mind when it comes to cables, housings, brake pads, grips and chains. If new is available and will work, I change them. They are still very special bikes even wearing new "consumables". Sometimes concessions are made like "new" cloth bar tape but generally think a bike looks well sorted with newer components.

There is a point when I have to agree and maybe I'm just beating a dead horse.

However to replace a cable or a casing section is one thing but this is a complete original cable assembly w/swedgged ends and so far I believe with a little tweeking can straighten that end out & get it to slide freely again on this other wise good assembly.

BigChief 12-13-17 03:38 AM


Originally Posted by browngw (Post 20049625)
I'm of a different mind when it comes to cables, housings, brake pads, grips and chains. If new is available and will work, I change them. They are still very special bikes even wearing new "consumables". Sometimes concessions are made like "new" cloth bar tape but generally think a bike looks well sorted with newer components.

Yes, I agree. It's just that preserving or copying original features is one aspect of this hobby I enjoy. I'll preserve original cable housings when ever I can. I like being faced with mechanical puzzles and solving them.

johnnyspaghetti 12-13-17 11:13 AM

I didn't get white shrink tube for nothing. Lubed, turns freely, sliding well. Only had to dink around with it for less than a hour.

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...0720-local2&zw

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...0720-local1&zw

gster 12-13-17 02:28 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20049778)
Yes, I agree. It's just that preserving or copying original features is one aspect of this hobby I enjoy. I'll preserve original cable housings when ever I can. I like being faced with mechanical puzzles and solving them.

Despite their age, the older, ribbed cable housings are more flexible than the modern ones and seem to follow a better path to the rear of the bikes. In particular, the brake cable as it rolls over the top bar.

clubman 12-13-17 06:39 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20050906)
Despite their age, the older, ribbed cable housings are more flexible than the modern ones

Absolutely. You'd be hard pressed to feel a difference between well-used set of pre-1960 ribbed Raleigh cables with an NOS pair. Clarks made great brake Raleigh pattern cables as well.

BigChief 12-13-17 09:12 PM

So far, I have always been able to reuse the old cable housings even when I had to replace the inner cable. Usually due to a broken cable strand or sometimes rust on the inner cable. Most of the time, the ball ends on the older style Raleigh brake cables are made of steel so you can remove them with a torch and silver solder them onto a new cable. Sometimes, they're pot metal cast onto the end and just melt. In that case, I saw off and drill through a cap screw with a head that fits the caliper and solder that on. For shifter cables, I've been attaching short sections of 3/32" brass tubing with JB Weld. I've never tried patching broken sections of housing cover with shrink tubing. Sounds like a good idea.

johnnyspaghetti 12-14-17 06:32 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20051636)
I've never tried patching broken sections of housing cover with shrink tubing. Sounds like a good idea.

This shrink tube is what Homedepot offered and I consider low quality & limited to 3" lengths. It does make things look better but this particular shrink tube found in packs of 5 pieces for $1.19 offers no support where the housing kinked at the end of the ferrule and is a weakened spot in the spring like housing winding. I will need to find a way to extend the end of the ferrule to add support past the weakened spot. All shrink tube/crimp couplings were not created equal and there are far better products that will not only shrink, ID will seal and then harden very stiff.

Attachment 592202

BigChief 12-14-17 07:47 AM

Ah, you've got a trickier puzzle to solve. I thought it was only the covering that was damaged. The housing is bent. But! It looks like it's only a 1/4" or so from the end. I'll bet there's enough slack to sacrifice that small amount of housing. You could also move the fulcrum clip forward or the shifter back to make up for it.
What I would do is take some cable cutters and snip off the end of the inner cable and remove it, trim off the bent housing and set up the shifter again with a brand new inner cable in the old housing. Now the easy way to do this is to use a modern Sturmey archer inner cable with the pinch bolt adapter on the indicator. Or you could have even more fun making up your own inner cable using a standard shifter cable and the 3/32" brass tubing I mentioned earlier.

nlerner 12-14-17 12:10 PM

I've actually been able to trim housing like that without removing the inner cable. It's a bit tricky and you need some very good wire cutters, but you can stretch the part of the coiled housing out a bit, giving you enough space to snip it without snipping the inner cable. You might need two needle nose pliers to do that: one to pull and one to hold the coiled end near where the housing is still good.

