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-   -   How fer did you ride today?! (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1081695)

rsbob 02-25-24 09:32 PM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23167165)
Thanks, Peacock/NBC should hire me to be a color commentator for the TDF. I might make it 1/2 a broadcast before I slip up and say something highly inappropriate...actually, maybe they shouldn't hire me.

Not too much commentary about today's XC race...20 miles and 1600-1800' depending on who's head unit you trust. I thought I was going to be dead, but I actually felt pretty good considering the 90ish miles of yesterday. I didn't feel like playing pack tactics with the lead group, so I just spun my own laps out and ended up 4th. Looking at timing, after the race, I should've pushed a bit harder, as I ended up finishing pretty close to 3rd.

Your post on the Zone 2 thread regarding increasing your FTP inspired me to take it easy for a change and actually ride Z2 without sprints, and all out efforts to generate max watts. Put on Netflix and ZWIFT while monitoring my HR. After 2 hours of a very unsatisfying ride - I enjoy pushing it - I called it an afternoon.

P.S. Some colorful language doing color commentary on the TdF would make my day - and probably Bob Roll’s.

Leinster 02-25-24 10:27 PM

About a half mile to the river park, where I took my 5yo son’s training wheels off for the first time, and within seconds he was zipping around the place.

Sierra_rider 02-26-24 12:02 AM


Originally Posted by rsbob (Post 23167544)
Your post on the Zone 2 thread regarding increasing your FTP inspired me to take it easy for a change and actually ride Z2 without sprints, and all out efforts to generate max watts. Put on Netflix and ZWIFT while monitoring my HR. After 2 hours of a very unsatisfying ride - I enjoy pushing it - I called it an afternoon.

P.S. Some colorful language doing color commentary on the TdF would make my day - and probably Bob Roll’s.

Yeah, the boring zone 2 trainer sessions aren't the most enjoyable...I'd be hammering almost every ride/session if I could. I started really lumping the zone 2 stuff in when I was just trying to add volume to my week and increase race fitness. Even if I never entered another race again, the fitness benefit really makes the local all-day rides enjoyable...before I started adding structure to my riding, I remember how smoked I'd be at the end of a big ride through the mountains. I still get smoked, I just get to ride further.:lol:

My commentary would be reminiscent of the subject of a work evaluation I received several years ago. Basically, it said that I need to choose my words more carefully and that I should think carefully before I speak. The eval also said that I "took shortcuts to safety," which I was particularly proud of. I'm much better now and can almost pass as a normal member of society.

rsbob 02-26-24 12:12 AM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23167609)
Yeah, the boring zone 2 trainer sessions aren't the most enjoyable...I'd be hammering almost every ride/session if I could. I started really lumping the zone 2 stuff in when I was just trying to add volume to my week and increase race fitness. Even if I never entered another race again, the fitness benefit really makes the local all-day rides enjoyable...before I started adding structure to my riding, I remember how smoked I'd be at the end of a big ride through the mountains. I still get smoked, I just get to ride further.:lol:

My commentary would be reminiscent of the subject of a work evaluation I received several years ago. Basically, it said that I need to choose my words more carefully and that I should think carefully before I speak. The eval also said that I "took shortcuts to safety," which I was particularly proud of. I'm much better now and can almost pass as a normal member of society.



Entirely overrated. And choose your words more carefully? FTS

indyfabz 02-27-24 12:20 PM

9 miles today.
9 miles for the month.
9 miles for the year.

jaxgtr 02-27-24 10:28 PM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23167609)
My commentary would be reminiscent of the subject of a work evaluation I received several years ago. Basically, it said that I need to choose my words more carefully and that I should think carefully before I speak. The eval also said that I "took shortcuts to safety," which I was particularly proud of. I'm much better now and can almost pass as a normal member of society.


LOL... I was told once that I was too honest and direct and some people did not like that. I responded that being honest and direct eliminated miscommunication and that is the only way I operated. She just shook her head and said unless I had anything else, that is all she had for me. It was the fastest review I ever had, less than 10 mins.

rsbob 02-27-24 10:42 PM


Originally Posted by jaxgtr (Post 23165599)
Was horsing around with my dog on Thursday and he gets pretty mouthy sometimes when he gets really excited and the little bugger caught my hand right at the base under my thumb leaving a 2 stitch hole. Luckily, It does not really bother me too much, so I got in 20 miles and 5oo ft of climbing.

