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Plant based

Old 11-19-21, 10:54 PM
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Singlespeed420
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Plant based

Any other plant based cyclist here? Anyone snack on anything good while riding? I usually bring dates & cliff bars.
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Old 11-20-21, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Singlespeed420 View Post
Any other plant based cyclist here? Anyone snack on anything good while riding? I usually bring dates & cliff bars.
I would love to convert but I'm too ignorant. watched a documentary (The Game Changers?) that was a real eye opener. the plant based athletes were amazing
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Old 11-20-21, 02:32 PM
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Much of the couple years or so I was all vegetable with the exception of maybe 6 to 8 oz. of fish and a half dozen eggs a week were what I consider the best cycling shape I ever was.

I mostly put my carbs in my bottles. Though then as now a banana, raisins, dried figs or dried apricots are a treat. Lately, after the ride I'm using chocolate flavored soy milk as a recovery drink. Seems to have a the correct amount of protein and enough carbs for recovery. Though chocolate milk itself compares pretty much the same.

I haven't found a need for protein while on the bike and actually riding, but I think it might make some drink mixes taste and go down a little smoother if one needs that smoothness.
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Old 11-21-21, 09:34 AM
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If by "plant based" you mean Vegan, then no I'm not vegan; however, I do eat a good amount of foods from plants I grow in my yard. I do this because there are tons of nutrients we don't get from foods bought in the grocery store, including "fresh" fruits and veggies, simply because the produce is grown in unhealthy soil, including much of the so-called organic foods. Also, you just can't get much nutrients from animal sources, unless you're eating things not common in most diets, i.e. the organs of the animal -- there's just not much nutritional value in plain meat. Then you got the highly processed foods....don't get me started

It is surprising just how much nutritional value one can get from growing various plants and not just traditional garden varieties. I grow things like Moringa trees, Cassava, purslane and a number of native plants to Florida.

Interesting info on Cassava leaves: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7784394/


Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) leaves contained a high level of crude protein (29.3-32.4% dry weight) compared to a conventional vegetable, Amaranthus (19.6%). Ash was 4.6-6.4% in cassava leaf samples but 13.1% dry weight in Amaranthus. Dietary fibre was very high in all samples (26.9-39% dry weight) while HCN-potential was low (5.1-12.6 mg/100 g dry weight). Tannin was the highest in IITA red cassava leaves (29.7 mg/g) and the lowest in Amaranthus vegetable. In vitro digestibility was very low in oven dried samples (15.6-22.7%). Blanching increased protein content (except Amaranthus) and in vitro protein digestibility but decreased ash, minerals, dietary fibre and tannin, while HCN-potential was unchanged. Grinding reduced both HCN-potential and tannin by 84 and 71% respectively while oven drying only reduced the HCN content marginally. Preference studies showed that the highest percentage of respondents (25.3%) preferred Amaranthus vegetable, followed by Celosia (17.5%), Talinum (12.4%), garden egg (11.5%), with cassava leaves as the least (0.5%). Organoleptic evaluation rated cassava leaf soup inferior to Amaranthus in terms of appearance, colour and texture but equal in terms of taste and flavour and overall acceptability.
Interesting info on Purslane: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/

Recent research demonstrates that purslane has better nutritional quality than the major cultivated vegetables, with higher beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, and alpha-linolenic acid [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B3]3]. Additionally, purslane has been described as a power food because of its high nutritive and antioxidant properties [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B4]4]. Different varieties, harvesting times, and environmental conditions can contribute to purslane's nutritional composition and benefits [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B5]5].

Purslane is popular as a traditional medicine in China for the treatment of hypotension and diabetes. Scientifically, it is not proven to have antidiabetic effects, but still people use it for this purpose. An experiment has been carried out for the extraction of crude polysaccharide(s) from purslane to investigate the hypoglycemic effects of these constituents with animal tests for the use of this plant in the treatment of diabetes [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B6]6].

