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Anyone shift from cycling to running?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Anyone shift from cycling to running?

Old 01-26-23, 03:30 PM
  #26  
aglaeca2
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Originally Posted by Senathon
If you planning to do any marathons, I recommend reading some books from Jeff Galloway. The text are out of date, but the basics are there. The only reason why I switched from running to biking because I was not prepared for the Boston as much as I thought. That is a killer run.
I've been doing both since 2001 (cycling came first. During one century I discovered that my cardiovascular capacity, from running, was higher than the strength of my cycling muscles. I was able to hyperventilate some more speed. However, thereafter I adjusted my training to better reflect what I was training for.
However, since I haven't done an event in 10 years I'm consistently both.
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Old 01-26-23, 03:35 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by seypat
Well, if you're serious, I'll give you a brief rundown of the 3 BQ races I have experience with:


MCM is the people's marathon. Big time with lots of energy around the event. Logistics can be difficult because of the big city. Nice course, relatively flat. Can still be hot there even in October. Overall experience is good. They moved the package pick up back to the Armory this past year. Logistics for getting your packet are not very good.

Richmond is billed as the friendliest marathon. Good size, not too small or big. Pretty, scenic course, relatively flat. Enthusiastic crowds. Usually good weather, but can be cold, hot or in between. Most years, you're running in the 40s to 50. The city/area does a good job of putting on the event. Package pickup is not close to downtown where the race is held. Without a car you'll have to Uber it.

The Shamrock in VA Beach is a big, rolling St. Patrick's Day party! You better like the color green. Flat course except for an overpass you go over on the way out/in. Course is not very exciting. You do run through Fort Story and on the boardwalk along the beach/ocean. Awesome after party. The weather there in March can be hit or miss. It's either nice and sunny, or rainy, windy and F-N cold!
I will run a marathon and may or may not BQ but I prefer to start with a goal. Steamboat, Sacramento, North Bend are the courses that I had targeted either due to proximity of family and/or speed.

I was just looking for guidance on learning technique. It seems to me that running technique is more technical than cycling or at least that is my impression from long distance hiking. I can hike 26 miles with a pack in the mountains, I just do not know how to run. There is a really fast lady marathoner around here and she has a very fast cadence, mine is very slow and long and wrong.
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Old 01-26-23, 04:12 PM
  #28  
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Contact a loca running club. They can get you started. You can train for distances up to a half marathon by yourself in your neighborhood. For a full, it's better to train with a group mainly for the longer runs.

I train with this local group each year. Sportbackers is the organization that produces the Richmond races. Supposedly, they had around 1900 total runners(counting the vitrual and walking team) split into the various sub teams last year. That's a 23 week program. You can look at the training manual to get an idea of the training load.

https://www.richmondmarathon.org/mar...training-team/

https://www.sportsbackers.org/traini...training-team/
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Old 01-26-23, 05:17 PM
  #29  
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Running is a very natural thing, and while some people discuss heel-striking and cadence and all of those things, I don't believe there is much evidence to support the idea of consciously trying to change your stride for performance/injury prevention. As your fitness improves and you work on range of motion, correcting muscle imbalances, strength training, etc., your stride will naturally change and adapt. Everybody is different!
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Old 01-26-23, 06:06 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by superdex
But a similar urge has been developing, knowing that at this age, I need to be doing something for long-term health that's above the hips.
I feel the same given that cycling and hiking are my only exercise. Let's research rowing machines!
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Old 01-26-23, 06:44 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by GhostRider62
Thanks

4:05 would be my qualifying time. I understand this to be around VO2 of 30 ml/kg pace if what I read is correct or maybe zone 2 for 4 hours or about 9:20 miles. Presumably I should be able to do below 4 hours. Of course none of the Townies bothered with qualifying back in the day. 4:05 qualified 11/12 past races and 3:57 qualified 12/12, so, I would target 3:55 and sub 9 minute miles overall if that makes sense.