Sorry to hear that. Dog bites, even friendly ones, can lead to a nasty infection. Hope it was irrigated well before stitched. (Was bitten trying to get an unfriendly dog off my sweet dog - 3 stitches).

jaxgtr 02-27-24 10:54 PM


Originally Posted by rsbob (Post 23169610)
Sorry to hear that. Dog bites, even friendly ones, can lead to a nasty infection. Hope it was irrigated well before stitched. (Was bitten trying to get an unfriendly dog off my sweet dog - 3 stitches).


Yep, my wife is a nurse and we have a portable ER in our hall closet and she is actually the person that put the stitches in. It was a little bruised for a few days, but she pulled the stitches Monday and all is good.

rsbob 02-27-24 10:54 PM

How Fur did I ride today? At least he could have spelled ‘fur’ correctly..;)

After two days of Z2, today was a real 2 hours riding a fake 30 miles with 3,400’ in the Surrey hills. Tonight my legs don’t feel like it was too fake.

Sierra_rider 02-28-24 12:28 AM

Took a rest day yesterday, figured I earned it after back-to-back race days. I was planning on getting a couple hours of zone 2 in on the trainer, as my legs still aren't quite 100%. However, I was extra busy fixing other peoples' problems at work today, so I was time crunched and sacrificed time for intensity. Ended up doing 12 sets of 30" intervals @700ish watts(with 2 minutes recovery.) In reality, I wasn't able to ride the intervals at my best wattage, so not as productive as possible.

Anyway, 7 miles in virtual France, with virtual feet, and only 51 real minutes.

TomM 02-28-24 10:46 AM

Rode a short 25K this afternoon along the Seine.


https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...8c359d2555.jpg

rsbob 02-28-24 10:53 AM

Addendum to yesterday’s ride. Did my workout from 5 to 7 PM and really hammered it, more so than usual. Felt pretty tired after a beer and late dinner and went to bed. About an hour later awakened wide awake and laid in bed for an hour and there was no way I could sleep. Was awake from midnight to 4:30 AM and during that time I queried, “The Google” and read up on Exercise Induced Insomnia. Happens to be quite a lot written on the subject. Hard workouts produce high levels of cortisol and adrenaline which endure in the system for hours. Bingo. No more late hard workouts.

Credit for my late workout goes to my labradoodle who ripped out four staples holding his recent incision together and a hasty last minute trip to the vet.

Sierra_rider 03-01-24 08:23 PM


Originally Posted by rsbob (Post 23169943)
Addendum to yesterday’s ride. Did my workout from 5 to 7 PM and really hammered it, more so than usual. Felt pretty tired after a beer and late dinner and went to bed. About an hour later awakened wide awake and laid in bed for an hour and there was no way I could sleep. Was awake from midnight to 4:30 AM and during that time I queried, “The Google” and read up on Exercise Induced Insomnia. Happens to be quite a lot written on the subject. Hard workouts produce high levels of cortisol and adrenaline which endure in the system for hours. Bingo. No more late hard workouts.

Credit for my late workout goes to my labradoodle who ripped out four staples holding his recent incision together and a hasty last minute trip to the vet.

I have that issue with insomnia. It's at it's worst after long/hard events, but still a frequent issue. I'll fall asleep quite easily, but then be wide awake at 3:30 in the AM...almost always at 3:30. I think I read somewhere that cortisol levels peak around that time, but I may just be misremembering that tidbit of info. Even if it happens without the stressful workout component, it still comes along with an elevated resting HR and decreased HR variability.

Sierra_rider 03-01-24 08:45 PM

The arrival of the crappy weather coincided perfectly with the recovery week I had planned, I'm expecting 24" of fresh powder overnight.

Today was 2 hours of easy indoor zone 2 at an average of 240 watts. Split between 2 Rouvy routes(but all in the same block of riding,) I did 33 virtual miles and 3800' of virtual climbing.