2.2. Omega-3 Fatty Acid

Purslane is one of the richest green plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids. It has lower the cholesterol and triglyceride levels, raise the beneficial high density lipoprotein. Moreover, the ability of omega-3 fatty acids to decrease the thickness of the blood may be advantageous in the treatment of vascular diseases [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B3]3]. Unlike fish oils with their high cholesterol and calorie content, purslane also provides an excellent source of the beneficial omega-3 fatty acids without the cholesterol of fish oils, since it contains no cholesterol. There are 3 varieties of purslane, namely, the green, golden, and a large-leaved golden variety [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B17a]17, 18]. Important sources of omega-3 fatty acids are summarized in Table 2. It has a low incidence of cancer and heart disease, possibly due in part to purslane's naturally occurring omega-3 fatty acids [[url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/#B18]19].

Interesting info on Moringa: https://ecosh.com/superfood-moringa-...alth-benefits/

This superpalnt is highly rich in nutrition.

In fact, it is mentioned, that moringa contains:

25 x more iron than spinach,

17 x more calcium than milk,

15 x more potassium than bananas,

10 x more vitamin A than carrots,

9 x more protein than yoghurt,

and 7 x more vitamin C than oranges.

Moringa Contains in Total:

  • 92 nutrients including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fats, sterols, alcohols, ketones, acids, alkaloids and flavonoids.
  • 46 antioxidants
  • 36 anti-inflammatory agents
  • 18 amino acids
  • 9 essential amino acids
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Old 11-21-21, 05:31 PM
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I make my own ride bars whenever I can. They're a very basic, no-bake oat based bar, then you can spruce them up with extra nuts or fruits or whatnot.

Essentially this recipe: https://tempocyclist.com/2021/02/19/...bake-oat-bars/


Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
I would love to convert but I'm too ignorant. watched a documentary (The Game Changers?) that was a real eye opener. the plant based athletes were amazing
I would take many of the "results" in that doco with a massive grain of salt. It does border on vegan propaganda, but the athletes are of course incredible.

Can cyclists perform on a plant based diet?

I've been "plant based" for almost a year now and it works for me.

Was it a mega massive performance game changer? No. But I definitely feel "lighter" and recover from training faster.
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Old 11-22-21, 05:00 PM
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I've been vegetarian (eat eggs and cheese) for 20 years now and participate in a number of outdoor endurance activities. There is no "need" for meat to create performance.

All of the major fast, strong animals are vegetarian. Oxen, horses, bison, elephants, caribou, mules bulls... There are a few carnivores in that category but they generally suffer from limited endurance and require long down times to digest. The life of a predatory carnivore is usually boom/bust and balanced on the edge of starvation. One on one, there is a vegetarian prey animal that can defeat a carnivore predator in every biosphere except perhaps the polar bear in the Arctic.

Interesting when you think of it in comparison to the false narratives we propagate regarding strong meat eaters and weak vegetarians.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 11-22-21 at 05:08 PM.
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Old 11-22-21, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
I've been vegetarian (eat eggs and cheese) for 20 years now and participate in a number of outdoor endurance activities. There is no "need" for meat to create performance.All of the major fast, strong animals are vegetarian. Oxen, horses, bison, elephants, caribou, mules bulls... There are a few carnivores in that category but they generally suffer from limited endurance and require long down times to digest. The life of a predatory carnivore is usually boom/bust and balanced on the edge of starvation. One on one, there is a vegetarian prey animal that can defeat a carnivore predator in every biosphere except perhaps the polar bear in the Arctic.Interesting when you think of it in comparison to the false narratives we propagate regarding strong meat eaters and weak vegetarians.
haha awesome but we have small appendixes. so we have to cook all our veggies to get the nutrition, right?
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Old 11-23-21, 03:47 PM
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This book from GCN by Nigel Mitchell (former Team Sky head chef) is a good read and has some handy recipes in it, although you can find most of it online, even in their own YouTube library.

https://shop.globalcyclingnetwork.co...d-cyclist-book



He's a big fan of rice cakes. I'm not so much (they don't store for as long as flapjack / oat bars).
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Old 11-23-21, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
haha awesome but we have small appendixes. so we have to cook all our veggies to get the nutrition, right?
No... lots of plant based foods can be eaten raw. Just think about salad.

Some foods though, are hard to digest raw, like grains, but many people (not me) sprout them instead of cooking.
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