agmetal 12-14-17 12:36 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Some of you may remember the lightly-used ANT roadster frame I picked up a while ago. It had been built be given away as a raffle prize, so the original build included several parts that were lower-end than a full custom build might use, including a generic fork. I picked up the frame, including the generic fork and front rack, and built it up as a more practical take on my 1937 Raleigh Tourist. I recently had the idea to get a custom fork built for it, to make it look and feel more like a real roadster, and commissioned one from another Boston-area builder, Royal H Cycles, who was recommended to me by another builder. Mike Flanigan isn't really building bikes under the ANT name anymore, and gave his blessing to have Bryan do it. I'm quite happy with the result!

agmetal 12-14-17 12:42 PM

3 Attachment(s)
More...

BigChief 12-14-17 03:37 PM


Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 20052600)
I've actually been able to trim housing like that without removing the inner cable. It's a bit tricky and you need some very good wire cutters, but you can stretch the part of the coiled housing out a bit, giving you enough space to snip it without snipping the inner cable. You might need two needle nose pliers to do that: one to pull and one to hold the coiled end near where the housing is still good.

Interesting. I can see how that could work. It does sound like a tricky operation. I love this kind of stuff!

arty dave 12-14-17 04:28 PM

Yes agmetal, much nicer with the curvier forks. I bought a 2nd hand 'modern roadster' last year, a Papillionaire with 8 internal gears. I changed out the stem and handlebars as they were the stand out modern parts, but the lack of decent curve in the forks still bugs me a little. It's a great ride though. What kind of handlebars are on the ANT roadster?

While we're on cables - when I set up the shifter on the DL-1, I was stuck for something to crimp on one end of the cable. I used the metal tip from a ball point 'gel' pen - they fit the cable really well. I'll have to buy some proper swages for the next cable I do.

I picked up a couple of parts for the DL-1 - a 46 tooth herons crank, as the non-raleigh crank I was using had started rubbing against the bottom bracket cup. And at the local tip shop a modern Sturmey Archer XLRD5 for $10. The gears are seized, but the 90mm drum brake component will hopefully help the DL-1's front hub to stop me better :)

agmetal 12-14-17 05:05 PM


Originally Posted by arty dave (Post 20053184)
Yes agmetal, much nicer with the curvier forks. I bought a 2nd hand 'modern roadster' last year, a Papillionaire with 8 internal gears. I changed out the stem and handlebars as they were the stand out modern parts, but the lack of decent curve in the forks still bugs me a little. It's a great ride though. What kind of handlebars are on the ANT roadster?

It started off with a Dutch-style handlebar from Virtue (visible in the "before" picture), but I recently replaced it with a VO Montmartre bar. I'd planned to use the VO bar originally, but had thought that it wouldn't fit both the brake lever and grip, and didn't realize until recently that there was actually space. The Virtue handlebar is about 10cm wider than the VO one, and the grip areas are angled outward a bit more, and I wanted the narrow width and nearly-parallel grips of the Montmartre bar, because that's more similar to the '37 Raleigh that the build is based on.

johnnyspaghetti 12-17-17 07:38 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Had to share this.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/1961-Raleig....c100338.m3726

Attachment 592488

johnnyspaghetti 12-17-17 08:59 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Advertised as a 1948 amazingly sold as a 1984 but I see a 1960 year model?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1948-Vintag....c100338.m3726

Attachment 592498

gster 12-17-17 09:57 AM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20057522)

Beautiful example. I'd be afraid to take it out of the house...

BigChief 12-17-17 11:49 AM

I love that Superbe!! The stepthrough could be 48. Early 50s at the latest. The lug shape, large Made In England transfer, button oiler in the BB, the patent stem , are all pre54. I don't think the transfers look like the sports tourist in the 1948 catalog, but those things aren't certain.

clubman 12-17-17 03:10 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20057718)
Beautiful example. I'd be afraid to take it out of the house...

Here's the womans equivalent in a Sports for a mere $250 cdn. A bargoon in comparison.

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-cruiser-comm...ationFlag=true

gster 12-17-17 03:34 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20058206)
Here's the womans equivalent in a Sports for a mere $250 cdn. A bargoon in comparison.

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-cruiser-comm...ationFlag=true

That's a nice bike and a fair price.
Attachment 592538

browngw 12-17-17 03:51 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20058251)
That's a nice bike and a fair price.
Attachment 592538


Is that a "Glider" decal on the downtube? It is a very nice bike and the new tires look good and add to the value.

clubman 12-17-17 04:33 PM

Good catch. Yes it's the Eatons Glider rebranded Raleigh. New tires, not originals, still adds value.


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