Troul 03-01-24 09:23 PM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23172385)
I have that issue with insomnia. It's at it's worst after long/hard events, but still a frequent issue. I'll fall asleep quite easily, but then be wide awake at 3:30 in the AM...almost always at 3:30. I think I read somewhere that cortisol levels peak around that time, but I may just be misremembering that tidbit of info. Even if it happens without the stressful workout component, it still comes along with an elevated resting HR and decreased HR variability.

circadian rhythm plays a role in how well you'll sleep too. It's not an onesie (one size fits all) & your body has its own cycle which can conflict with your environment.
We often overlook it & think circadian rhythm is supposed to align with the 9 to 5 work week.... when that is not the case.

rsbob 03-01-24 09:27 PM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23172385)
I have that issue with insomnia. It's at its hatworst after long/hard events, but still a frequent issue. I'll fall asleep quite easily, but then be wide awake at 3:30 in the AM...almost always at 3:30. I think I read somewhere that cortisol levels peak around that time, but I may just be misremembering that tidbit of info. Even if it happens without the stressful workout component, it still comes along with an elevated resting HR and decreased HR variability.

Interesting that you have the same experience - helps validate the studies.

Alcohol - a drink or two - has the same effect. Evidently alcohol suppresses the CNS and it takes a few hours to clear the system and when it does the CNS overcompensates. The result is being wide awake and unable to go back to sleep until it recedes back to a normal state. And amazingly, 3-3:30 is also the witching hour. If I drink four glasses of wine (my limit - and a rare exception) then I will sleep all night. Not recommended.

So the question is; does riding a hard event AND having alcohol after have a compounding effect on insomnia? I am not going to be the guinea pig.

Think I will pose exercise induced insomnia on the Road Cycling forum and see what the brain trust comes up with - should be weird as usual.

Sierra_rider 03-01-24 10:12 PM


Originally Posted by Troul (Post 23172434)
circadian rhythm plays a role in how well you'll sleep too. It's not an onesie (one size fits all) & your body has its own cycle which can conflict with your environment.
We often overlook it & think circadian rhythm is supposed to align with the 9 to 5 work week.... when that is not the case.

I think my sleep "zone" is just a narrow window of time. I make an effort to go to bed around 10-11pm, but I could totally stay up all night if I didn't have that discipline. On the flip side, I also seem to naturally wake up at an early time as well. I average more than this, but I feel fully functional with 6 hours of sleep. I've even had as little as 4 hours before a big event and suffered little in the way of deficits from it. Probably my biggest issue with sleep like that, is that I end up having stomach issues that day.


Originally Posted by rsbob (Post 23172439)
Interesting that you have the same experience - helps validate the studies.

Alcohol - a drink or two - has the same effect. Evidently alcohol suppresses the CNS and it takes a few hours to clear the system and when it does the CNS overcompensates. The result is being wide awake and unable to go back to sleep until it recedes back to a normal state. And amazingly, 3-3:30 is also the witching hour. If I drink four glasses of wine (my limit - and a rare exception) then I will sleep all night. Not recommended.

So the question is; does riding a hard event AND having alcohol after have a compounding effect on insomnia? I am not going to be the guinea pig.

Think I will pose exercise induced insomnia on the Road Cycling forum and see what the brain trust comes up with - should be weird as usual.

I'll add that there seems to be a threshold of event/ride hardness, where I don't have the insomnia issue past that threshold. I can think of some mountainous centuries that I rode at a hard pace...instead of the insomnia that I get from the 60-80 mile rides, I just crashed out for 8 hours...and I sometimes end up waking up fresher than I would after those moderately-hard 60-80 mile rides. Our body systems are fascinating things.

I really like to drink(mostly Irish and German lineage,) but force myself to partake in moderation. I could get away with heavy drinking in my 20's, but nowadays even a few drinks within a few hours of bedtime, leaves me waking up with night sweats. I have experimented with copious amounts of alcohol after a hard event, but it was a social thing, rather than in the name of science. I was absolutely $#%*ed for sleep and recovering after that.