Thanks
3:10 for me- I don’t think I could sniff that.
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Old 01-27-23, 11:49 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
I feel the same given that cycling and hiking are my only exercise. Let's research rowing machines!
HA ! I have one already!
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Old 02-05-23, 11:32 PM
  #33  
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Kinda sorta. I have gotten back into the pool and started running again in order to do an off-road triathlon in Tahoe this summer. I thought that the swimming would be harder to get back into, but it’s been the running. My CV fitness is outstripping my musculoskeletal fitness for sure. It’s literally jarring.
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Old 02-06-23, 12:40 PM
  #34  
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I have been training with the FIRST: Run Less, Run Faster method. Reading the book, but there are sites as well. You only run three times a week (speed intervals, tempo, long run) and then do other cardio work twice a week, which I use for cycling. Cannot lose all my cycling gains, so the FIRST method allows me to bike.
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Old 02-06-23, 07:24 PM
  #35  
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Lately I have been running in winter, instead of my morning ride. I did not know about the bone density thing @RB1-luvr but I am late fiftites too so thank you.

When I first got into cycling, from jogging, in my early forties I used to do a 10k run once a year and place quite well despite not having run at all, simply because the cycling had made me thinner and fitter.
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Old 02-07-23, 09:03 AM
  #36  
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Was a long time runner and did a few marathons but after a hip replacement my running days were over.
This is what I've found out in the 8 years since which very much surprised me. I do miss running though.As a lifelong runner I appreciate there are certainly advantages to running over cycling but many people aren’t aware of the advantages cycling has except perhaps for number 1.

1. Joints- Less pounding.

2. Ride out of the saddle and you are exercising different muscles

3. HIIT- Cyclists can mix in high intensity interval training anytime on their ride regardless of how long or short the ride is. For example, whether you’re riding for 30 minutes, an hour or longer a cyclist can sprint then slow down, then sprint again and repeat as often as needed. Runners rarely mix HIIT with long runs. Cyclists do it all the time just by pedaling up challenging hills.

4. Time Riding- Cyclists can ride longer which is great cardiovascular exercise. I lowered my resting heart rate by 5 beats

5. Muscle Mass- Cycling can help build muscle mass.

6. Balance- Running has no equivalent to balancing on your bike as you cycle. Cyclists can work on their balance by riding no hands. Cyclists have to maintain balance as they take fast corners and do fast descents. There really isn’t an equivalent for runners.

7. Hand Eye Coordination- Cyclists have to constantly pay attention to potholes, cracks, sand, drain covers, cars and adjust very quickly. Great for riders as they grow older.

8. Breaks- Cyclists can stop for a minute, a few minutes or even longer for a snack, a meal, then get back on the bike. Not easy for a runner to stop for 15-20 minutes and then start running again.

9. Cadence- regardless of the terrain cyclists can change gears throughout the ride to accommodate different training goals. Easy or hard pedaling is a cyclists choice and it can vary on different rides or during the same ride. And it’s easy to measure and track cadence.

10. Arms, Hands and Wrists are in constant use when you ride. Add standing and they get more use. For runners they are basically along for the ride!
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Old 02-07-23, 10:06 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by seypat
MCM is the people's marathon. Big time with lots of energy around the event. Logistics can be difficult because of the big city. Nice course, relatively flat. Can still be hot there even in October. Overall experience is good. They moved the package pick up back to the Armory this past year. Logistics for getting your packet are not very good.
I’ve run the MCM a few times, however it’s been years since I last ran it. At that time registration was low enough that everyone got in, it’s wasn’t a lottery for registration, and I believe it is now. As stated…it is a nice, relatively flat course. That is until the last ¼ mile running up the hill to the Iwo Jima memorial. As I recall, the course is/was lined almost every step of the way with uniformed military personnel volunteering to assist runners with whatever they need. Running through Georgetown is also fun with crowds of students out cheering on the runners.

Dan

Last edited by _ForceD_; 02-07-23 at 10:33 AM.
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Old 02-07-23, 10:23 AM
  #38  
seypat
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Originally Posted by _ForceD_
I’ve run the MCM a few times, however it’s been years since I last ran it. At that time registration was low enough that every got in, it’s wasn’t a lottery for registration, and I believe it is now. As stated…it is a nice, relatively flat course. That is until the last ¼ mile running up the hill to the Iwo Jima memorial. As I recall, the course is/was lined almost every step of the way with uniformed military personnel volunteering to assist runners with whatever they need. Running through Georgetown is also fun with crowds of students out cheering on the runners.

Dan
Spot on review. If it's been a few years since you ran it, the Wear Blue Run to Remember mile might not have been there. It's very inspirational!

https://www.wearblueruntoremember.or...corps-marathon

https://www.google.com/search?client...id:zZT80Lt8Ook
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