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Was this wheel laced correctly?

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Was this wheel laced correctly?

Old 02-23-21, 03:26 PM
  #51  
SurferRosa
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I would use cotton rim tape.
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Old 02-23-21, 03:46 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by polymorphself View Post
I picked up the wheel. They grinded the spokes down and they seem to be an OK length now. That being said, almost the entire length of the rim is scratched now and I assume it’s from the grinder. This is annoying but purely cosmetic and of course not somethin to that can be seen so I’m over it. Likely won’t be going back for anything other than item purchases though, if even.

Any worrisome last minute things I should check for before mounting these?

Yes.

Feel *every* spoke end. One sharp edge is too many.

Feel every spoke's tension. I grab pairs each side and squeeze towards each other, you go around a few times and you can tell if any are much looser or tighter than the rest on that side - rears have dish and so feel different each side, front should be the same. This is not expert-feel stuff, once around every pair and you'll know what you're doing.

Make sure it's true - if it's not and you assume it is and you ride it and find out later, well, you'll never know.

And just in case they adjusted the bearings, check them.
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Old 02-23-21, 03:54 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
I'd venture to guess they got the indexing off one hole when they started the 2nd set.
That will result in alternating spokes being too long.
I thought this was a pretty clever suggestion but when I looked closely at pictures it looked like to me that the spokes were in the right relationship. There wasn't a picture where I could look straight down to see if 2 spokes from each flange where in the right order. This is an easy place for a mistake to happen like you suggested.
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Old 03-04-21, 03:01 AM
  #54  
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Just built my first wheel with some spokes that i had laying around, they ended up a bit long, these should be changed/ground down right?
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Old 03-04-21, 04:37 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by geeteeiii View Post
Just built my first wheel with some spokes that i had laying around, they ended up a bit long, these should be changed/ground down right?
Not necessary - the wheel can be used as is - as long as none of the spokes extend past the surface the base tape sticks to; none look to, but check.

Grinding them down in situ would be challenging.

Yes they should be changed - you need the practice.
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Old 03-04-21, 07:52 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by polymorphself View Post
For those echoing the sentiment of learning to build them myself, I hear ya! In the years since joining this forum I've learned to handle most of my own bicycle needs and I'm very grateful for it. I will likely dive into wheel building, but my hopes for this wheel set was a quick turn-around with no room for error as I want to get the bike loaded up for a few camping trips as soon as possible. I assumed tackling the build myself would take lots of time and practice and possible result in failure on a trip. But alas...
But alas.... My first wheel, built 11 years ago, is still going strong. It's become my favorite aspect of bike wrenching.
I can also recommend Roger Musson's book. I printed the whole thing.

Last edited by seedsbelize; 03-04-21 at 07:58 PM.
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Old 03-06-21, 10:51 AM
  #57  
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Pretty good results for spokes you just had lying around. Well done.

Just be careful: The rim strip will deform slightly into the grommets when the tube is inflated. (With a cloth rim tape you can see the persisting dimpling when you remove the tube.). Sometimes the tube can herniate just far enough into the dimple to contact the spoke end. Even through the interposed rim strip this can puncture the tube if you hit a bump just right. It can be an infuriatingly obscure cause of punctures.

Suggest you use a cloth rim strip for better padding if you have any doubt about how much clearance you have in there. If you have to use plastic strip to get the tire to go on, consider this cause if you get punctures on the rim side of the tube over a spoke hole. A fix would be to place nipple washers under each nipple to bring the head of the nipple up to the end of the spoke. I’ve never had to do this but I imagine it’s easier and cheaper than relacing the wheel with new, shorter spokes.

Do this only if you get punctures. It’s probably fine.
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Old 03-06-21, 11:51 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by conspiratemus1 View Post
Pretty good results for spokes you just had lying around. Well done.

Just be careful: The rim strip will deform slightly into the grommets when the tube is inflated. (With a cloth rim tape you can see the persisting dimpling when you remove the tube.). Sometimes the tube can herniate just far enough into the dimple to contact the spoke end. Even through the interposed rim strip this can puncture the tube if you hit a bump just right. It can be an infuriatingly obscure cause of punctures.

Suggest you use a cloth rim strip for better padding if you have any doubt about how much clearance you have in there. If you have to use plastic strip to get the tire to go on, consider this cause if you get punctures on the rim side of the tube over a spoke hole. A fix would be to place nipple washers under each nipple to bring the head of the nipple up to the end of the spoke. I’ve never had to do this but I imagine it’s easier and cheaper than relacing the wheel with new, shorter spokes.

Do this only if you get punctures. It’s probably fine.
About washers -

a) he'd need 3 or more washers each to get the nipples far enough away to hide the spoke ends;
b) normal nipple washers won't fit in the eyelet socket; and
c) taking each spoke off to get the washers on the nipple and putting the whole fiddly arangement back would be more work than just taking each spoke off and replacing it with a shorter one.

Last edited by oneclick; 03-06-21 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 03-06-21, 04:19 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by geeteeiii View Post
Just built my first wheel with some spokes that i had laying around, they ended up a bit long, these should be changed/ground down right?
No, but you have less margin to true the wheel later on.
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Old 03-06-21, 04:21 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by polymorphself View Post
I picked up the wheel. They grinded the spokes down and they seem to be an OK length now. That being said, almost the entire length of the rim is scratched now and I assume it’s from the grinder. This is annoying but purely cosmetic and of course not somethin to that can be seen so I’m over it. Likely won’t be going back for anything other than item purchases though, if even.

Any worrisome last minute things I should check for before mounting these?

they took the cheap and easy way out. disappointing. Leaves you to remove the tire in my view to anything more but the most delicate truing.
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Old 03-07-21, 05:59 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
Hozan makes a tool for nipping those excess threads.
Sort of an aside here but a friend has a pile of old bike tools, many that he does not understand. One, I realized, is a vintage Eldi spoke nipper. Odd looking tool with a pair of round heads that look badly misaligned. Once I realized what is was I tried it. Very impressive. I was careful to cut across the slot in the spoke nipple (vs along the slot) and it cut clean and easy. I could then unscrew the spoke without any need to dress the cut end.

As mentioned recently, using a too long spoke then nipping the protruding end off sounds nice but you then may not have the threads you need for tension adjustment later. So there is a trade off. Think first. Measure twice and cut once.
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Old 03-07-21, 02:47 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
they took the cheap and easy way out. disappointing. Leaves you to remove the tire in my view to anything more but the most delicate truing.
I was more worried about the marks left in the rim by the grinder.
I bought a new 1979 Raleigh Super Course where the factory had ground down all the spoke ends in the rear wheel. I was having mystery flats for some time before I found sharp burrs in the aluminum of the Weinmann Concave A124 rims that were left by the coarse grinding wheel. I had to sand out the inside of the rim and was left feeling disgusted by their careless oversight having ruined so many rides by that point. The only good thing about this was that I ended up working at the shop where I had been going for all the patches and tubes. They were a Fuji dealer and my next bike ended up being a Fuji S12S built from shop remnants after my Super Course got stolen. I don't think they were happy that I repainted it without the Fuji Branding (I just wanted it to be silver instead of burgundy).
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