Funny you mention the witching hour, it's likely that psychological phenomena have contributed to this folklore. Reminds me of a guy I used to work with at a previous fire station assignment. He woke up one morning pale as a ghost...he didn't want to tell us what was wrong, but finally relented after enough pressure from us. Said he woke up around that time, to some demon sitting on his chest and pinning him down. Some Googling on our part and turns out that's a common symptom of sleep paralysis. Easy to see how, before the age of science, we could develop folklore to explain such things.

rsbob 03-01-24 10:33 PM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23172465)
I think my sleep "zone" is just a narrow window of time. I make an effort to go to bed around 10-11pm, but I could totally stay up all night if I didn't have that discipline. On the flip side, I also seem to naturally wake up at an early time as well. I average more than this, but I feel fully functional with 6 hours of sleep. I've even had as little as 4 hours before a big event and suffered little in the way of deficits from it. Probably my biggest issue with sleep like that, is that I end up having stomach issues that day.



I'll add that there seems to be a threshold of event/ride hardness, where I don't have the insomnia issue past that threshold. I can think of some mountainous centuries that I rode at a hard pace...instead of the insomnia that I get from the 60-80 mile rides, I just crashed out for 8 hours...and I sometimes end up waking up fresher than I would after those moderately-hard 60-80 mile rides. Our body systems are fascinating things.

I really like to drink(mostly Irish and German lineage,) but force myself to partake in moderation. I could get away with heavy drinking in my 20's, but nowadays even a few drinks within a few hours of bedtime, leaves me waking up with night sweats. I have experimented with copious amounts of alcohol after a hard event, but it was a social thing, rather than in the name of science. I was absolutely $#%*ed for sleep and recovering after that.

Funny you mention the witching hour, it's likely that psychological phenomena have contributed to this folklore. Reminds me of a guy I used to work with at a previous fire station assignment. He woke up one morning pale as a ghost...he didn't want to tell us what was wrong, but finally relented after enough pressure from us. Said he woke up around that time, to some demon sitting on his chest and pinning him down. Some Googling on our part and turns out that's a common symptom of sleep paralysis. Easy to see how, before the age of science, we could develop folklore to explain such things.

Holy crapolie, I had that experience once in high school - scared the living s out of me. Could not move a pinkie. It was total body paralysis. But remembering that in some sleep states, the body does go into a state of paralysis, which makes me think that the brain erroneously wakes up at the wrong time - and then the brain says, WTF!

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/healt...leep-paralysis.

During a sleep paralysis episode, you're aware of your surroundings but cannot move or speak. But you can still move your eyes and breathe. Many people hear or see things that aren’t there (hallucinations), making episodes even more frightening.” <-your friend’s demon hallucination (that I did not have)

I am half German and half Swiss (same thing really?) and through my 40s could drink like a fish and never got sick - but hangovers were a waste of the following day - so gave massive drinking up. Now am a lot more cautious.

calamarichris 03-01-24 11:13 PM

[QUOTE=rsbob;23172476]“During a sleep paralysis episode, you're aware of your surroundings but cannot move or speak. But you can still move your eyes and breathe. Many people hear or see things that aren’t there (hallucinations), making episodes even more frightening.”
[
/QUOTE]

Sounds like "Night Terrors". I used to get those when I was young and in the Army. Not quite awake, not quite dreaming, but you can see someone coming to kill you with a Rambo-knife to stab you multiple times. Your brain screams "GET THE F UP AND FIGHT!" but your semi-sleeping body says, "No, no. If you hold still, they'll leave you alone." And so you lay there with your whole body clenched, waiting to either get bayoneted to death or not. Dreaming? Kinda. Awake? Who knows?

Happened dozens of times. But then I had to share sleeping quarters with some deranged interesting fellow Americans in uniform of varied backgrounds. When you're averaging ~5 hours of sleep per night (and skipping sleep altogether twice a month to pull CQ), you're never fully awake. I knew guys who'd suck on straight coffee grounds, like chewing tobacco to "Cope".

rsbob 03-02-24 12:12 AM

[QUOTE=calamarichris;23172491]

Originally Posted by rsbob (Post 23172476)
During a sleep paralysis episode, you're aware of your surroundings but cannot move or speak. But you can still move your eyes and breathe. Many people hear or see things that aren’t there (hallucinations), making episodes even more frightening.”
[
/QUOTE]

Sounds like "Night Terrors". I used to get those when I was young and in the Army. Not quite awake, not quite dreaming, but you can see someone coming to kill you with a Rambo-knife to stab you multiple times. Your brain screams "GET THE F UP AND FIGHT!" but your semi-sleeping body says, "No, no. If you hold still, they'll leave you alone." And so you lay there with your whole body clenched, waiting to either get bayoneted to death or not. Dreaming? Kinda. Awake? Who knows?

Happened dozens of times. But then I had to share sleeping quarters with some deranged interesting fellow Americans in uniform of varied backgrounds. When you're averaging ~5 hours of sleep per night (and skipping sleep altogether twice a month to pull CQ), you're never fully awake. I knew guys who'd suck on straight coffee grounds, like chewing tobacco to "Cope".

That sounded positively horrible besides waiting to be bayoneted. Good grief.

calamarichris 03-02-24 05:04 AM

[QUOTE=rsbob;23172505]

Originally Posted by calamarichris (Post 23172491)
That sounded positively horrible besides waiting to be bayoneted. Good grief.

Later, I had one roommate from Philly who admitted to shooting a guy to death when he was 15. He grew up in a bad neighborhood in the crack era.. He was actually a really nice guy.

And another guy from an Appalachian state who was sharpening his bayonet on a whetstone the first time I met him/walked into the room. I said, "Hey, I'm Chris. How's it going?" He just looked at me while licking his whetstone and went back to sharpening his bayonet without saying a word. Fortunately only roommates with him for 2-3 weeks. He never talked much.

Had another prodigy of a roommate from Pennsylvania who insisted on hanging a Confederate flag on his wall. We had a black company commander. I explained to him why this wasn't the best idea, but he was adamant. Not the sharpest needle in the sewing drawer. But we both looked like @-holes during a barracks inspection.

jaxgtr 03-02-24 01:04 PM

Was sick all week, Wed and Thursday, light fever..., Friday felt a little better. Decided to try and ride inside today since we have rain coming and going. It started off rough, but once the legs warmed up and loosened up, I was all in, did 106 miles 1k ft of climbing. Legs not so good now, :injured:

Sierra_rider 03-02-24 01:54 PM

No outdoor riding today, as this is looking out my front porch:
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ac02f9b836.jpg

There hasn't been nearly as much snow as predicted, although the blizzard warning lasts through tomorrow. The power did go out last night, killed my white-noise maker, so I could hear the wind and the creaking of 125' tall pine trees.

Came back on this morning, so I did a Rouvy ride on some of the "Strade Bianche" roads. In total, 27 miles and 3200' of climbing.

rsbob 03-02-24 03:38 PM


Originally Posted by Sierra_rider (Post 23172962)
No outdoor riding today, as this is looking out my front porch:
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...ac02f9b836.jpg

There hasn't been nearly as much snow as predicted, although the blizzard warning lasts through tomorrow. The power did go out last night, killed my white-noise maker, so I could hear the wind and the creaking of 125' tall pine trees.

Came back on this morning, so I did a Rouvy ride on some of the "Strade Bianche" roads. In total, 27 miles and 3200' of climbing.

Damn. Was wondering how your were making out. Read there were winds in one area in the Sierras clocked at 180. Insanity. Good to have power and you back on the Rouvy

Sierra_rider 03-02-24 04:16 PM


Originally Posted by rsbob (Post 23173050)
Damn. Was wondering how your were making out. Read there were winds in one area in the Sierras clocked at 180. Insanity. Good to have power and you back on the Rouvy

Wouldn't surprise me if that 180mph wind gust was recorded at the local ski resort. It never gets that crazy at my house, but that particular resort is in the top 10 list of highest wind gusts ever recorded. Depending on the source, they either had a 209 or 199mph wind gust a few years ago. Nearby to that also holds the record for thes deepest single season snowfall on earth.

I'm about 1/2 the elevation of those spots, so the weather extremes are much more mundane here. The worst apart about the wind here, is just worrying if trees are going to fall. I've cleared most of the tall trees that were leaning towards my house, but I still have a couple to go.Most of what's left are big enough to do a number on my roof, but probably aren't going to kill me in my sleep.


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